Live! (Blu-Spec CD/Mini-LP Sleeve)

Live! (Blu-Spec CD/Mini-LP Sleeve)

BY Hino, Terumasa Quintet

(Customer Reviews)
$29.00
$ 17.40
SKU: THCD-260
Label:
Think/Three Blind Mice
Category:
Jazz
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The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".

The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.

Terumasa Hino is the legendary Japanese trumpeter who has given us countless amazing sessions since the late 60s.  His work in the 70s channeled the spirit of electric Miles Davis.  This live album from 1973 isn’t plugged in but its searing with white hot energy.  The album consists of three long tracks – the ubiquitous “Stella By Starlight” and two Hino compositions – “Sweet Lullaby” and the 28 minute marathon of “Be And Know”.  The quintet is incredible – Hino has his brother Motohiko on drums, Yoshio Ikeda on bass, the amazing Mikio Masuda on piano, and Yuji Imamura (of Air fame) on percussion.  Simply a sublime album.

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  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.Green Caterpillar has long been a favorite of audiophiles and now fans of kosmigroov have caught on to it.  As a result prices have soared over the years.  Even the old CD reissue goes for $$.The album features Masaru Imada, a jazz pianist of some reknown in Japan.  This features his trio expanded into a quintet with the addition of guitarist Kazumi Watanabe and percussionist Yuji Imamura (see Air).  Typically Imada worked in a standard piano, bass, drum configuration but on this one he really lets his hair down.  Parts of this album feature Imada playing electric keyboards and he's wonderful but the real spice to this lineup is guitarist Watanabe.  The album consists of 4 long tracks.  The title track is the show stopper.  It settles into a funky electric rhythm and then Kazumi lets it rip.  Easily one of the best albums on Three Blind Mice and essential.
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  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hardly be called fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.This was actually the very first release from the Three Blind Mice label back in 1972.  It is also the first album from alto/soprano saxophonist Kosuke Mine.  He had previously played with the great Masabumi Kikuchi but this was his first recordings in which he led his own ensemble.  The quintet also included the amazing Takahask Mizuhashi on bass, Hideo Ichikawa on electric piano, Takashi Imai on trombone, and Hiroshi Murakami on drums.  The album consists of 4 long modal jazz explorations filled with some incredible soloing.  A stunning album that will take you to another dimension. 
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Curious synth winds around exploratory guitar lines as bass and drums — as ever — keep steady, and soon start-stop bass and guitar emerge to set the tone for the song’s first half, contrasted a bit by a heavier “chorus” but never too far away from whence it comes.Named for the probe that was the first to land in the outer region of the solar system — it went to Saturn’s moon Titan, presumably to look for sirens — “Huygens,” also the name of the Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens who first studied Saturn’s rings, splits at about halfway in. This is all the more fitting conceptually, since the Huygens probe was launched with Cassini, which went on to take the farthest-from-Earth photograph that’s ever been taken, shot from Saturn’s orbit. Whether or not that split had anything to do with the music of “Huygens,” I don’t know, but it would be easy to conceive of the descending guitar lines at the song’s midpoint as entry to an atmosphere. 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