Next ($5 Blowout Price!)

SKU: CK34311
Label:
Columbia
Category:
Hard Rock
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"Next is the third album by Journey and was released in 1977.

Journey continued the formula from 1976's Look into the Future but this album also retains some of Journey's progressive rock style from the first album."

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  • "If Metallica and Slayer invented speed metal, Anthrax brought it to the East Coast and imbued it with the attitude and excitement of New York hardcore. Among the Living is, without a doubt, their finest hour--a roaring, adrenaline-pumped collection of flailing beats, precise, razor-edged riffs and shout-along refrains. Unlike most full-throttle metal vocalists of the era, Joey Belladonna chose to sing as well as shout, giving songs like "Among the Living," "Indians" and "Efilnikcufecin" ("nice fuckin' life" spelled backwards) a decided melodic edge. Yet Scott Ian and Dan Spitz's buzzsaw guitar flurries, and Charlie Benante's insistent drumming, prevented the songs from ever degenerating into the run-of-the-mill heavy metal they so despised. "
    $5.00
  • "The road to Altzi is paved with good intentions…. When Masterplan announced the new lineup in November of last year, Jorn apologists flooded the comment strings of various metal news outlets with comments like “another band is spoiled by a vocalist change” and “no Jorn…no Masterplan.” While I might agree that there was reason for outcry when a well-known/respected singer leaves a band, it’s not as if Masterplan has never had another vocalist and is not a band with more past members than present. The object is to listen and make judgments later. The announcement of Rick Altzi was particularly intriguing and any fan of At Vance and Thunderstone can attest – there was much reason for hope.The news that main man/guitarist Roland Grapow’s (Ex-Helloween) revealed that there was going to be a return to “faster” and “more metal” material made this more appealing. Add further still…the addition of Ex-Stratovarius bassist Jari Kainulainen and the naysayers should have stood back and waited to react. Why? As it turned out, Rick Altzi proves a more than compatible replacement for Jorn…and *GASP* dare I say – a wee bit better in spots? Blasphemy? Try it…prove me wrong.Musically, the album ranks as one of the band’s finest, recalling the best heard from the self-titled debut, 2005’s “Aeronautics,” and the appropriately titled 2010 “Time to Be King,” but with a heavier edge. Altzi is so compatible that only the most attentive Jorn fans can see the difference, most notably that low power that shifts with a slab of grit while on the way up to the high range. This is not besmirching Altzi at all, as his range is proven and perfect. His first appearance is at 0:47 on the album’s second track “The Game,” an admirable driving melodic metal song with noticeably well-crafted double bass from new drummer Marthus Skaroupka (Cradle of Filth) and copious amounts of heaviness intertwined with trademark melody. Grapow proves again what amazing solos he can play.The album’s first music video was for “Keep Your Dream Alive” – a mid-paced winner expertly chosen, as it’s the song where Altzi shines brightest, showing the breadth of his range – and for many moments I said “Jorn who?” The finest track on the album is “Betrayal,” which will prove to be one of the best of the year when all is said and done, if not for its Middle Eastern charm that falls into the heaviest riff on the album drawn out like slamming shudders by Axel Mackenrott’s keyboards. Other notables are the appealing riff in “Earth Going Down” (which is a tad swallowed by the keyboards as the song progresses), the Strato-feel of “Black Night of Magic,” the speedier “Return to Avalon” and the never dull 11 minute title track (especially 6:13 to 7:15) and vocal duet of Altzi and Grapow. Highly recommended is the digipak version with bonus tracks “1492” and “Fear the Silence.”My only complaint is not necessarily with the band’s play or its flawless execution, its more the melodic metal style in general. At the same time it represents a favorite style – in Masterplan’s case best defined as “what Whitesnake would sound like if they tipped a bit into power metal” – listening to entire album presents a challenge, if only for that mid-paced repetition. I find the album plays a bit better when I listen to a few songs at a time, mixing it in with other bands and styles.This may be “a new beginning” for Masterplan in member changes, however the creation of high quality melodic metal perseveres. Grapow assembled a new team of musicians that prove just as compatible, especially Altzi’s performance. With the proof in the product, fans of the band should have little to complain about with “Novum Initium,” though I suspect some Jorn lamenters will never take the road less traveled….the one where its “time for” Rick “to be king.”" - Metal Underground
    $15.00
  • Its been quite some time since we've heard from Guy LeBlance and Nathan Mahl.  He's been busy touring with Camel and now having to deal with some serious health related issues.Justify finds Nathan Mahl with a reconstituted lineup.  Guy displays his prodigious keyboard abilities once again but this time he's also playing drums.  The new lineup features a twin guitar attack and bass.  For a keyboard player he sure as hell gives a lot of room for the two guitarists to stretch out and shred.  The album is split about 50/50 between instrumental and vocal oriented tracks.  You can tell his time in Camel has rubbed off on him - just check out the albums finale "Infinite Light".  It features a guest appearance on guitar and keys from none other than Andy Latimer!  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Domestic pressing of the second album from this superb Polish prog band. While their first album tended to veer more towards the metal side, Metafiction is a bit lighter - but only in overall sound, not thematically. There are plenty of heavy moments but lets call it heavy progressive rock as opposed to metal. Whereas Riverside initially drew heavily from bands like Porcupine Tree, Opeth, and Anathema they ultimately found their own voice. Votum find themselves at the same crossroads. These bands are all similar influences emphasizing atmosphere and mood. Melancholy prevails - this is not an upbeat sounding album. The heavy parts may seem heavier because the quiet parts...are well...they are quieter! This adds to the dynamics of the album and overall it draws you right in to an inxoticating dreamscape. Easily one of 2009's best albums. Lets hope with a US release they are able to find an audience here. Highest recommendation.
    $13.00
  • German import arrives in a mediabook with a patch."Our anticipation levels had maxed, as four years passed by since Sanctuary announced that they were releasing a new record. It is easy to imagine that the only going through their fans' minds was whether their new material will resemble the work they did 25 years ago. I was rather reluctant and ultimately, I was right.First things first, let's get some things straight. Is "The Year The Sun Died" close to the feel of their two emblematic records? Nope. Does it sound like Nevermore? Yeah, as Dane's vocals are closer to that type of delivery, without that being a bad thing. He wouldn't risk going back to his old type of delivery, even if he could achieve such levels with pro tools magic. Modern production trends have also played a significant role to the final cut of this album. On the other hand, the composition approach is quite different to that witnessed on Nevermore albums, as musical themes are much more approachable. On the other hand, even though we don't have the outbursts we were used to, there are a number of theme and tempo changes in many of the tracks which make them very interesting indeed.In general, if we were to analyse its style, we would conclude that we are dealing with a rather heavy record that incorporates bulky guitars in mid-tempo layouts, without that meaning that there are no tracks with a faster pace. Lyrically, it is quite dark and a constant claustrophobic atmosphere is always present, as there is no abundance of melodic guitar themes. It's multifaceted compositions do provide a rather "proggy" feeling, but nothing more than that. Sheppard and Budbill's rhythm section is poignant and to the point, but lacks the ingenuity we were used to them providing.Opening tack "Arise And Purify" is clear evidence of the two contradicting elements that comprise this record. The intro riff is heavy and modern, whereas the chorus uses backing vocals that reminds us of their past. Solos by Rutledge and Hull are unleashed from the get go, and are as precise and technical as required. "Let The Serpent Follow Me" is on the up-tempo side of things but winds down during the chorus, followed by a wonderful, nostalgic bridge. The first slow track is "Exitium (Anthem Of The Living)", which starts off with a calm intro and follows with an awesome riff. Dane also performs really well in this track. "Question Existence Fading" follows a similar path of interchanging musical themes. It sets off with a fast, edgy and fierce riff, includes great solos, awesome vocals and thrilling drumming."I Am Low" is one of the calmer moments of the record, which slowly builds up to a rather heartfelt climax. Another highlight would be "Frozen" which again starts off strong and dials things down during the chorus whilst guitar solos are flying around left, right and centre. The weakest moment of the album would be "One Final Day (Sworn To Believe)", whilst "The World Is Wired", which at first won me over with its groovy attitude, ultimately let me down after multiple listens. The strongest moment is definitely the self-titled track (introduced by the wonderfully acoustic "Ad Vitam Aeternam") which concludes the record. Words don't really give it justice. It is slow, heavy and very memorable. Everything from the Latin chants in the beginning of the track to the despair in Warrel's vocals during the chorus and inspiring guitar work makes this song great. A truly great composition.With this release, Sanctuary did what they had to do. They evolved. Now, because it took them 25 years to do so might not go down well with many people who were expecting a second "Into The Mirror Black", which is totally understandable. Having Nevermore in the meantime might have substantially reduced the shock factor anyway. Let us not forget though that one of the reasons why we loved this band is because of their progressiveness (for lack of a better word). It would be silly to assume that they would not have changed tones even if they hadn't disbanded in 1992." - Noisefull
    $14.00
  • Already dubbed "Toddrÿche" by their fans, Queensryche turn back the clock with their new eponymous titled album.  With Geoff Tate given the boot, the band sounds revitalized with the addition of former Crimson Glory vocalist Todd La Torre.  While its not going to supplant Operation: Mindcrime, the sound harkens back to the band's roots.  La Torre was previously a member of a Queensryche cover band so he does a pretty damn fine approximation of Geoff Tate's glory days.  For years fans have been hoping the band would return to their progressive roots and it took this youth injection to get it done.Please note that this is the standard edition.  It comes with a patch and a slipcase.  There will be a deluxe version forthcoming.
    $12.00
  • Second album from this great Italian progressive power metal band, who's career was launched by Sensory Records. Most of the material is written by drummer Ivan Moni Bidin but the real star of the band is vocalist Marco Sandron. He has great range and clarity that is some ways reminds a bit of Andre Matos. Pathosray don't stalk new ground but any fan of melodies mixed with crunchy metallic heaviness needs to check these guys out. Quickly becoming one of the best bands in the genre...a
    $8.00
  • "Live In Tokyo is a live performance from November 14, 2012 at Zepp Tokyo for supergroup PSMS, which features drummer Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater, The Winery Dogs, Transatlantic), bassist Billy Sheehan (Talas, Mr. Big, David Lee Roth), guitarist Tony MacAlpine & keyboardist Derek Sherinian (Black Country Communion, Dream Theater, Billy Idol). This 95 minute concert showcases a wide range of instrumental performances from each of the members careers & collaborations. Included in the set are Shy Boy from Sheehan's band Talas, MacAlpine's The Stranger, Sherinian's Apocalypse 1470 B.C. and Dream Theater's A Change Of Seasons: The Crimson Sunrise."
    $14.00
  • "There are some bands that have a feel of “going through the motions” when releasing new albums, either relying on successes of previous efforts or generally uninspired by the process. Then there are bands that put every bit of energy, heart, and soul into each and every album driven by a desire to create stronger material, never lazing under the notion that albums “can’t get any better than ‘x’ release.”Ever since 2003, Swiss folk metal act Eluveitie has been captivating with every release, as if the word “monumental” was ingrained in the band's genes. It’s not simply because of its Celtic roots, or the combination of melody with that splash of extreme, or the use of what seems like hundreds of instruments (most of which you can't pronounce), but also the amount of blood that runs through the songs like veins inside each album. There is energy with every album that transcends the boundaries of just being music….it’s a blanket that warms, a beer that satiates, a lover that satisfies, a book that creates worlds, and music that emotes. “Origins” might just be the best album in the band’s history and clearly is a top contender for 2014.Eluveitie also has the distinction of being one of the few groups that has the ability to inspire fans to delve deeper into the historical content of each release, especially after witnessing a live performance. It’s one thing to live in the comfort of a well-produced album with the ability to perfect the sound, but once you see this band in a live setting – meticulously re-creating the sound of the recorded masterpiece note for note, instrument for instrument with deadly precision – the true beauty shines through. Only by visualizing this culmination of what must be a motherload of practice and effort that has led to perfect timing and execution will you then have complete appreciation for how much this band gives a shit about its craft. Calling it extraordinary seems so ordinary.“Origins” expounds upon the formula blazed in “Helveitos,” but harkens a bit back to the days of “Slania,” with much higher production values. I was a bit perplexed by a backlash from some critics of “Helveitos” who cited a rather startling “lack of originality,” so it wouldn’t be a shock to see “Origins” met with similar caterwauling. More astounding is trying to comprehend exactly what the expectation level is given the history of Eluveitie since “Evocation” was released in 2008. With “Origins” you can brace yourself for much greater Celtic “origins,” more bagpipes and flutes, and more participation from Anna Murphy, who has now become just as indispensable as Chrigel.There is plenty of “Slania” here to keep the “trve fans” satisfied – check out “Inception,” “King,” “Carry the Torch,” or “The Silver Sister.” For those that also love intricate and pulse generating Celtic melodies with more flutes, tin whistles, and Gaitas than you will ever find at a Riverdance show, all reinforced by Chrigel’s death grows and interlaced with Anna Murphy’s astounding voice – look no further than tracks like “Celtos,” “From Darkness,” “The Nameless,” “Sucellos” and what sounds like the sequel to “A Rose for Epona” – “The Call of the Mountains.” The only chink in the otherwise perfect armor is the swiftness that this album passes, even though it clocks in at 52 minutes, not including intros (58 with). I suddenly wished for an hour and a half, knowing it will probably be too long.In the end, Eluvetie raised it's stock higher, carving a greater niche and ascending a crowded folk metal scene. In what will surely be a fiddle fight death match with bands like Elvenking and Equilibrium, Eluveitie may just be the strongest contender this year, barring no subgenre. “Origins” will astound the faithful as well as garner more critics desiring “something different.” The fact remains….what Eluveitie does is in of itself “something different” and “Origins” may be the best effort yet." - Metal Underground
    $16.00
  • One of the all time great psych monsters back in print.  The Dream was a one and one band from Norway.  They recorded this one album in 1967.  One of the primary reasons this album is so desireable is that the lead guitarist is none other than Terje Rypdal!  Its a period sounding piece - you can tell this is the late 60s but damn if it isn't as well done as anything else from this time.  Rypdal displays an obvious influence from Hendrix.  He completely blows it out on this album.  Plenty of Hammond organ grinding away in the background.  Lyrics are pretty stupid - the opening track is actually called 'Green Things (From Outer Space)" but it doesn't matter.  The music is a typical mixture of styles but mostly bluesy stuff with a real hard edge.  Rypdal's guitarwork is purely lethal.  After this album the band split and Rypdal headed off into jazz realms with the Min Bul album, this solo album Bleak House, and then his long running career with ECM.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • "First time ever CD release in Europe of "Canterbury" - Diamond Head's third album . Recorded and released in 1983, reached Number 32 on the UK Album Chart. Diamond Head are a British heavy metal band formed in 1976 in Stourbridge, England. Re-release includes bonus tracks: extended version of "Makin' Music", 1 live track plus an interview. New digipak edition, limited to numerated 2000 copies."
    $15.00
  • This is one of the better prog rock albums I've heard to come out of Germany in some time. Second album from Invertigo is modern sounding - I guess this is what neoprog has evolved into. Normally I don't go for this sort of thing but its really well done progressive rock that occasionally touches on an old school vibe. Fans of Sylvan will go nuts for this band. Check out the 22 minute closer "The Memoirs Of A Mayfly" - some nice echoes of The Flower Kings and Genesis creep in. If you are into a more contemporary progressive rock sound there's a good chance you'll find this one essential and probably one of your favs for 2012.
    $15.00
  • Second album to feature John Wetton. This is part of the Sanctuary/Castle Expanded De-Luxe Edition series. The following bonus cuts are featured:1. Name Of The Game (previously unreleased)2. Sundown (alt. version)3. Weep In Silence (previously unreleased extended version)4.Name Of The Game (demo)5. Does Anything Matter (demo)6. I Close My Eyes (demo)7. Take Care (demo)8. Can't Keep A Good Band Down (demo)
    $15.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of a remastered edition of the 1979 album by the Canadian Progressive Rock group FM, Surveillance . The band began life in 1976 with CAMERON HAWKINS (Synthesisers, Bass, Vocals) and NASH THE SLASH (Jeff Plewman) (Electric Violin, Mandolin, Vocals) coming together as a duo, making an appearance on national TV in Canada in the Summer of 1976. By March 1977 FM became a trio with the addition of MARTIN DELLAR on Drums. The band s debut album followed. By the end of the year Nash the Slash had been replaced by BEN MINK on Electric Violin and Mandolin. Surveillance was the third album by the band, released in 1979, and was a hit of the Progressive Rock genre in the USA and Canada. This Esoteric Recordings release is the first time Surveillance has been issued in Europe and has been newly remastered and includes an illustrated booklet and a new essay."
    $17.00