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SKU: 314534635
Label:
Mercury
Category:
Progressive Rock
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The band gave Terry Brown the boot as producer. Peter Collins came in and kicked the band's ass a bit. The tunes are a bit more progressive sounding but radio fodder like "The Big Money" made these guys trillions.  Remastered edition.

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  • "EXPEDITION DELTA is a project from Srdjan Brankovic, one of the founders of ALOGIA, the biggest selling progmetal band in Serbia. After the huge success of their 2 albums and tours opening for Whitesnake, Apocalyptica, Savatage and Paul Di Anno, Srdjan decided to do a no holds barred progrock/metal album in English, assembling some of the worlds finest players and EXPEDITION DELTA is the result.Together with Srdjan Brankovic, many famous and great musicians are involved with the \"Expedition Delta\" album. Some of them are Gary Wehrkamp (Shadow Gallery), Andrea De Paoli (Labyrinth), Richard Andersson (Time Requiem), Erik Norlander (Rocket Scientists), Joost van den Broek (Sfter Forever), Sabine Edelsbacher (Edenbridge), Torsten Roehre (Silent Force), Santiago Dobles (Aghora) and many others...The whole album is sung by Nikola Mijic with the exception of 3 songs that include the appearance of Sabine Edelsbacher, Irina Kapetanovic and Aleksandra Jankovic in a duet with Nikola.The album was recorded and produced by Srdjan in his Paradox Music studio where he works with many other Serbian bands. The cast of the album includes:Srdjan Brankovic (Alogia)Nikola Mijic (Alogia)Gary Wehrkamp (Shadow Gallery, Amaran's Plight)Sabine Edelsbacher (Edenbridge)Erik Norlander (Rocket Scientists, Lana Lane)Vladimir Djedovic (Alogia)Richard Andersson (Time Requiem, Space Odyssey)Andrea De Paoli (Labyrinth)Joost van den Broek (After Forever)Santiago Dobles (Aghora)Alex ArgentoTorsten Roehre (Silent Force)Rene Merkelbach (Ayreon)Borislav MiticVivien Lalu (Lalu)Miroslav Brankovic (Alogia) Ivan Vasic (Alogia) Irina Kapetanovic (Irina & Storm) Mikkel Henderson (Evil Masquerade, Circusmind) Alexandra Jankovic
    $3.00
  • "Kiko Loureiro is the guitar virtuoso from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. At 19, Loureiro joined the metal band, Angra in 1991. In 2005, Loureiro released his first solo album, No Gravity. Loureiro started a project called Neural Code in 2009 with drummer Cuca Teixeira and bassist Thiago Espirito Santo. He has maintained a successful career both with his band and as a solo performer releasing seven studio albums with Angra and three solo albums. Loureiro has now released his forth solo studio album, Sounds Of Innocence.With his fourth studio album, Loureiro takes influences from jazz, blues, traditional Brazilian music, and mixes it with progressive metal to create an album full of fresh sounds while remaining true to his progressive metal roots. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati provide bass and drums for Sounds Of Innocence.Within the first few seconds of “Gray Stone Gateway” you can see why Loureiro has been ranked as one of the top guitarists in the world. He provides some amazing guitar solos throughout this song. The solos are performed at incredible speeds, and should really be listened to fully appreciate. Felipe Andreoli and Virgil Donati do a good job at keeping up with this pace to make for a full energy song.“El Guajiro” has a heavier and metal feeling than some of the other songs. Donati does an excellent job on drums on this song, and Andreoli helps to give this song a truly metal sound with his deep bass playing. Louriero is, of course, excellent on this song, playing amazing techniques that almost boggles the mind to hear. Also of note, this song contains traditional Brazilian rhythm instruments being played that help to keep the song fresh.The more progressive rock sounding, “Mãe D'Água,” is a great instrumental track that showcases Loureiro’s guitar abilities as well as several other instruments. Loureiro plays slower solos on this track, but still articulates his message very well using jazz influences to create a great rock song. Donati and Andreoli provide great accompaniment to Loureiro’s guitar sounds.Kiko Loueiro is one of the best guitar players alive, and with Sounds Of Innocence he shows that he will only continue to get better as time goes by. His latest album is a great piece of progressive metal art. Anybody who loves amazing guitar skills should check out Kiko Loueiro. You won’t be disappointed with Sounds Of Innocence." - Prog Rock Music Talk
    $13.00
  • In early 2014, Premiata Forneria Marconi (PFM) performed a series of concerts in Japan - doing complete run throughs of their classic albums.  This live recording captures their performance of L'Isola Di Niente (which some of you may know in its bastardized form as The World Became The World).  To the best of my knowledge some of these tunes have never been performed live before.  So who's left in PFM after all these years?  Franz Di Ciocco is still the drummer and he also handles vocals.  Patrick Djivas is a monster bassist.  Franco Mussida handles guitars.  The trio are augmented by Lucio Fabbri on violin (he has ducked in and out of the band over the years), Alessandro Scaglione on keyboards, and a second drummer in Roberto Gualdi. 
    $19.00
  • "Periphery have been an omnipresent force in the prog metalcore realm since their first album released in 2010 – band founder Misha Mansoor has served as producer on several of the genre’s albums, and the other members are all famous in their own right, whether it’s simply for their craft (Matt Halpern), their involvement in other projects (Spencer Sotelo, Mark Holcomb, Nolly Getgood), or just simply being the nephew of someone exceedingly famous (Jake Bowen). This makes whatever they decide to do extremely important, and the band’s decision to release a concept double album has created hype of hugelargic proportions. In my humble opinion, the band has delivered on all fronts, but not without some disappointments in the “could’ve been” area.Since their inception, Periphery have changed from a chugga-chug ambidjent project posting demos on the internet in the late 2000s to a full-fledged prog metal band with heavy elements of metalcore, post-hardcore, and pop music in general. If you weren’t onboard for “Periphery II”, “Juggernaut” likely won’t change your mind (unless your issues were relatively small), as it’s more of the same poppy atmosphere and less of the techy downtuned riffs, though god knows THOSE are still around. But there’s also a lot of style experimentation – jazz fusion, death metal, and various forms of electronica are all utilized on a semi-normal basis, and range from being seamlessly integrated into the music to being tacked on to the ends of songs like gluing a top-rate dildo onto an already particularly throbby penis. If this all sounds a bit schizophrenic, rest assured that the songcraft is, for the most part, tighter than it’s ever been. Singles from Alpha like “22 Faces” and “Alpha” itself show off Periphery’s pop prowess with choruses and hooks that refuse to leave your head, and complex riffs that are somehow just as ‘wormy as the vocals. And the songs on Omega are longer, more complex, and still manage to be as infectious as the most annoying of STDs – even the twelve minute sprawling title track that has more in common with the bombastic riffs of Periphery I has a shapely middle section that rivals even the hottest of…ugh, fuck it, done with the metaphors. It’s just insane. I cried when I heard it.And now onto what I don’t care for; first off, the decision to split the album into two parts was definitely well-informed from a marketing standpoint. Most people don’t go around listening to 80 minute records all day, myself included, and the supposedly delicate structure of a concept album also means that listening to Juggernaut by skipping to different songs would devalue the experience. So the band broke it into two records to make it seem more manageable to listen to in daily life. Another stated reason was so that newcomers to the band would be able to buy Alpha at a discounted price, decide if they liked it, and then purchase Omega if they were so inclined (music previewing doesn’t work like that anymore, but hey you can’t fault the band for trying to turn that into tangible record sales). The problem I have is that Omega isn’t really paced to be its own album, which makes releasing it on its own instead as simply as the second disc in a package a little pointless. It’s not like the excellent “The Afterman” double albums from Coheed and Cambria, which were each albums that worked in their own right. I realize that this is really just semantics, but I think calling Juggernaut both the third and fourth album from Periphery, while technically correct, is just disingenuous, and judging them fairly on their own as separate albums is impossible (which is why all reviews being published are including them together).Periphery has always had a unique way of pacing their albums, regularly including playful, sometimes relatively lengthy interludes between tracks. Juggernaut is no different, and these interludes are now occasionally used to seed songs that will appear later on the album, or provide callbacks to tracks already present. The transitions aren’t always elegant however, and can range from grin-inducing to head-scratching to just plain grating. Thankfully, the band isn’t going for the illusion that each song flows seamlessly into the next, at least no more than they were going for it on any of their previous albums, and it’s easy to get used to everything given multiple listens.Overall, Juggernaut is a dense album that’s going to take a myriad of listens to fully sink in, just like most of the band’s prior releases (I don’t think anyone is gonna argue that “Clear” has any depth that you would find after about the fifth listen or so, but hey hey that’s ok kay). But it’s also accessible on the surface with deceptively simple rhythms and poppy choruses, which draw you in to appreciate the deeper cuts. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes unique and thoughtful music in the post-hardcore, metalcore, and progressive metal genres, but I’d also recommend it to anyone ever, because this is my absolute favorite band and I think they’ve created a masterpiece. So take from that what you will, and then get the fuck out of here. The play button is calling my name." - iprobablyhateyourband.com
    $11.00
  • A lifetime ago The Laser's Edge reissued this fine offshoot from Circus.  Its been out of print for years and has now been resurrected by Belle Antique.Blue Motion consisted of Fritz Hauser (drums/percussion), Stephan Greider (keys), and Stephan Ammann (keys).  This was one of the first (if not the first) digital recordings made in Switzerland.  With little to no overdubs, the recording has a live, spacious feel.  The two keyboardists play off of one another in dizzying fashion - it can become hypnotic at times.  Bosendorfer Imperial grand piano, ARP Quadra, Hammond C3, Fender Rhodes, and Hohner Clavinet was their arsenal and they played the hell out of them.  Hauser is an exemplary percussionist and he never gets lost in the fray.  Parts of this may actually remind you of ELP a little bit...but just a little bit.  Highly recommended.
    $34.00
  • One of my favorite albums from Threshold. Damian Wilson is a real standout and the music's subtle celtic underpinning give the album a distinct flavor. New edition comes with 3 bonus tracks.
    $18.00
  • New edition arrives in a fancy super jewel box. The album has been remixed and remastered by Steven Wilson in 5.1 surround. The 5.1 DVD-Audio disc also features 2 bonus tracks taken from these sessions as well as a video clip.
    $15.00
  • "Royal Hunt’s “Double Live In Japan” is a compilation drawn from two different live albums. The first disc in the set features highlights from “1996 Live”, from the “Moving Target” tour. This was the first tour with D.C. Cooper on lead vocals, with material from the first three Royal Hunt albums. Selections from “Moving Target”, D.C.’s vocal debut; and the first recorded versions of D.C. singing material from “Land Of Broken Hearts” and“Clown In The Mirror”. The second disc is the entire “Closing The Chapter”album, which was a very limited edition, version of the “Paradox” live stage show.The core of the music is provided by composer and keyboard wizard Andre Andersen. By combining his classical background with a love of hard rock, Andre creates a dynamic range of melodic progressive metal. Steen Mogensen also comes from a classical background in addition to adding his vast experience playing bass with a number of Scandinavian hard rock bands. Jacob Kjoer, one of the best session guitarists in Denmark, has been with the band ever since he was asked to play on one of the group’s early recording sessions. D.C. Cooper (the American connection in the group, from Pittsburgh PA) rounds out the quartet with his powerful vocal and performing skills.In the live setting Royal Hunt bring an incredible energy to their material, feeding off the appreciative Japanese fans who fill stadiums to witness the spectacle of a full blown stage show. The electricity of the event is captured on these two different tours, and presented for the first time to American fans.Royal Hunt is something of a phenomenon because they have established themselves as legitimate “stars” in global markets outside of America. In Japan, they are recognized as a major act and their reputation is growing quickly throughout Europe. Now, America gets exposed to the music that has sold almost a million copies worldwide."
    $16.00
  • Sezione Frenante are not young guys.  Apparently they've been kicking around since the first half of the 70s but with no recorded output.  They opened for some of the Italian prog bands of the day and then went on hiatus...until now.  This is a concept album based on the life of poet Dante Alighieri and the material was conceived back in the early days of the band.  Sonically it doesn't have the 70s imprint that a lot of the retro bands go for but compositionally it fits squarely in the "Rock Italiano Progressivo" mold.  So we are talking about music composed in the 70s and recorded today.  To my ears the production is quite excellent - it almost has a live in the studio feel.  The closest comparison would be to Le Orme which is not surprising given the band's long friendship with Aldo Tagliapietra.  All of the musicians in the band are quite good and have plenty of room to solo.  The star for me is vocalist Francesco Nardo.  He has good range and fits neatly in with the music.  Nothing operatic - just right.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Dulcima is the second album from this transplanted Brit now living in Norway. Once again he has assembled a cast of musicians entrenched in the Scandinavian prog rock scene - White Willow, Wobbler, and Anglagard are all represented quite well here. Don't expect sprawling prog epics - this is languid art rock that treads similar ground to David Sylvian's solo work with a touch of post rock tossed in for good measure.
    $9.00
  • Already dubbed "Toddrÿche" by their fans, Queensryche turn back the clock with their new eponymous titled album.  With Geoff Tate given the boot, the band sounds revitalized with the addition of former Crimson Glory vocalist Todd La Torre.  While its not going to supplant Operation: Mindcrime, the sound harkens back to the band's roots.  La Torre was previously a member of a Queensryche cover band so he does a pretty damn fine approximation of Geoff Tate's glory days.  For years fans have been hoping the band would return to their progressive roots and it took this youth injection to get it done.Please note that this is the standard edition.  It comes with a patch and a slipcase.  There will be a deluxe version forthcoming.
    $12.00
  • "For pure Teutonic power metal you need not look any further than to Northern Germany's Stormwarrior. Highly influenced by Eighties speed and power metal, and peers like Helloween and Running Wild, the band is still 'keeping it true' with their own version of classic power metal on their fifth album Thunder and Steele.And galloping it is. Thunder and Steele leaps from the proverbial heavy metal gates at the start and doesn't slow down one bit. (The exception may be Child of Fyre, which has a more moderate pace.) Typical of the band and the genre, the songs are filled with references to heavy metal, battle, and mythology. One song, Servants of Metal, aptly describes Stormwarrior's metal music philosophy.Heavy metal caricatures aside, Stormwarrior does their chosen genre proud. Besides getting the simple galloping nature of power metal, Stormwarrior fills every tune with lots of guitars, big riffage and even bigger solos swarm over every song. Also, to their credit, and likely thanks to producer Piet Sielck (Iron Savior), the mix is quite strong and clear, bringing out the bass line in most every song, an integral element for every speedy power metal song. While there's an expected redundancy when every song is galloping, curiously enough it doesn't get old or tiring, at least not that quickly. With Thunder and Steele, Stormwarrior keeps the fire of 'true' power metal burning bright. Recommended." - Dangerdog.com
    $8.00
  • The debut album that sent shockwaves through the progressive underground. Particularly amazing album when you put it into the context of it's recording date - 1970. While far from the best Magma album - in fact the signature sounds are not even in place - it's one smoking jazz rock fusion album owing much to Miles Davis and Soft Machine. 2 cd set.
    $24.00
  • Gatefold black vinyl edition features one bonus track as well as a CD of the album.Riverside's latest takes a bit of a swerve from their traditional sound.  Parts of the album bears the imprint of Mariusz Duda's solo work - its more laid back, more refined.  Other aspects of the album carry on with the sound that Riverside has developed over recent albums - chunky organ, trippy keyboard soloing and interstellar guitarwork.  This one is a grower.  At first listen it might not hit you but the more you scrape away at it the more you realize its dug deeper under your skin."For the past decade or so, Polish progressive rock/metal quartet Riverside set itself apart from their stylstiic brethren by offering distinguishing tones, mesmerizing atmospheres, and most importantly, remarkable songwriting. Sure, the band also infuses much of its music with the intricacy genre enthusiasts expect, but their melancholic, yet beautiful and earnest melodies and lyrics (credited mostly to singer/songwriter/bassist Mariusz Duda) have always come first. Perhaps nowhere in its discography is this more apparent than on their newest opus, Love, Fear and the Time Machine.Although it features a few complex arrangements, the record is by far Riverside’s most straightforward and accessible collection to date, showcasing a proclivity for upfront compositions like never before. While this may disappoint fans who adore the group’s more tangential, frantic instrumentation, rest assured that the album’s stunning emotionality and breathtaking arrangements more than make up for it. Without a doubt, Love, Fear and the Time Machine features some of the most gorgeous, tragic, and ultimately inspiring pieces Riverside have ever recorded, making it another exceptional entry in an invaluable catalog.According to Duda, the effort is a return to the softer, more ambient nature of Riverside’s debut, 2004’s Out of Myself. In fact, the foursome intentionally composed it “to combine the ‘70s and the ‘80s…[the songs] have never been so concise and to the point before.” Because of this new approach, the disc actually evokes Duda’s other project, Lunatic Soul, in subtle but substantial ways at times. Like almost all of Riverside’s previous works, Love, Fear and the Time Machine is also a conceptual record; specifically, it “talk[s] about transformation. About making an important, perhaps life-changing decision everyone has to make at some point in their lives…on the one hand, we’re excited by the change…[but] on the other, we fear the unknown.” Ultimately, the lesson to be learned from it is that “if we sometimes get lost in life, it is to go through something and be found again on the other side, to be reborn as someone better and more valuable.”Fittingly, then, the sequence starts with “Lost (Why Should I Be Frightened by a Hat?)”, which is arguably its best track. Duda begins by reciting a philosophical recollection over a delicate ether of keyboards and bass and guitar notes. Afterward, he launches into a catchy and charming chorus: “Come follow me / We’ll go down / Where the river flows / One day / Just you and I will find a bridge / To another land”. Duda layers his voices too, making it even more gripping, and in-between his passages, guitarist Piotr Grudziński issues his signature soaring accompaniment as the composition evolves. Drummer Piotr Kozieradzki keeps things steady throughout, while keyboardist Michał Łapaj gets the spotlight during the final seconds. Ultimately, “Lost” exemplifies the magnificent succinctness that makes Love, Fear and the Time Machine distinctive in the Riverside canon.Later on, “#Addicted” truly feels like a progressive rock take on the Cure in several ways, such as its dominant bass lines, starry guitar lines, and wistful singing which finds Duda channeling a silky falsetto he’s never really attempted before. There’s also a brief acoustic guitar arpeggio at the end that’s very enjoyable. Lyrically, it serves as a commentary on how social media can transform people into egocentric users who base their self-worth on their digital populiarty. In this way, both its lyrics and music find Riverside stretching slightly beyond its comfort zone, but the result is undeniably, well, addictive.“Caterpillar and the Barbed Wire” feels more traditional, with Duda’s sorrowful confessions and counterpoints perfectly complemented by sharp guitar riffs, aching solos, enveloping percussion, and a moving layer of synthesized splendor. Honestly, it’s like a heartbreaking and somewhat more colorful missing track from Shine of New Generation Slaves, whereas “Saturate Me” contains the sleek yet eccentric tones and virtuosic yet blunt balance that made up the best moments on Rapid Eye Movement. Of course, its sad ponderings, such as “Am I Invisible? / Or alive? / I don’t want to feel like I’m no one anymore”, are archetypal Riverside sentiments, and the interlocking musical patterns (especially near the end) are equally touching.The most commercial segment on Love, Fear and the Time Machine is surely “Discard Your Fear”; however, despite that typically negative connotation, the song’s approachability doesn’t get in the way of its worth. Rather, it’s uplifting message and relatively simple and familiar construction could earn Riverside an entirely new camp of fans. It’s actually quite cathartic, as is the dreamy and tasteful “Toward the Blue Horizon”, which begins and ends as a luscious ode (with lovely piano chords) while transforming into a progressive metal workout in the middle.Both of the record’s final two pieces—“Time Travellers” and “Found (The Unexpected Flaw of Searching)”—are wonderful. The former is an exquisite acoustic ballad about past possibilities and the unforeseen future. Its winding melodies and spaciousness are the standout features, as the rest of the band lets Duda’s voice lead the way, resulting in a simple but commanding experience. In contrast, the latter is more elaborate, impactful, and conclusive, with a strong sense of closure and acceptance, as the speaker realizes the importance of his or her experiences, uncertainties, and decisions. The music builds with great pacing, adding more beautiful layers as the chorus (“It’s a lovely life / You have gone so far / Don’t give it up / Oh, it’s a lovely life / Gotta go with what you think is right”) repeats with sleek harmonies. By the end, listeners are left in awe, reevaluating their own sense of purpose and optimism.Love, Fear and the Time Machine is likely the most polarizing record Riverside has made, as it could be considered both the band’s strongest and weakest full-length effort. Fans hoping for virtuosic jams and unexpected sounds won’t really find them here, while fans looking for more of Riverside’s token elegant instrumentation, affective melodies, and poetic, rich singing will be satisfied beyond measure. Either way, Love, Fear and the Time Machine definitely finds its creators reaching for new, if marginally different, heights, which is commendable in and of itself. Roughly ten years on, Riverside remains as special as ever, and Love, Fear and the Time Machine is, in several ways, its truest work of art." - Pop Matters
    $22.00