All Right! (Blu-Spec CD/Mini-LP Sleeve)

All Right! (Blu-Spec CD/Mini-LP Sleeve)

BY Suzuki, Isao Quartet + 1

(Customer Reviews)
$29.00
$ 17.40
SKU: THCD-304
Label:
Think/Three Blind Mice
Category:
Jazz
Add to wishlist 

The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".

The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.

All Right! is an unusual set from noted Japanese bassist Isao Suzuki.  First off he doesn't play bass on the album!  He concentrates on electric keyboards and cello.  His quartet consists of himself, Kazumi Watanabe (guitar), Osamu Kawakami (bass), Shinji Mori (drums).  This time they are augmented with electric bassist Akira Okazawa.  Its a hot plugged in set, with Suzuki playing Hammond organ, electric piano and cello.  Kazumi is given lots of room to solo.  There is one sort of lame track with Suzuki singing but its thankfully short and somewhat redeemed with Watanabe's sublime fretwork.  Yet another hot one from Three Blind Mice!

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • A new edition of XTC’s classic 1992 album, the first in a series of XTC albums to get the deluxe remix treatment.  Featuring new stereo and 5.1 surround sound mixes made from the original multitrack tapes by Steven Wilson.  Also included is the original stereo mix, instrumental mixes, and other bonus material.SW produced the new mixes with the input of founder band member Andy Partridge and the full approval of the band.Presented in special packaging with an expanded booklet and sleeve-notes by Andy Partridge, Colin Moulding and Dave Gregory, this is the cd and blu-ray version.The CD features a completely new stereo album mix, including non-album track Didn’t Hurt a Bit.Blu-Ray features:- a 5.1 Mix of the album in 96/24 LPCM.- original mix, and a new album mix by Steven Wilson, both in high resolution 96/24 LPCM stereo- exclusive instrumental versions of all new mixes in 96/24 LPCM stereo- exclusive Andy Partridge home demos and Colin Moulding work tapes for songs written for the album and contemporaneously.- filmed footage of the band working on the album in Chipping Norton Studios.- promo films for The Ballad of Peter Pumpkinhead and The Disappointed also feature on the Blu-Ray. 
    $27.00
  • "Art pop collective The Opium Cartel return after their much-acclaimed debut with their sophomore effort "Ardor". Featuring a stellar cast including No-Man/Henry Fool's Tim Bowness and Stephen Bennett, White Willow/Änglagård drummer Mattias Olsson, as well as members of Wobbler, Jaga Jazzist and Pixel, not to mention two of Norway's foremost vocal talents; Venke Knutson and Alexander Stenerud. The project is helmed by White Willow guitarist/songwriter Jacob Holm-Lupo. While continuing the atmospheric, slo-mo proggy pop sound of the first album, this new album is a somewhat different beast, taking inspiration from 80's art pop icons like The Blue Nile, Japan, Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush, as well as drawing on the contemporary electronic pop of bands like M83. This will also appeal to fans of adventurous indie acts like Field Music, Everything Everything, Sunset Rubdown and The Week That Was." 
    $16.00
  • Second album from this British project conceived by multi-instrumentalist Kevin Lawry.  He handles vocals, guitar, bass, and keys while Darin McCloskey in the drummer.  Lawry brought in Brian Anthony to handle all Mellotron parts.  The best way to describe this band would be "doom prog".  It has a clear 70s vibe - perhaps a bit like Atomic Rooster - but a band like Cathedral (the British one) come to mind.  There is a dark element present here.  The quieter, Mellotron-laden, parts could have easily been lifted off of Camel's Mirage album.  The songs tend to settle into a groove with loooong spacey parts ever present with outbursts of Iommi riffing cropping up at just the right time.  Great stuff.
    $24.00
  • Fourth album from this incendiary Swedish trio finds them hooking up with Landberk/Paatos/Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske and chaos ensues.This heavy organ dominated trio are modeled around Tony William's Lifetime but the prog rock influence of ELP is undeniable.  Keyboardist Ståle Storløkken really rips it up.  I found Fiske's playing complements the band well, adding another dimension to their sound.  This is music that is immersed in the 70s but it has extreme vitality and doesn't sound dated at all.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • I've been living with a promo of this disc for a few weeks now and find it totally mesmerizing. It's an essential purchase for any fan of Miles Davis - and particularly a fan of his electric period. The playing is amazing which is a given considering the musicians involved. Here is the official press release that details the album far better than I ever could: "In a startlingly original recreation of music associated with jazz legend Miles Davis, co-producers Bob Belden and Louiz Banks have recast familiar themes from such landmark recordings as Bitches Brew, In A Silent Way, and Kind of Blue with an East Meets West sensibility on Miles…From India. An incredibly ambitious project involving two dozen musicians from two separate continents recording in studios around the world, Miles… From India is a cross-cultural summit meeting that puts a provocative pan-global spin on such Miles classics as “All Blues,” “Spanish Key,” “So What,” “It’s About That Time” and “Jean Pierre.” Sitar and tablas, ghatam and khanjira, mridangam and Carnatic violin blend seamlessly with muted trumpet and saxophones, screaming electric guitar and grooving electric bass lines, piano, upright bass and drums on this profound fusion of Indian classical and American jazz. Recorded in Mumbai and Madras, India and New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, the music on Miles…From India was performed by classical and jazz musicians from India with the addition of musicians who have recorded or performed with Miles Davis over the span of five decades. The 2-CD set is scheduled for an April 15 release on the New York-based Times Square Records. Producer-archivist Belden, renowned for his Grammy Award-winning reissue work on a series of Miles Davis boxed sets for Sony/Columbia, explains the genesis of Miles…From India. “Yusuf Gandhi, who heads Times Square Records, and I have had conversations about doing this for the past several years. Yusuf had the connection to India and an understanding of Indian classical music along with an appreciation for jazz and also fusion music. So we had some mutual interests there. At some point we were talking about potential projects and I was just in the process of doing the On The Corner boxed set. Of course, Miles incorporated tabla and sitar on those sessions from 1972, so I suggested revisiting Miles’ Indian influenced music using some of those guys from On The Corner along with some Indian classical musicians and calling it Miles…From India. Yusuf said, ‘Perfect,’ and that was it.” Adds Gandhi, “Jazz musicians have always listened to Indian music and Indian musicians know jazz. Right now there are so many great young musicians in India that people in America have never heard of. You hear about the Ravi Shankar family and other prominent musicians from India, but you don’t hear about the younger musicians who are out there doing innovative things. So we wanted to get some of them into the picture on this project.” The Miles alumni included on the sessions are saxophonists Dave Liebman (1972-74) and Gary Bartz (1970-71), guitarists Mike Stern (1981-84), Pete Cosey (1973-76) and John McLaughlin (1969-72), bassists Ron Carter (1963-69), Michael Henderson (1970-76), Marcus Miller (1981-1984), Benny Rietveld (1987-91), keyboardists Chick Corea (1968-72), Adam Holzman (1985-87) and Robert Irving III (1980-88), drummers Jimmy Cobb (1968-63), Leon ‘Ndugu’ Chancler (1971), Lenny White (1969) and Vince Wilburn (1981, 1984-1987) and tabla player Badal Roy (1972-3). The Indian contingent is represented by keyboardist Louiz Banks, drummer Gino Banks, American-born alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa, sitarist Ravi Chari, Vikku Vinayakram (a charter member of Shakti) on ghatam, V. Selvaganesh (a member of Shakti and Remember Shakti) on khanjira, U. Shrinivas (from Remember Shakti) on electric mandolin, Brij Narain on sarod, Dilshad Khan on sarangi, Sridhar Parthasarathy on mridangam, Ranjit Barot on drums, Taufiq Qureshi and A. Sivamani on percussion, Kala Ramnath on Carnatic violin, Rakesh Chaurasia on flute and Shankar Mahadevan & Sikkil Gurucharan on Indian classical vocals. With the Indian musicians first laying down the foundation of the tracks at studios in Mumbai and Madras, the Miles alumni then added on their parts back in the States. All the parts were then digitally edited into a coherent whole so that, for instance, on a tune like “Blue in Green” you get the sense of an organic, real-time call-and-response going on between Mike Stern’s keening guitar lines (recorded in New York) and Shankar Mahadevan’s impassioned vocals (recorded in Mumbai). “All the forms were set based on my reduction of the song as a lead sheet,” explains Belden, “and then Louiz figured out how to make it fit into the cultural norms of India. And the beauty of it is these Indian guys really know how to play that music. And once they got the groove in their mind, that was it. So essentially, everything we did was a first take. They showed up with their instruments, we rolled the tape and that was it.” “Jean Pierre” was similarly structured with the Indian musicians (Ranjit Barot on drums and Rakesh Chaurasia on flute) laying down their parts to a click track. Later on in the States, drummer Vince Wilburn and keyboardist Robert Irving III added their parts in Chicago while guitarist Mike Stern and keyboardist Adam Holzman added theirs in New York. “But I had Robert Irving reacting to what the Indian drummer put down when he played while Adam Holzman reacted to what Vince had played,” explains Belden. “So you had all these people reacting to different things they didn’t hear, and when you mixed them together it worked.” Belden adds that for this Miles…From India project he relied on technology that didn’t exist five years ago. “We used the internet a lot in dealing with file sharing sites. And I was also able to use SKYPE to produce two sessions at the same time in different locations from my apartment. For ‘It’s About That Time’ I had Ndugu Chancler playing drums on the West Coast and Robert Irving in Chicago playing Hammond B-3 organ, and we were all connected in a video conference via SKYPE. They were playing back their parts, suggesting stuff, conversing back and forth with me producing back in my New York apartment. In fact, you can make a whole record that way. You leave less carbon footprints that way.” Gandhi, who also heads up the Hip-Bop label, admits that he is astonished by the seamless illusion of real time interaction that this digital technology is able to create.”Every time I listen to ‘Spanish Key,’ the way that Mike Stern comes into it when the percussionists are playing…it’s almost as if he were there with them.” Some of the other highlights of this remarkable concept project include: a version of “All Blues” in 5/4 that features the regal rhythm tandem of bassist Ron Carter and drummer Jimmy Cobb (the latter recorded on the original 1959 Kind of Blue session); a 9/4 rendition of “So What” (also from Kind of Blue) featuring bassist Carter, pianist Chick Corea and drummer Ndugu Chancler interacting with a crew of Indian percussionists and konokol vocalists; a ripping, distortion-laced Pete Cosey electric guitar solo alongside Michael Henderson’s groove-heavy electric bass lines, Dave Liebman’s flute and Kala Ramnath’s carnatic violin work on a fast version of “Ife” (from Big Fun and The Complete On The Corner Sessions); some melodic sarod playing by Pandit Brij Narain on a faithful rendition of Joe Zawinul’s lyrical anthem “In A Silent Way”; some hauntingly beautiful muted trumpet work by Wallace Roney alongside Shankar Mahadevan’s emotive vocals on “Blue In Green”; Marcus Miller’s mysterious bass clarinet alongside Roney’s trumpet and Ravi Chary’s sitar on “Great Expectations”; and some potent, jazzy soloing from trumpeter Roney, tenor saxophonist Liebman and soprano saxophonist Gary Bartz on a slow version of “Ife.” The lone commissioned work on Miles…From India is the stirring title track, composed, produced and performed by guitarist John McLaughlin with his Remember Shakti bandmate U. Shrinivas on electric mandolin, Louiz Banks on piano and Sikkil Gurucharan on vocals. This kind of East Meets West cross-cultural fusion has been going on since George Harrison played sitar on the Beatles’ “Norwegian Wood” (from 1965’s Rubber Soul). Fellow Brit guitarist and Harrison colleague Brian Jones followed suit in 1966 by playing sitar on the Rolling Stones’ hit single “Paint It Black.” John McLaughlin investigated South Indian classical music forms on the Mahavishnu’s 1971 debut The Inner Mounting Flame and Miles Davis took the plunge by incorporating tablas and sitar on 1972’s On The Corner. Some important Indo-American fusion projects that have subsequently been released include McLaughlin’s Shakti (1975) and Remember Shakti (1999), Mickey Hart’s Diga Rhythm Band (1976) and Planet Drum (1991), Talvin Singh’s Asian flavored drum ‘n’ bass recording Anokha (1997), Bill Laswell and Zakir Hussain’s Tabla Matrix (2000), Karsh Kale’s Realize (2001) and Broken English (2007) and Anoushka Shankar’s Rise (2005) and Breathing Under Water (2007). The all-star Miles…From India (2008) session represents the next step in the evolution of Indo-American jazz fusion."
    $21.00
  • Great debut from this new Italian quintet.  Pure retro prog that channels the spirit of early 70s British prog.  The band's sound is dominated by organ and heavily spiced up with guitar and flute leads.  Hugh Banton or Tony Banks' roadie must have helped set up Paolo Tognazzi's organ because it seems like its ripped right out of 1971.  Vocals are in English and while Andrea Calzoni's accent creeps in now and then he aquits himself quite well - he's got a bit of an Ian Anderson thing going on.  Nice long instrumental breaks with keys playing off the flute and guitar.  Definitely a VDGG - Osanna - PFM - Orme vibe, but keep in mind the early versions of these bands.  1971 vs 1975.  This is the good stuff.  The REALLY good stuff.The LP version comes with a gorgeous gimmix die cut gatefold cover.  I've been in this crazy business for almost 25 years (2013 is year 25).  The Italian labels always come up with the best and most innovative packaging.  They seem to cherish the way things used to be done - when album artwork was more than just something to hold the disc.  They treat the cover like a piece of artwork and ultimately the collector is rewarded with pride of ownership.
    $29.00
  • Hidden Masters is the latest retro discovery from Rise Above Records.  Typical of most of their signings, Hidden Masters are British - specifically Glasgow, Scotland.  These guys set their sights a bit earlier than Diagonal and their ilk.  This music is psychedelic tinged rock that has an affinity for Freakbeat London circa 1968.  I'm reminded of bands like The Kinks, Pretty Things, The Yardbirds.  I'm even hearing strains of US west coast psychedelia like Quicksilver Messenger Service.  Vocal harmonies are quite prominent but never reach Beach Boys levels.  If you are looking for prog moves here you will be wasting your time.  This one is a trip in the Wayback Machine but the controls are set for an earlier time.  Highly recommended if you like this sort of thing and I do."With the toybox psychedelia of Tame Impala hitting the mainstream and all things “out there” becoming the sound of summer 2013, Hidden Masters have landed at just the right time with an album which is absolutely smothered with heavy psyche. It is so psychedelic in fact, that you could be forgiven for thinking you had woken up in the late '60s and the acid had never worn off. Prepare for the trip of your life!Blasting off with ‘She Broke The Clock Of The Long Now’, sub-Sabbath riffs are interspersed with frenetic piano and melodic vocals. On top of this harmonies swoop and swoon and guitars make thrilling runs. Forget all music that has happened in the last fifty years as you are placed right in the heart of Carnaby Street once again.‘Into The Night Sky’ is held up by the piano as everything else clatters around it, Almost telekinetic, there is understanding of how this music should work and the trap off falling into too much going on is tempered by the space between. Music should be able to breathe and Hidden Masters know how to do this perfectly.‘Perfume’ could have come straight off Nuggets with its urgent vocals and swirling Hammond. It's the closest you get to a possible single but you doubt this is even considered. No, Hidden Masters are more interested in that old fashioned statement...the album. Every song is a trip in itself which as a whole satisfying whole show a relentless talent at work.Nothing sounds quite the same and by the time you get to ‘Like Candy’, which is possibly one of the greatest songs ever written with its insane sing along section followed by the funky work out on organ, you have lost all grip on reality. ‘Last Days of The Sun’ does this too only this time it transports you with its Arabian flavour. If only The Kinks were this good!There is nothing like Hidden Masters at the moment, the closest comparison in contemporary circles is Howl Griff who take a much more elegiac road. Hidden Masters are the sound of the best acid trip ever and then some. Lysergic and blistering, the sun will never be the same again." - Echoes And Dust
    $11.00
  • "New twists on the new album with the groundbreaking Swedish folk rock band. Cult ban d Kebnekaise - known for their electrified folk music - refuse to play on nostalgia. On the new album ‘pieces to their musical mosaic. Nine new songs that build on the passion and joy of folk music, from the airy happiness and steady rhythm to the melodic melancholy, conjured by psychedelic folk rock. Aventure is Kebnekajses ninth album since their debut in 1971 and the third since returning in 2001. The last album 'Idioten/The Idiot' was nominated for a Swedish Grammy in 2012 in the category 'Best Rock'. - We live on as if we never had taken a brake. For us, music is not a museum piece that sounds the same every day. Our music stands for something that doesn’t stop, but continue to evolve. Says Kenny Håkansson the bands illustrious psychedelic guitar wizard with a history in such legendary Swedish bands as T-Boones, Baby Grandmothers, Mecki Mark Men and Dag Vag. The new album 'Aventure' was recorded in the legendary Silence studios in Värmland, Koppom with non other than Anders Lind behind the controls, at the beginning of the summer. The album contains five new discoveries from the Swedish folk music treasure and four new self-written. Kebnekajses distinctive and pioneering folk rock sound is as secure as the mountain itself. As in the initial Snickar-Anders (Carpenter-Anders)  where heavy drums, percussion and double basses proud and challenging urge on distorted guitars and violin to purposefully play tag with an elusive Swedish folk melody. But the music is also allowed to take new and unexpected twists. A mandolin gives oriental pensive tone to Vallåt efter Britta Jansson (Grazing-ground Song after Britta Jansson). A Wild West guitar is accompanied by the now hilarious mandolin in Svartbergstrollen (Black Mountain Trolls), who effortlessly bounces between major and minor. The dreamy Vallåt efter  Måns Olsson (Grazing-ground Song After Måns Olsson) where the guitar folk loops hovers over a distinct African thumb piano. ‘Aventure’ offers more African elements - and three songs with vocals. On the title track Aventure Hassan Bah tells the tale of how he as a 15 years old left his home country of Guinea and eventually more or less accidentally arrived in Sweden ("... now I'm sitting on top of the mountain and looking out over Sweden"). And in concluding Battery where Hassan comments on his recent trip to Africa, in the Zuzu-language and over a high powered psychedelic afrobeat. With ‘Aventure’ Kebnekajse  add new pieces to their musical mosaic - Swedish folk rock with psychedelic overtones - now with more African undertones."
    $30.00
  • "Recorded during a show at the Storyville jazz club in Molde in May 2012, this could very well be their finest recorded effort during their ten years as a band.Bringing new meaning to the concept of loose but tight, they blend the freedom of jazz with the energy of rock in the most convincing ways as they race through numbers from all their previous four Rune Grammofon albums, taking no prisoners along the ride. On top of everything it´s also really well recorded and mixed, with a great punchy sound."First 500 copies come with the CD version.
    $25.00
  • This is the second edition (limited to 500 copies) with different artwork than the first."Norway's Tusmørke (Norwegian for twilight) go straight to the heart of the psychedelic matter on their full-length debut album "Underjordisk Tusmørke" (Subterranean Twilight). Culling influences from such prog-psych luminaries as Gong and Caravan, krautrock giants like Can and Amon Düul 2, pagan folksters like The Incredible String Band as well as a healthy dose of Nordic folk music, Tusmørke present a dark cauldron of magical, musical potions.The band's history can be traced back to the mid-nineties and the budding, Scandinavian scene of new progressive bands. Back then, the Momrak twins who are the beating heart of Tusmørke called their band Les Fleurs de Mal. The band featured future Wobbler vocalist Andreas Prestmo, and shared the stage with other up-and-coming bands like White Willow. Via intricate pathways, this evolved into Tusmørke, whose music is darker, more intense and dare we say primeval, than the more delicate Les Fleurs de Mal.This album will conjure up images of pagan rites, witches dancing in the firelight serenading the new moon, eldritch wizards conjuring dark spirits… And it's no gimmick: This band lives and breathes the same air that flows through the magical lands their music describes.The album has been expertly recorded and produced by that master of retro productions, Lars Fredrik Frøislie (Wobbler, White Willow, In Lingua Mortua), and sounds so authentically analogue that you can practically smell the antique equipment that has been used for its making. Lars contributes mellotron, chamberlin, spinet, Hammond organ and a host of esoteric instruments on the album."
    $19.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.This is the first of a trilogy of albums coordinated by label founder Tee Fuji.  Its a bit of an all-star jam with members of the TBM roster.  Its a fully electric set that features serious blowing.  Some of it gets pretty freaky but in a good way."Sounds beyond compare – one of those really special 70s sessions from the Japanese Three Blind Mice label – put together in a way that almost seems to be a genre unto itself! The group here have a keen understanding of advances in free jazz and fusion, but work with a deeper spiritual undercurrent and a great sense of sound (shaped by producer Takashi "Tee" Fujii) – so that their individual instrumental elements flow together in rich new ways that are sometimes subtle, sometimes quite righteous! The lineup shifts a bit from track to track – and the set features xcellent work on flute and bass clarinet from Kenji Mori, electric piano from Masaru Imada, tenor from Takao Uematsu, and bass and cello from Nobuyoshi Ino. Titles include "End Of November", "Mort", "Our Foolish", and "Dragon Garden"."
    $29.00
  • "Edinburgh’s North Atlantic Oscillation have kicked up one hell of a metaphorical storm on ‘Fog Electric’, their second album ... There are hints of Mogwai and Hot Chip here, but in terms of pace and mood, it's Engineers that draw the closest comparisons, along with more recent Scottish bands of the same ilk such as Found and Errors. To simply label ‘Fog Electric’ as post-rock would be doing it something of a disservice though. All 10 tracks are more experimental than that, with the band building in layers throughout, thanks to samples, electronics, keyboards, hazy rhythm guitars, rocky riffs and Sam Healy’s effect-heavy vocals ... At its height, ‘Fog Electric’ makes you sit up and pay attention, a bit like storms themselves can." - Kevin Scott, Echoes & Dust
    $23.00
  • Al DiMeola's solo debut from 1976, was released right around the time of RTF's Romantic Warrior. Stellar lineup includes the other three members of Return To Forever, Mingo Lewis, Steve Gadd, Anthony Jackson, Barry Miles, Jaco Pastorius, and Alphonse Mouzon.
    $5.00
  • The second album of a projected 4 disc series. This one is heavier than Ki and also features Anneke Van Giersbergen (ex-The Gathering) as guest vocalist.
    $12.00