Fly By Night ($5 Special)

SKU: 314534624
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Progressive Rock
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The band's second album. At this point the progressive elements were just starting to be displayed.  Remastered edition.

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  • "Four years in the making, Norway's Triosphere returns with their third album, The Heart of the Matter. It was worth the wait. While reviewed previously on this site by another reviewer, this is my first experience with the band.There's many things to like about Triosphere. Not the least of which, for a female-fronted band, is that vocalist and bassist Ida Haukland is a pure melodic metal singer, not swaying to the extremes of operatic or death vocals. Another significant element is simply their superb sense of songwriting. They have an arsenal of weapons to draw from whether an abundance of catchy riffs, a strong melody, vocal harmony, notable rock groove, or sizzling leads. I think, more than anything, the guitar structure, riffs and leads, are rather immense and attractive, propelling the album. You can't avoid the swell of riffs and leads within songs such as Steal Away The Light or As I Call, melodic and inspiring. But Triosphere wraps all these elements up in imaginative and entertaining arrangements, nearing progressive metal, that make for essential melodic metal listening.While the entire album is a rich tapestry of melodic metal, a few songs deserve some attention thanks to some interesting passages within. One is Breathless, a steady sturdy number that has this interesting breakdown after the half way point. The riffs collapse for this light guitar work, almost fusion, over equally slight drums. Another terrific song follows in Departure. It has its share of riffs and some staccato drums, but once more, it's the latter guitar segue that grabs you. More emotive and lighter leads over subtle bass and drums. A third song of interest is the later Remedy with a smooth melody and enormous vocal harmony. But the kicker, once more, is the guitar breakdown in the latter half. Different than the previous songs, it's sharper and heavier, riff based yet fiery, and propelled by some intricate drumming. Finally, the entire swail of riffage is abandoned at the end of the album for the acoustic and gentle ballad Virgin Ground. A respite perhaps? All in all, Triosphere, with The Heart of the Matter, has turned out a rather terrific and enjoyable album of melodic heavy metal. Easily recommended." - Dangerdog
    $16.00
  • "US band ODIN'S COURT have been around ever since 2001, with a good handful of productions to their name so far, and in terms of full length albums they have released six of them so far. Their most recent one, "The Warmth of Mediocrity", was issued through US label The RecordLabel.net's Progrock Records division towards the end of 2013.While this is a full length album, I guess the majority would really sort this one as a compilation rather than a bonafide studio disc, as the greater majority of the songs have been pulled from old releases. But as these songs have been both remixed and to some extent remade as well, due to the addition of Dimetrius LaFavors as lead vocalist, this really is a new album even if much of the material have been available in other versions previously.As far as style is concerned, Odin's Court is among those bands that venture back and forth across the border between the rock and metal part of the progressive universe, although the main emphasis appears to be on the latter of these. They explore, at least in recent years, a brand of progressive metal that explore the contrasts between grimy, gnarly dark toned guitar riff constructions and light toned, subtly exotic sounding keyboard textures, with ample room for movements of a more careful nature to alternate between the harder edged and more intense ones. The piano is employed for an additional delicate touch on several occasions, and what I presume to be digitally crafted orchestral backings also have their place in the material of this band. The dulcimer is also used to good effects to convey effects of a more careful nature within this landscape.From what I can recall of their older material, it would appear that their new vocalist is a good addition to this band. There are still some issues with the vocals however. That there are songs here not written with the new vocalist and his particular voice in mind is a fact, and that some of the vocal parts comes across as somewhat odd in structure and execution both is a detrimental detail at times. As is the band's slight tendency to hit off in a dramatic, technically oriented run with quirky staccato riff bursts in asynchronous patterns, although this latter aspect probably has more to do with personal taste and not quite as much to do with stylistic expression and structure as such.Personally I found the band to be most interesting when exploring territories of a more regular nature, with the remade version of Utopian Rust and the following instrumental Paradise Lost: Chapter 1 to be clear album highlights. The former a fairly traditional progressive metal creation sporting a fairly smooth, dark toned guitar riff and a fairly predictable but effective keyboard contrast as the dominant elements, with compelling harmony based guitar soloing and a nifty bass motif beneath that fits this song in this guise very well indeed. The latter of these two songs appears to be a case of progressive metal inspired by classical music, using orchestral details to supplement the guitars and organ that otherwise sets the mood and atmosphere. Opening and title track The Warmth of Mediocrity also warrants a mention, and again we're dealing with a more common variety of progressive metal with strong and distinct contrasts between guitar riffs and keyboards, majestic themes and a harmony based song in general expression and instrumental solo runs both.All in all a somewhat uneven production as far as I'm concerned, where the most experimental numbers also comes across as the least inspired of the lot. But when Odin's Court starts exploring a more common and predictable variety of progressive metal, then they are going strong with all cylinders firing in a fitting, majestic manner. A band and an album worth taking a look at if you're curious of a band that are at their best exploring traditional progressive metal Dream Theater style, while also having a go at assembling compositions of a more challenging nature that may not be quite as appealing - all of this very much depending on personal taste admittedly." - ProgArchives
    $3.00
  • "Get All You Deserve is a high-definition 4 disc audio-visual set from Steven Wilson.Directed by long-time visual collaborator Lasse Hoile, Get All You Deserve was filmed in Mexico City during the recent Grace For Drowning Tour. The set captures the spectacular live experience that Wilson and Hoile created for the tour on Blu-ray, DVD and 2CD.Following the release of Grace For Drowning, Steven embarked on his first ever solo tour, assembling a virtuoso band, featuring Marco Minnemann (drums), Nick Beggs (bass), Theo Travis (flute and sax), Adam Holzman (keys) and Niko Tsonev (guitars), to accompany him. For the shows he worked extensively with Lasse to create a show unlike anything else he had attempted with his other bands, Porcupine Tree, Blackfield, No-Man or Bass Communion.The shows immersed fans in a rich sensory experience: rear speakers provide surround-sound effects, giant screens show off Lasse's films made specifically to accompany these songs, and cutting-edge lighting designs giving texture to each song.Get All You Deserve captures one of the key shows from the tour. Recorded at a sold-out Teatro Metropolitan in Mexico City, the gig features tracks from both Wilson's solo albums along with the new, as yet unreleased, track Luminol. " 
    $13.00
  • Love 'em or hate 'em you know you want to hear them. This British cheese metal band has captured the hearts and souls of the Guitar Hero set. For any metal head that thinks time stood still in 1984.
    $4.00
  • Jettisoning the spacey sounding keys used on Venus or Fantasma, Germany's Everon still whip up a hard edged neo-progressive rock sound. Still plenty of keys used but there is a more direct immediacy to the music than before.
    $16.00
  • "German band formed in 2003, Lyriel's musical repertoire ranges from dreamy ballads, a pinch of medieval tunes, to heavy rock songs with elements of classical and Celtic folk music.Distinct, related musical genres merge and become a new, particular style in Lyriel's music.  They distinguish themselves from other bands especially through playing the violin and the cello live on stage, instead of using keyboard-generated strings.The band can play its entire repertoire either as a heavier rock set, or a folky acoustic set, which further highlights the musicians' versatility.Falling somewhere between the pop/folk stylings of the Corrs and the commercial symphonic rock of Within Temptation the opening song 'Numbers' is a pleasent and catchy tune.The next song 'Falling Skies', still retains the commercial pop/rock sound, but this one has a darker and heavier feel.Some full on speed metal with 'Skin And Bones' before moving into some solid rock sounds, a well balanced song between harmony and agression and the use of "real" violin gives this a great lift above the bands who use a keyboard to get this sound.The first version of 'Black And White' has a riff that reminds me of Lacuna Coil's 'Heavens A Lie' and the fact that this one has guest male vocals also adds to that general vibe, however the vocals soon turn to near black metal qualities thus reminding me of Tristania as well.... which is a good thing!Could this next one be a dreaded ballad? Certainly 'Days Had Just Begun' starts that way, and for the most part sounds like an early 'All About Eve' folky ballad, but this one picks up with some simple chord structures and then a great bluesy solo.Have to say that the violin kinda spoils 'Your Eyes' to start with, but the playing gets a little deeper and then the slow moving song speeds up and then starts to rock!Celtic rock meets pop again with 'Dust To Dust', very melodic, very catchy, then its back to the mix of heavy rock and melodic vocals for the next song 'Der Weg' which is performed in their own language.Blimey sounds like Kate Bush, this one really sticks out, just vocals and cello to create a dark and haunting song.'Worth The Fight' is full on guitar riffs backed with some powerful drumming, the vocals simply soar above the music to help create a symphonic rock mini epic.So they do get heavier! Oh yes 'Running In Our Blood' really pumps through the speakers, the vocal pulls the tempo back, then a huge chorus comes in and then, oh yes my dear reader, it fucking goes mental!Ahh it was going so well, then its all nice piano and melodic vocals for a ballad 'Dream Within A Dream', but yes again they pull it back from the brink of boring by allowing the rest of the band to come in and rock it up a bit.We end with the second version of 'Black And White', still sounds like 'Heavens A Lie' to start with, in fact so far sounds the same as the first version, but ahh i get it, they turned down the black metal vocal bit and most of the male vocals have been replaced by female vocals, think i prefer the first version." - Stu's Reviews
    $16.00
  • Great archival discovery! Spettri was an Italian band from the early 70s. They emerged out of the beat scene and went for a more progressive sound. They were obviously influenced by British bands Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, and even Jethro Tull. The band never hit the studio proper. This features recordings that were done live in the studio in 1972 (don't worry the sound quality is fine). Its a conceptual work with some spoken narration. Also featured is some hairy guitar soloing and ripping organ breaks. I'm reminded a bit of Nuova Idea. Recommended to fans of Il Progressivo Rock Italiano.
    $16.00
  • "The Moody Blues returned after a five year hiatus with a very different sounding album. The punk and disco era were now in full flower and such groups as Styx, Journey, and REO Speedwagon were dominating the rock charts. Octave would abandon the cosmic and symphonic sound of the group’s past, and move toward one more in tune with the era. As such it would not stand out as a unique creation as did their core of classic albums.Octave would also be the last album for founding member Mike Pinder. He had always provided a spiritual and in many ways the classical center of their music through his mellotron and chamberlin. Now playing a synthesizer the sound was different and not as grand. Years later it would come to light that he was not pleased with the musical direction of the group. Patrick Moraz would replace him as the group’s keyboardist and tour in support of the album.Octave would have no unifying theme and be the most diffuse album that The Moody Blues had released up until that time. Each song would match the individual personality of its composer.The John Lodge composition, “Steppin’ In A Slide Zone,” was typical of the new sound. It is a typical energetic Lodge rocker but the musical center was the keyboard-guitar interplay which was in vogue at the time. Still it was catchy and was a commercially successful single.Justin Hayward is in ballad mode for this release and while he would not create anything as wonderful or unique as “Nights In White Satin,” his music is still very listenable because of the innate beauty of the songs. “Had To Fall In Love” and “Top Rank Suite” are both very mellow. “Driftwood” is the best of the three as it is a gentle love ballad which was a Hayward trademark by this time.Ray Thomas created two songs for this release. “I’m Your Man” just disappears but “Under Moonshine” contains a strong lead vocal by him plus some classic harmonies by the other members of the group.“One Step Into The Light” would be a final spiritual statement by Mike Pinder and his only composition on the album. The music would be more progressive rock than the grandiose sound of his past as he would bring his Moody Blues career to a conclusion.A fourth Justin Hayward song would close the album. “The Day We Meet Again” would unintentionally or intentionally point toward the future as a new keyboardist was on the way and the grand classical sounds were being left behind.Make no mistake, Octave remains a very good late seventies album but does fall short of the group’s best work. It was different, more modern, and ultimately a transitional work. Despite all that it still remains a good, if not essential, Moody Blues listen today." - Blogcritics.org
    $9.00
  • Ridiculous price...Keith's last solo album with Marc Bonilla was the best, and "proggiest" thing he had done in years - really great stuff. This gig is two hours long and features material drawn from that album as well as ELP material. While I find his guitar work a bit superfluous on the ELP tunes, Marc Bonilla does a fine job on vocals. YEAH!!!! 
    $6.00
  • Slimline set with CD wallets for A Change Of Seasons, Scenes From A Memory, and Octavarium.
    $15.00
  • BLOW OUT PRE-PROGPOWER USA SPECIAL DEAL! Surprisingly great project from one of the founders of Savatage and forefathers of the entire progressive metal movement. To cut to the chase - this sounds more like Savatage than Savatage does these days. A must own for any Savatage fan - you will not be disappointed. LIMITED TIME SPECIAL PRICING
    $8.00
  • Certainly one of the greatest Canterbury albums of all time. 30 years after release Nine Feet Underground still generates shivers. Features 24 bit remastering, new liner notes, and bonus tracks.
    $9.00
  • THEY'RE BAAACCCCKKKK! German band led by Kai Hansen that is virtually synonomous with the phrase "speed metal".
    $12.00