Fly By Night ($5 Special)

SKU: 314534624
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Progressive Rock
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The band's second album. At this point the progressive elements were just starting to be displayed.  Remastered edition.

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  • "The Moody Blues returned after a five year hiatus with a very different sounding album. The punk and disco era were now in full flower and such groups as Styx, Journey, and REO Speedwagon were dominating the rock charts. Octave would abandon the cosmic and symphonic sound of the group’s past, and move toward one more in tune with the era. As such it would not stand out as a unique creation as did their core of classic albums.Octave would also be the last album for founding member Mike Pinder. He had always provided a spiritual and in many ways the classical center of their music through his mellotron and chamberlin. Now playing a synthesizer the sound was different and not as grand. Years later it would come to light that he was not pleased with the musical direction of the group. Patrick Moraz would replace him as the group’s keyboardist and tour in support of the album.Octave would have no unifying theme and be the most diffuse album that The Moody Blues had released up until that time. Each song would match the individual personality of its composer.The John Lodge composition, “Steppin’ In A Slide Zone,” was typical of the new sound. It is a typical energetic Lodge rocker but the musical center was the keyboard-guitar interplay which was in vogue at the time. Still it was catchy and was a commercially successful single.Justin Hayward is in ballad mode for this release and while he would not create anything as wonderful or unique as “Nights In White Satin,” his music is still very listenable because of the innate beauty of the songs. “Had To Fall In Love” and “Top Rank Suite” are both very mellow. “Driftwood” is the best of the three as it is a gentle love ballad which was a Hayward trademark by this time.Ray Thomas created two songs for this release. “I’m Your Man” just disappears but “Under Moonshine” contains a strong lead vocal by him plus some classic harmonies by the other members of the group.“One Step Into The Light” would be a final spiritual statement by Mike Pinder and his only composition on the album. The music would be more progressive rock than the grandiose sound of his past as he would bring his Moody Blues career to a conclusion.A fourth Justin Hayward song would close the album. “The Day We Meet Again” would unintentionally or intentionally point toward the future as a new keyboardist was on the way and the grand classical sounds were being left behind.Make no mistake, Octave remains a very good late seventies album but does fall short of the group’s best work. It was different, more modern, and ultimately a transitional work. Despite all that it still remains a good, if not essential, Moody Blues listen today." - Blogcritics.org
    $9.00
  • "Dimension is a progressive metal band, based in Denver, CO, USA. It was founded in 1999 by David Quicho (guitars and vocals) & Mane Cabrales (drums) . They play a heavy yet melodic brand of progressive metal, and Revolution is a double disc with over 90 minutes of music.With The Source, it begins with a haunting piano, with Quicho's vocals coming in shortly after. His vocals use an almost phaser like effect, which can sound a little weird to someone not used to it. Though soon afterwards he shows his strong vocal range. Ranging from a John Arch(ex-Fates Warning) Or Charlie Dominici(ex-Dream Theater, Dominici) high to a more aggressive mid range, ala Harry Conklin(ex-Jag Panzer). The next two songs offer something a little bit different, with a huge melodic chorus during Pale Horse that showcases some great drumming from Cabrales and vocals from Quicho. With a little title like The Waltz Of Death you might expect a symphonic intro, and it does, with a waltz to boot! After that intro, the song is a big melodic song with some nice guitar solos, and tempo changes as well. New Day is a haunting slower melodic song, that really highlights Quicho song. This song you will either love or hate his vocals, but the vocal melody matches the song perfectly. Some great instrumentation as well mid song, and an added heaviness heard midway adds a dynamic to the song. Tears of Blood and The Resistance are two mid to faster paced songs, with the latter having a great straight-ahead guitar riff, that easily induces headbanging. The added keyboards in the beginning of The Resistance definitely gives the song a progressive feel to it. Some great drumming, with certain notes being accented more than others, gives the song an aggressive feeling, though the song itself is very melodic. Welcome To America is a song you will want to listen to the lyrics for, especially if you live in America. The last song on disc one is a cover of The Beatles classic, Eleanor Rigby. While this song has been covered numerous times, I really did enjoy this progressive metal take on it. At just barely over two minutes long, it definitely is short and sweet.Angel starts off disc two, and much like what was heard on disc one is a mixture of heavier parts and melodic parts lead by Quicho's unique vocals. The song has a great instrumental section just after the three minute mark. The next song Human Device shares a lot of the same ideas presented in Angel without sounding like the same song. The instrumental, The End Of All Things is next, and it takes its time building up into one massive piece of precise musicianship. Unlike a lot of their contemporaries, Dimension does not over do it with the instrumentation. Yes there is definite technical skill from all three members, but they don't stray too far away into wankery-land where the song ends up sounding like one long jam section. There is definitely a well thought out song structure here. The epic not only in length, but in melodies, time signatures, and everything else you would expect from a solid progressive metal band, can be found in the nineteen minute plus, War Dream. A heavily melodic song with great instrumental passages, weaves back and forth between melody, technical prowess, and heavier parts of the song. I could write a review about this one song. Much like Eleanor Rigby ended the first disc, the classic Led Zeppelin, Immigrant Song ends disc two. Maintaining the Page riff, and the Plant vocal melodies, the song does not stray too far from its source material, but has a personal and welcomed Dimension touch to it.Reviewing a double disc from a band I don't know, has been daunting, but definitely a welcomed challenge. I researched the band's previous releases to find that Marty on this site had reviewed their 2007 disc, Ego. From the samples of Ego I have heard, I honestly believe the band has taken the next step in their evolution. Dimension is definitely a solid band, and one that should be on the radar for fans of the genre. Most songs have complex song structures, yet are accessible to those who enjoy melodic music as well." - Metal Reviews
    $14.00
  • "Four years in the making, Norway's Triosphere returns with their third album, The Heart of the Matter. It was worth the wait. While reviewed previously on this site by another reviewer, this is my first experience with the band.There's many things to like about Triosphere. Not the least of which, for a female-fronted band, is that vocalist and bassist Ida Haukland is a pure melodic metal singer, not swaying to the extremes of operatic or death vocals. Another significant element is simply their superb sense of songwriting. They have an arsenal of weapons to draw from whether an abundance of catchy riffs, a strong melody, vocal harmony, notable rock groove, or sizzling leads. I think, more than anything, the guitar structure, riffs and leads, are rather immense and attractive, propelling the album. You can't avoid the swell of riffs and leads within songs such as Steal Away The Light or As I Call, melodic and inspiring. But Triosphere wraps all these elements up in imaginative and entertaining arrangements, nearing progressive metal, that make for essential melodic metal listening.While the entire album is a rich tapestry of melodic metal, a few songs deserve some attention thanks to some interesting passages within. One is Breathless, a steady sturdy number that has this interesting breakdown after the half way point. The riffs collapse for this light guitar work, almost fusion, over equally slight drums. Another terrific song follows in Departure. It has its share of riffs and some staccato drums, but once more, it's the latter guitar segue that grabs you. More emotive and lighter leads over subtle bass and drums. A third song of interest is the later Remedy with a smooth melody and enormous vocal harmony. But the kicker, once more, is the guitar breakdown in the latter half. Different than the previous songs, it's sharper and heavier, riff based yet fiery, and propelled by some intricate drumming. Finally, the entire swail of riffage is abandoned at the end of the album for the acoustic and gentle ballad Virgin Ground. A respite perhaps? All in all, Triosphere, with The Heart of the Matter, has turned out a rather terrific and enjoyable album of melodic heavy metal. Easily recommended." - Dangerdog
    $16.00
  • Perhaps we all burnt out on this album some time ago - I know I played it to death. Released in the US as "Security". In retrospect it may well be Gabriel's solo album that held up the best and could be considered the pinnacle of his solo career. Gabriel explored world music tribal rhythms and sampled sounds The whole album has lots of electronic processing courtesy of Larry Fast which lend an otherworldly quality to the production (which is of audiophile standards). It's an extremely dynamic recording that will tax your audio system and your brain. This one is filled with classics like "San Jacinto" and "Lay Your Hands On Me". Not prog rock per se - but progressive for sure. Very forward thinking thought provoking intense music. A classic.
    $12.00
  • Latest from Germany's melodic metal Gods.
    $13.00
  • "Charismatic duo Se Delan is the newest act to be signed to Kscope, a revered label known for its “post-progressive sounds” and incredible line-up, which includes genre stars like Anathema, Gazpacho, Amplifier, Steven Wilson, and The Pineapple Thief. Considering its peers, then, it's surprising to note how laidback and relatively simple the music on the group’s debut LP, The Fall, is. Rather than aim for lengthy songs, virtuosic arrangements, and grandiose ideas, the pair constructs warm yet solemn atmospheres and subtle yet alluring melodies.It’s an enticing and moody introduction to a band that definitely earns its place amongst so many dazzling siblings.Comprised of multi-instrumentalist Justin Greaves (Crippled Black Phoenix) and Swedish vocalist Belinda Kordic (whose wispy voice is both seductive and haunting), the record is an interesting blend of folk, shoegaze, rock, and pop, like a wonderful blend of Alcest, Of Monsters and Men, and Lady & Bird. As you might’ve guessed, Greaves crafted the music while Kordic wrote the melodies. Although it’s arguably a bit too cyclical in arrangement and melody, The Fall is a chilling and beautiful examination of life." - Rebel Noise 
    $16.00
  • "Dark Sarah is a concept project from Finland, led by singer/songwriter Heidi Parviainen (former lead singer of the Symphonic Metal act Amberian Dawn). Financed by successful indiegogo campaigns, Dark Sarah’s Behind The Black Veil brings together a number of veteran musicians and singers and the act has released a strong and theatrical debut.Although not 100% new material (separate funding campaigns had allowed the first eight tracks to be released as two individual EPs), Behind The Black Veil consists of 12 main songs along with two bonus tracks – a substantial amount of theatrical goodness. Heidi Parviainen’s strong voice is the centerpiece of the release, and it remains as powerful and clear as ever. She shares the microphone with guests Manuela Kraller (Xandria), Inga Scharf (Van Canto), and Tony Kakko (Sonata Arctica). The band behind Heidi is technically excellent, consisting of guitarists Kasperi Heikkinen (U.D.O, Merging Flare) and Erkka Korhonen, bassists Jukka Koskinen (Wintersun) and Rude Rothst√©n, and drummers Teemu Laitinen and Lauri Kuussalo.“Save Me”‘ opens the album, and is the epitome of “cinematic” metal. A sad and melancholy track introduces the character of Dark Sarah and sets the standard for the tracks that follow. Dramatic orchestral musical passages and near operatic vocals are carried by well done keyboards and strong lyrics that lay the groundwork for the rest of the album. “Poison Apple” starts with moody keys but it quickly becomes a heavy rocker with intense bass and drums. On the whole this song is nicely balanced between metal and orchestral instruments. “Hide And Seek” is a stirring keyboard driven ballad that brings out the true beauty and power of Heidi’s voice. “Memories Fall” is a well done, energetic duet with Xandria’s Manuela Kraller, and their two voices complement each other well while riding over a crunching guitar line.“Evil Roots” kicks off the second quartet of songs. Inga Scharf (Van Canto) lends her voice to this well done Power Metal track, and the lead and backing vocal work on this track is truly outstanding. Broadway theatrics make an appearance on the unusual “Violent Roses” – a Tim Burton-esque cinematic track that starts slow and low and ramps up the intensity as it progresses. “Hunting The Dreamer” is a rousing rocker with a kicky rhythm line and driving bass. The interplay of full metal (great guitar solo!) and orchestra gives this one a unique personality. “Fortress” starts as a soft, moody and introspective piece with some nicely done vocals and textures, and then gets kicked up in power and speed as guitars, bass and drums join the keys.“Silver Tree” is a wonderfully done up-tempo piece with plenty of keyboards and lush orchestration, highlighted by a slightly manic drum line. Soft keys and peaceful vocals start off the power ballad “Sun, Moon, And Stars” – a song with a very simple arrangement in comparison to the rest of the release. “Light In You” is a superb Broadway showstopper – quite probably the most powerful song of the album – and features the wonderful voice of Tony Kakko (Sonata Arctica) playing The Moon, deep in conversation with Sarah. The official story closes on a high with the peaceful piano-driven “Sarah’s Theme”. Bonus tracks fill the balance of the run time – an orchestral version of “Memories Fall,” and very quirky, bloody, and somewhat amusing “A Grim Christmas Story” – very Tim Burton!Despite being produced at different times and with different performers, Behind The Black Veil has a consistent, solid sound. There is a good deal of warmth in the orchestral pieces, yet they are crystal clear. Heidi’s voice is crisp and accessible, and the musical delivery by the entire Dark Sarah ensemble is technically excellent. The music is powerful, the performances tight, and the story is one just waiting to be brought to life on file or stage. While the dark material and heavy orchestral overtones won’t appeal to everyone, fans of symphonic, Gothic, or female fronted metal will find a lot to enjoy.Dark Sarah’s Behind The Black Veil is highly recommended for fans of the darker, Symphonic genres." - Hard Rock Haven 
    $14.00
  • Cineploit is a small Austrian label dedicated to releasing original music in the vein of 70s horror and Euro-trash exploitation films.  All of the releases are quite limited.First Stage Zoltan is the debut release from this British trio based around the brothers Andy and Matt Thompson and Andrew Prestridge.  The instrumentation is pure vintage analog synthesizer based keys, bass, acoustic guitar, and drums.  You dig Mellotron?  This band hammers you with it.  There are a number of bands influenced by Goblin - Zombi, Anime Morte, Morte Macabre.  Add Zoltan to the list.  Goblin is an obvious point of reference as is the soundtrack music of John Carpenter, Fabio Frizzi and even Manuel Gottsching's later Ashra phase.  The synth leads remind me quite a bit of vintage Eloy circa Ocean, cutting through the ether but with a touch of evil.Limited to 250 copies - don't blink because they will be gone.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • Yet another groove 'n riff monster from Devon Graves. Emotion charged slow mover with a definite Tool vibe. Graves calls this "tribal metal" but I would say that it approaches metal from more of a doom angle. The flute work on "The Gossamer Strand" caused Eric Corbin, Inside Out's promo dude extraordinare, to refer the band as Jethro Tool!
    $7.00
  • Chicago based Oceanborn are a very interesting new progressive metal band.  They draw influences from a variety of styles.  You can hear Avenged Sevenfold, Muse, Katatonia, and Dream Theater in their musicial DNA.  Vocals are all clean and most definitely angst driven.  Entwined with the progressive elements is a melodic, almost pop quality that creeps into the fray only to be beaten down by crushing riffs.  Somewhat of a tough album to describe but something really cool going on here.  Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Love 'em or hate 'em you know you want to hear them. This British cheese metal band has captured the hearts and souls of the Guitar Hero set. For any metal head that thinks time stood still in 1984.
    $4.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Certainly one of the greatest Canterbury albums of all time. 30 years after release Nine Feet Underground still generates shivers. Features 24 bit remastering, new liner notes, and bonus tracks.
    $9.00