Court Of Circe

Court Of Circe

BY Taylor, Fred

(Customer Reviews)
$9.00
$ 5.40
SKU: CCR-FT-1
Label:
Crinkle Cut Records
Category:
Fusion
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Once you start dig you never know what you will find.  Searching through the time capsule known as the Internet I stumbled across an album by Fred Taylor that was categorized as privately released fusion.  Fred Taylor is a drummer/percussionist based out of Seattle.  He self-released Court Of Circe in 1981.  While parts of the album definitely fit into the fusion realm quite a bit of it would be closer to modal jazz/kosmigroov.  The 14 minute two part title track shows off Taylor's skills as a drummer.  Other soloists on the album include keyboards, guitar and soprano sax.  Vinyl copies of this album are starting to skyrocket in price as more and more people find out about it.  Turns out that Taylor released this on CD back in 2004 and was more than happy to hook us up at a great price.  If your tastes run towards the jazzier side of fusion you should check this out.

"... Spokane drummer Fred Taylor... has produced a more interesting jazz record... Featuring a dozen local musicians, its production is crisp and full. Taylor. obviously an organizer, has managed to get these dozen locals to play his sensible, stretched-out arrangements very well. "Flutterby's Waltz" skips in and out of tempo and features Taylor's sensitive cymbal technique, an appropriately meandering soprano sax solo by Craig Lawrence, and a Hammond organ solo, an unusual touch." - Seattle Weekly

 

Product Review

Red Circle 1
Thu, 2015-12-17 16:55
Rate: 
0
This was a very nice find. Unsure of who this guy was and whether he ever recorded again I took the plunge and was nicely surprised. Think post Coltrane Elvin Jones meets Oregon. That's the best I can do for a description.
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Product Review

Red Circle 1
Thu, 2015-12-17 16:55
Rate: 
0
This was a very nice find. Unsure of who this guy was and whether he ever recorded again I took the plunge and was nicely surprised. Think post Coltrane Elvin Jones meets Oregon. That's the best I can do for a description.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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