Pangaea Ultima

Pangaea Ultima

BY Moore, Steve

(Customer Reviews)
$17.00
$ 10.20
SKU: SP032CD
Label:
Spectrum Spools
Category:
Electronic
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Latest solo album from the quite prolific keyboardist associated with Zombi and Titan.  This is heavily sequenced Berlin School electronics that owes a huge debt to 1980s Tangerine Dream.  There are some ocassional rhythmic beats that turn up but nothing too out of the realm of the genre.  Late night space music.  Bliss out!

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  • Second album from this outstanding new Italian band performing in the "Rock Progressivo Italiano" style.  Their debut La Crudelta Di Aprile blew me away and this new one is coming on like a sledgehammer.  The quartet is led by keyboardist Emanuele Tarasconi who pulls all kinds of vintage keys out of the closet.  Guitars figure a bit more prominently this time around and again there is a guest violinist.  The focal point tends to always drift back to Tarasconi's keys which have a style that reminds of Toni Pagliuca's work with Le Orme.  There are Italian vocals on the album but there are really long stretches of instrumental passages to the point that the vocals are inconsequential.  If you liked their first album you are going to love this one.  BUY OR DIE! 
    $16.00
  • One of the great Italian prog albums from the 70s.
    $14.00
  • Yet another brilliant work from this Norwegian prog band.  The Greatest Show On Earth is the band's third effort.  While the first album Identity delved into alternative/prog realms bearing similarity to Radiohead, their second album All Rights Removed was full on Pink Floyd worship.  This latest effort carries on in similar fashion.  There are parts of the album that were written with tracing paper.  It evokes the mood and feel of Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and maybe even a bit of The Wall.  This isn't to say the band doesn't inject any personality of their own - they do.  There are contemporary elements, its just that when they go into full on Pink Floyd mode its so apparent and so well executed that it blinds you to everything else that is going on.  What Bi Kyon Ran is to King Crimson or The Watch is to Genesis, Airbag is to Pink Floyd.  Original?  Truth be told not really.  It doesn't matter, its so well executed that you will just immerse yourself in the listening experience.  Highly recommended.
    $17.00
  • "Walter Becker and Donald Fagen were remarkable craftsmen from the start, as Steely Dan's debut, Can't Buy a Thrill, illustrates. Each song is tightly constructed, with interlocking chords and gracefully interwoven melodies, buoyed by clever, cryptic lyrics. All of these are hallmarks of Steely Dan's signature sound, but what is most remarkable about the record is the way it differs from their later albums. Of course, one of the most notable differences is the presence of vocalist David Palmer, a professional blue-eyed soul vocalist who oversings the handful of tracks where he takes the lead. Palmer's very presence signals the one major flaw with the album -- in an attempt to appeal to a wide audience, Becker and Fagen tempered their wildest impulses with mainstream pop techniques. Consequently, there are very few of the jazz flourishes that came to distinguish their albums -- the breakthrough single, "Do It Again," does work an impressively tight Latin jazz beat, and "Reelin' in the Years" has jazzy guitar solos and harmonies -- and the production is overly polished, conforming to all the conventions of early-'70s radio. Of course, that gives these decidedly twisted songs a subversive edge, but compositionally, these aren't as innovative as their later work. Even so, the best moments ("Dirty Work," "Kings," "Midnight Cruiser," "Turn That Heartbeat Over Again") are wonderful pop songs that subvert traditional conventions and more than foreshadow the paths Steely Dan would later take." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Disc 1, “Machine de plaisir”: The original tape of had the working title "Meditation 2" and this long track was also recorded in 1993 for the "Guttemplers”, same as “The Music Box” in LVE 12. The feeling for time is so basic for Klaus' work. His beat is as alive as his breathing. His rhythm is both, continually attentive and exceptionally well integrated, as you can hear in large parts of this track. There is a feeling of unhurriedness in his work and yet there is intensity underneath and through it all.Disc 2: “Arthur Stanley Jefferson” was recorded in February 1993 in KS' studio. Originally, it was the third free tape for the "Guttemplers”. “Himmel und Erde”, recorded by Klaus in January 1993, was first released on a Russian limited edition CD sampler in the same year, and seven years later I put it among the “Lone Tracks”, the last of the fifty CDs of The Ultimate Edition. Also from1993, “Vas Insigne Electionis” was especially done for a planned sampler, but not used then. One year later it was given for free to the Dutch KLEM organisation, who did a limited edition CD sampler for their members. Six years later I also added it to the “Lone Tracks” of The Ultimate Edition. The very short track “Tag des offenen Denkmals” (Heritage Open Days) was done as tv trailer for a tv documentary on account of the European Heritage Days. Klaus recorded it on the 21st of July 1993. This small piece was first included in our Jubilee Edition set in 1997.Disc 3: ”Borrowed Time” was played and recorded by Klaus in 1993 and completed and mixed in April 1994 at his studio. The reason for doing this long music was because of the work on the soundtrack for the American-Hungarian movie "Living on Borrowed Time”. Just a few minutes of the music were actually used in the film (as well as some special - shorter - cuts, released as “Angry Young Moog” in Jubilee Edition). Normally, Klaus is not a man for short tracks, so for “Borrowed Time” he started to play, and as so often, he got lost, forgetting completely about the movie and its need for short pieces. Luckily he had not just played but also recorded the whole thing, and then he mixed and stored it... and three years after I could use it in Jubilee Edition.
    $21.00
  • "With 'Home', for the first time since their critically acclaimed 'Posthumous Silence' of 2006, Sylvan have taken the chance to create another full-on concept album. Even though the Hamburg natives attach great importance to creating contextually comprehensive pieces of art with any of their albums, this time around Sylvan have upped their ambition another notch and taken on the mammoth task of building an overall concept around the never ending quest of the human condition for 'home' - that very special place that can provide a feeling of complete safety."This is the deluxe mediabook edition.  Same track listing as the jewel box but in much nicer packaging.
    $17.00
  • This is the most enjoyable Devin Townsend album I've heard in years.  Townsend definitely walks to the beat of a different drummer and is constantly confounding his listeners.  Epicloud is no different.  The album is actually catchy in a poppy way but still plenty of metal elements.  The production is purely epic in nature - reverb gone wild!  Townsend mainly sings with a clean voice but even when he dirties it up its swimming in 'verb so his voice takes on an otherworldly quality.  He's complemented by the great Anneke van Giersbergen who appears through out - mainly as a backing vocalist but at times singing lead lines.  So what we have here is something I really didn't expect - a hook filled metal album that neatly collides with dream pop.
    $12.00
  • Fifth album from the Polish prog band led by former Collage guitarist Mirek Gil.  The band clearly goes for a contemporary sound.  There are overt similarities to Riverside but the music has a more symphonic rock side.  I've always enjoyed Gil's guitar tone.  He plays with quite an expressive style.  In this case its nicely augmented by violin and keys.  Lots of prog coming from Poland.  Believe is one of the better bands to emerge from that scene.
    $15.00
  • "Death.Taxes.Ozric Tentacles.Since 1984 this loose collective have been releasing reliably great music from the mind of leader Ed Wynne. Their margin of error is enviably tiny – there is no such thing as a bad Ozrics album. Sure, some are better than others, but the body of work is as inescapably consistent as mortality and societal contributions. Technicians of the Sacred is their fifteenth studio album, second double album and the first release in this format since Erpland in 1990. It is also one of the best they have ever recorded.The blend of electronica and inner-space rock is instantly recognisable with ‘The High Pass’. World music and gently undulating synths take their time to ease us back into the required frame of cosmic consciousness. It takes almost 6 minutes for the secret weapon, Wynne’s signature lysergic lead guitar, to be deployed and that is the modus operandi of the whole album – nothing is rushed, each track unfolds lotus-like.‘Changa Masala’ distils all the band’s ingredients into a spicy side-dish. Sequencers, vocal samples and a reggae skank provide the base while acoustic guitar rips like a John McLaughlin solo, interjecting a nod to their past, a musical in-joke for the fans, which I won’t spoil for those who haven’t yet heard it.The Steve Hillage (Gong, System 7 and sometime Ozrics collaborator) influence is foregrounded in the first disc’s closer, ‘Switchback’. Tap-delay guitar slithers over a web of ambient keyboard washes. Portamento bass notes slide and glide their way through the patchouli-scented psychedelic haze.f the first disc was an aromatic treat, then the second is manna. ‘Epiphlioy’ recalls the classic ‘Saucers’. Its serpentine twelve-string acoustic riffs employ Eastern modes to evoke a scene that is paradoxically earthy and otherworldly. Staccato strings conjure Kashmir while a celestial orchestra of whooshing keyboard pads threatens to levitate us into the stratosphere and beyond. We are back in the bizarre bazaar, folks. Brandi Wynne pins down the ethereal mix with a heavy dub bassline. The track changes constantly. This is the most compositionally complex music the band has ever produced.While there are references to Ozric history and a more organic feel similar to early classics with the occasional use of non-electric instruments and ethnic voices, the album as a whole is a step forward. The painstakingly crafted symbiosis of synthesised sounds and rock instrumentation, coupled with a slick production, lend Technicians of the Sacred a holistic integrity not heard since Jurassic Shift (which incidentally entered the UK charts at a very respectable number 11 in 1993). The whole gels together and flows with the multi-layered sophistication of a symphony while retaining some of the jam-band aesthetic of the free festival days.‘Smiling Potion’ features interlocking sequences even Tangerine Dream would be proud of and a tribal metronome-sense beat straight out of Peter Gabriel’s soundtrack for The Last Temptation of Christ.As ‘Rubbing Shoulders With The Absolute’ throbs along on a blissed-out dub rhythm artificially generated voices ensure the weirdness meter is kept firmly in the red.Hungarian drummer Balázs Szende makes his first studio appearance and throughout the album he proves to be a superb addition to the group, whether approximating the tight programmed style of The Hidden Step era or, as on the closing track, ‘Zenlike Creature’, tackling elusive prog time signatures with ease and finesse. As Ed Wynne winds up a solo worthy of fusion maestros Mahavishnu Orchestra he introduces a shimmering Hillage-esque repeating motif that stays in the mind long after the music has stopped.Technicians of the Sacred, for all its dynamic shifts and intricacies, is a very chilled-out release, one for relaxing to and for transportation to the other, wherever that may be. There are no jarring wig-out rock guitar hero sections or all-out sonic attacks like ‘The Throbbe’. Rather this is Ozric Tentacles’ most cohesive and accomplished effort in almost 20 years and a highlight of a long and peerless career." - Echoes And Dust
    $13.00
  • "Originating from traditional folk music, Bröselmaschine were formed in Duisburg in autumn 1968, and were fronted by renowned guitarist, theorist and writer Peter Bursch. The original band, who were inspired by Pentangle (their quote, not ours) and European folk musics, played a mixture of all sorts of cultures. They wrapped vibrant songs in a hybrid of folk, Indian music, psychedelic rock and cosmic musics, all fused together to form a delicate spacious folk-fusion of great beauty. Their style was characterised by Jenni Schücker, who has a most sensual vocal style ideally suited to such music, all ready to wisp us off to the clouds with the "heads flying by" - to quote the surreal psychedelic lyrics of the opening "Gedanken". With the exception of "Lassie" (a minor low-point, being a traditional folk song) BRÖSELMASCHINE is a delightful album, trippy and otherworldly, stylishly Teutonic cosmic folk, not least so in the addition of Dieter Dierks spooky Mellotron, sitars, zither, tablas, and the like. It all adds up to an ideal companion to Emtidi's SAAT or Hölderlin's TRAUM." - The Crack In The Cosmic Egg
    $15.00
  • "Almost 40 years after its critical and commercial ascent, the progressive rock sub-genre known as “Krautrock” continues to intrigue and excite listeners. At its height in the mid-1970s, the German-based phenomena counted bands like Can, Kraftwerk, Amon Düül, and Cluster at the forefront of the experimental, largely electronic-based musical revolution. Formed in 1970, Guru Guru was one of many memorable bands from the era, and for almost a decade and with several albums, they exploded the expectations of what music could be.Mani Neumeier – Guru Guru singer, keyboardist, and drummer – it still kicking around and making mad music, and he has teamed up with multi-instrumentalist Jürgen Engler of German industrial noisemakers Die Krupps and bassist Scott Telles of the band ST 37 for a new project called Guru Freakout. On September 2nd, 2014 Cleopatra Records will release Mothership, the debut album from Guru Freakout.     In a press release for the new album, Engler tells how the band was formed. “Mani is an old friend of mine,” he says. “Near the end of 2012, he came to visit me in Austin where I had organized a show for him to play. We also planned to do some recording for a follow up project to Cosmic Couriers' Other Places, which was released on Cleopatra in the ‘90s.”“At the same time,” says Engler, “I was working with bass player Scott Telles of ST 37, and when Scott heard that Mani was in town, he wanted to meet him since he had always been a big fan of Guru Guru. So the three of us got together at his rehearsal studio and started jamming right away. We had a great chemistry, so we decided to record a few tracks with a little digital recorder, and also at Ohm Recording Studio. When we listened to the tracks later, we realized that we had some really good material that should see the light of day, and so those recordings became the Guru Freakout album.”The album features two lengthy free-form jams, including the 30+ minute “Notre Dame (Mothership)” and the extended-length “The Snows of Mt. Bonnell,” which takes up the other side of the album’s vinyl release. Both songs feature Engel’s hypnotic, psychedelic blues guitar; Neumeier’s thundering percussion; and Telles’ throbbing bass lines that, when woven together, create some tasty “stoner rock grooves” (sez the press release). The CD release of Mothership includes three bonus tracks, including studio rehearsals of “A Little Bit Spacier” and “Elektrolurch-Mutation,” as well as a live version of “Elektrolurch-Mutation.” If you’re up for taking a ride through the cosmos, Guru Freakout might be what you’re looking for!" - That Devil Music
    $14.00
  • Amplifier are a trio from Manchester. They are also one of the bands at the forefront of the contemporary progressive rock scene. The Octopus is their third album - an expansive 2 hour epic spread out over two discs. The band's first two albums (and EP) were on SPV. They are now working on their own. While their last album, Insider, was a bit more commercial, The Octopus finds the band in their full blown progressive/space rock mode. Pink Floyd and Porcupine Tree come to mind - not in an overt way - more so in general terms of mood and feel. Some nice heavy guitar crunch mixes with dreamy tripped out passages for a solid dynamic listening experience. One of the best things I've heard in a long time. Highly recommended.
    $21.00
  • Here's a new band that will give avant prog fans a screaming orgasm.  Rhun are a French ensemble.  Their music quite effectively captures the essence of Magma, RIO, and Canterbury.  That's just the first song!!  "The musicians offer an interesting and vivid mosaic of predominantly Canterbury, Zeuhl, Jazz, RIO, and (Kraut)Rock. Beside two guitars, bass, drum, percussion and thrown in sounds, two horn players bring lively colors on sax, bassoon, clarinet and flute in this complex mix. The two singers act in a more avant-garde way as for example Magma. People interested in above mentioned styles should have fun." 
    $18.00
  • 4 Destinies is the third album from Italian keyboardist Alex Carpani.  Its clear from this album that he has a great love for old school prog and "Rock Progressivo Italiano".  This is a concept album that consists of 4 epic length pieces.  Carpani's keyboard work shifts from the delicacy of Tony Banks to the pyrotechnics of Keith Emerson.  This is very much a symphonic rock album - plenty of Mellotron and Hammond organ through out.  Carpani handles vocals along with Joe Zal.  I'm not sure who is singing which parts but one of these guys reminds me a bit of Bernardo Lanzetti.  The lyrics shift between Italian and English.  Carpani has assembled an interesing band that includes The Watch guitarist Ettore Salati and drummer Alessandro Di Caprio of Ubi Maior.  A higher profile guest is ex-VDGG saxophonist supreme David Jackson.  Highly recommended."4 Destinies is a progressive rock concept album composed by Alex Carpani and based on 4 eventual destinies that a man can find on the path of his life. Four destinies that irradiate, moving from the same point, in four different directions of life...Musically speaking, this album represent a further step ahead in Carpani’s music production with more space for lyrics and vocals and less virtuoustic passages, with more atmospheric and contemporary rock moments compare to the previous works, even if Carpani’s symphonic songwriting is well recognizable, as well as his keyboards complex textures.The project involved all members of ACB: Ettore Salati on guitars, GB Giorgi on bass, Alessandro Di Caprio on drums and Joe Sal on additional vocals, plus David Jackson as special guest, and has been produced by Cristiano Roversi (Moongarden, John Wetton Band, Submarine Silence, CCLR). The album has been released by british label Festival Music, part of F2 Music Ltd."
    $16.00