Splendido Hotel ($5 Special)

SKU: CK46117
Label:
Columbia
Category:
Fusion
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Al closed out this 70s with this great effort of Latino laced fusion. Lots of different players on this one so it has more of a "let's see Al trade licks with this other soloist" feel but who can complain when you have Jan Hammer or even Les Paul taking a solo.

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  • Limited edition comes with a bonus live DVD filmed in Melbourne, Australia."Karnivool, from day one, have made sure they are the kind of band who could do anything. From both a fan and industry perspective, the group has made it clear that anything should be expected and they will do whatever they want.While their second album, 'Sound Awake' didn't really spread its musical wings as much as the band claimed it would, their third record 'Asymmetry' certainly has. Those who may have jumped ship at the idea of more dragged out progressive rock will rejoice at the roller coaster ride the band offers on full-length number three.The bass heavy drum chaos that is opening track 'Nachash' is a tweak on the Karnivool sound, as if they were to remake 'Themata' today, with a refined, heavier sound that is simply bigger. This follows with a record stand-out, 'A.M. War', which is a little more math-rock musically, with the vocals opting to be less adventurous.That all changes on 'The Refusal', which is one of the heavier songs on the album, kicking off with gritty screamed vocals and thick guitar riffs. There is still a very atmospheric feel about the entire record much like on the previous release, songs like the seven minute 'Aeons' or the experimental title track, take their time and offer plenty of space within themselves for effected vocals or driving bass lines to shine through.The second half of the record changes things up again. It is mellower, more pop orientated and even at times reminiscent of front man Ian Kenny's other project Birds Of Tokyo. The latter half also lends itself to a little more experimentation, with the drum mess that is 'Amusia' and the creepy guitar number 'Float'.The band manage to channel bands like Tool and Porcupine Tree all in one for the huge closer 'Alpha', another highlight, thanks to its thematic changes, moving from a gentle piano laced opening to heavy riffs and chant style vocals.Karnivool sound like the band they want to be on 'Asymmetry,' a band that will keep you guessing for the entirety of a record and can move in any which way they like, while still making some form of sense." - Kill Your STereo
    $18.00
  • Remastered edition."Nestled between the accomplished Crime of the Century album and 1977's Even in the Quietest Moments, Crisis? What Crisis? may not have given the band any chart success, but it did help them capture a fan base that had no concern for Supertramp's commercial sound. With Rick Davies showing off his talent on the keyboards, and Roger Hodgson's vocals soaring on almost every track, they managed to win back their earlier progressive audience while gaining new fans at the same time. Crisis received extensive air play on FM stations, especially in Britain, and the album made it into the Top 20 there and fell just outside the Top 40 in the U.S. "Ain't Nobody But Me," "Easy Does It," and the beautiful "Sister Moonshine" highlight Supertramp's buoyant and brisk instrumental and vocal alliance, while John Helliwell's saxophone gives the album even greater width. The songwriting is sharp, attentive, and passionate, and the lyrics showcase Supertramp's ease at invoking emotion into their music, which would be taken to even greater heights in albums to come. Even simple tracks like "Lady" and "Just a Normal Day" blend in nicely with the album's warm personality and charmingly subtle mood. Although the tracks aren't overly contagious or hook laden, there's still a work-in-process type of appeal spread through the cuts, which do grow on you over time." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • "There was alot riding on this album. After the general economical failure of their first two albums released in the States, Humble Pie and Rock On, their live albums, Rockin’ the Filmore shot them up to top-billing across the country and into a major name. So, when Smokin’ hit the racks it would provide exposure of the studio side to a band that became famous on their live side. The reception would be significant.Steve Marriott, Humble Pie’s lead singer and guitarist, described the album to me as one that was quite fun to make, and enthusiastically performed. Well, boys and girls, I don’t know quite how much fun it was to make, but I sure as hell can say that the record is pretty damn enthusiastic.Actually there is nothing extremely original about the band. They play a brand of rock ‘n roll that is definitely not unique to them. So…just what is it about Humble Pie, or for that matter Smokin’ that in actuality puts them in a class above so many others? That is the question I had to set out to answer with this review.And to be truthful I wasn’t quire sure about that answer when I started writing this thing ten minutes ago. But now, with “C’mon Everybody” rockin’ in the background, the answer has become apparent.Humble Pie is a confident band. They don’t bashfully kick around a number of styles and techniques. When they set out to record a number, they do it. And do it with gusto.“Hot ‘N’ Nasty” debuts the LP, with the help of Steve Stills on harmonies, in a straight-ahead, no compromise style of rock that just can’t miss.Marriott’s vocal style can be reminiscent at times of early Jagger, yes, but the initial Jagger vocal steadfastness is missing. But this isn’t any sound-alike contest, so as Eddie Haskell says “Who give a heck, Sam.”“You’re So Good to Me” is a pretty song that Marriott is especially fond of, even though he has yet to work it into his stage act. The acoustic nature of the tune, sets it a small distance from the other material, but don’t get the wrong impression. It is by no means a Steve Marriott as James Taylor item. Humble Pie a it’s mellowest is a major bit nastier than the nastiest of Taylor’s tunes.“30 Days in the Hole” makes good use of chorus as somewhat of a restraint on Marriott’s lyrical work. As soon as he begins to stray a bit from the main theme, Jerry Shirley, Greg Ridley and Clem Clempson vocally remind him of the song’s title.All this is leading up to, of course, the showcase of the LP. The ultimate in balls rock. The quintessence of rock ‘n roll. The epitomy of shake yer ass music – “C’mon Everybody,” an Eddie Cochran tune. A killer song if I ever heard one. Great guitar work.Marriott and the band are especially proud of this LP. First, it is doing fantastically well in the States. And second, Smokin’ was the band’s first production on their own. Also, Clempson is a new member, doing just an excellent job on guitar on keyboards.Humble Pie is a band that works with the bare essentials of rock ‘n roll. Performance Rockin’ the Fillmore proved them as a great live band. Smokin’ proves them as a great band. Anywhere." - Cameron Crowe/The Uncool
    $5.00
  • New progressive metal band from Rochester, NY incorporating a variety of influences. The lineup is a bit in flux but seems to focus on guitarist Tony Vinci who displays some remarkable chops. The music shows diversity and not just Dream Theater worship, although it's clear they are one of the bands influences. There is a modern alternative vibe as well. This is a good start - they need to solidify their lineup and gig their butts off. Promising....
    $10.00
  • "Guitarists Guitarist Paul Gilbert returns to the Shrapnel Label with his new CD, Vibrato which is a testament to Gilbert s stunning songwriting and virtuosic soloing abilities.Vibrato boasts four phenomenal new instrumentals, four new vocal tunes and three riveting live tracks"
    $15.00
  • "he power struggle within Van Halen was often painted as David Lee Roth's ego running out of control -- a theory that was easy enough to believe given his outsized charisma -- but in retrospect, it seems evident that Eddie Van Halen wanted respect to go along with his gargantuan fame, and Roth wasn't willing to play. Bizarrely enough, Sammy Hagar -- the former Montrose lead singer who had carved out a successful solo career -- was ready to play, possibly because the Red Rocker was never afraid of being earnest, nor was he afraid of synthesizers, for that matter. There was always the lingering suspicion that, yes, Sammy truly couldn't drive 55, and that's why he wrote the song, and that kind of forthright rocking is evident on the strident anthems of 5150. From the moment the album opens with the crashing "Good Enough," it's clearly the work of the same band -- it's hard to mistake Eddie's guitars, just as it's hard to mistake Alex and Michael Anthony's pulse, or Michael's harmonies -- but the music feels decidedly different. Where Diamond Dave would have strutted through the song with his tongue firmly in cheek, Hagar plays it right down the middle, never winking, never joking. Even when he takes a stab at humor on the closing "Inside" -- joshing around about why the guys chose him as a replacement -- it never feels funny, probably because, unlike Dave, he's not a born comedian. Then again, 5150 wasn't really intended to be funny; it was intended to be a serious album, spiked by a few relentless metallic rockers like "Get Up," but functioning more as a vehicle to showcase Van Halen's -- particularly the guitarist's -- increasing growth and maturity. There are plenty of power ballads, in "Why Can't This Be Love" and "Love Walks In," there's a soaring anthem of inspiration in "Dreams," and even the straight-up rocker "Best of Both Worlds" is tighter and leaner than the gonzo excursions of "Panama" and "Hot for Teacher." And that's where Hagar comes in: Diamond Dave didn't have much patience for plainspoken lyrics or crafting songs, but Sammy does and he brings a previously unheard sense of discipline to the writing on 5150. Not that Hagar is a craftsman like Randy Newman, but he's helped push Van Halen into a dedication on writing full-fledged songs, something that often seemed an afterthought in the original lineup. And so Van Hagar was a bit of an odd mix -- a party band and a party guy, slowly veering into a bourgeois concept of respectability, something that eventually sunk the band -- but on 5150 it worked because they had the songs and the desire to party, so those good intentions and slow tunes don't slow the album down; they give it variety and help make the album a pretty impressive opening act for Van Halen Mach II." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Originally released in 2012 on vinyl (and apparently cassette), the second album from this Scottish based space quartet finally gets a CD release...but its a limited edition of 500 copies so you might want to be snappy.The Cosmic Dead wear their influences on their sleeves.  The music is heavily invested in the sounds of Ash Ra Tempel, Can, and even a touch of early Hawkwind.  Loooooong jams that take you further and further into deep space.  A non-stop assault of burbling synths, echoplexed guitar leads, and a rhythm section that is playing off in another galaxy.  Pure unadulterated psychedelic space rock.  These guys played the Roadburn Festival and I'm sure they must have gone down a storm.  If the numbers 7 - 1 - 4 mean anything to you then I think this should be filed away in your collection.  Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • "With ’March On’ Belgian metallers FireForce delivered a strong debut and – righteously – started making a good name and reputation for themselves within the (European) heavy metal underground. The album was full of old-school 80s heavy metal and simply had everything the genre stands for. I must say that I was really looking forward to the follow-up, ‘Deathringer’, but was also curious whether they could approach the same power and energy of the debut, or even top that. Fortunately my enthusiasm gets rewarded, and my doubts blown off as soon as the record takes off with the strong title track. To be honest, apart from song titles I could easily use the review for the debut on this album as well, there the band hasn’t strayed a bit from the sound and style they showed on ‘March On’. What we have here is again one chunk of pure combative old-school heavy metal. The influences from bands like Accept, U.D.O., Running Wild, Manowar, Judas Priest, Grave Digger, Omen and similar acts are again obviously present, and the record has everything you can and may expect from an album is this genre: sturdy mid-tempo headbang riffs, up-tempo speed metal riffs, thundering double-bass drums, beautiful solos, rough community singing and combative lyrics. So, put your mind to rest and start working the neck muscles. Apart from ‘To The Battle’ and ‘MN29’ – that don’t really work for me due to their (too) versatile character – the album contains only strong tracks, with the mid-tempo smashers ‘Aeons’ and ‘Anubis – Lord Of The Dead’, the speed demons ‘Combat Metal’, ‘Words Of Hatred’ and the title track as highlights. As bonus we also get a cool version of Tygers Of Pan Tang classic ‘Gangland’. Everything put together have made ‘Deathbringer another strong album that fans of the debut can purchase without a second thought. Also fans of traditional, macho 80s heavy metal will do themselves a favour by checking this out." - Lords Of Metal
    $15.00
  • New expanded 2CD edition of one of the great neoprog albums of all time. I should preface that comment. While Twelfth Night are part of the neoprog bedrock that developed in the late 70s/early 80s UK scene, this is an instrumental album. Geoff Mann didn't record with them until the first proper studio album, Fact And Fiction. Live At The Target actually owes quite a bit to Camel and Yes, consisting of 4 long killer tracks. The album appears intact here but is augmented with a second disc featuring material recorded at various locations in the UK between 1979 and 1981. A good chunk of this is previously unreleased. A great album made even better. Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • "Right from the start, a vastly different Weather Report emerges here, one that reflects co-leader Joe Zawinul's developing obsession with the groove. It is the groove that rules this mesmerizing album, leading off with the irresistible 3/4 marathon deceptively tagged as the "Boogie Woogie Waltz" and proceeding through a variety of Latin-grounded hip-shakers. It is a record of discovery for Zawinul, who augments his Rhodes electric piano with a funky wah-wah pedal, unveils the ARP synthesizer as a melodic instrument and sound-effects device, and often coasts along on one chord. The once fiery Wayne Shorter has been tamed, for he now contributes mostly sustained ethereal tunes on soprano sax, his tone sometimes doubled for a pleasing octave effect. The wane of freewheeling ensemble interplay is more than offset by the big increase in rhythmic push; bassist Miroslav Vitous, drummer Eric Gravatt, and percussionist Dom Um Romao are now cogs in one of jazz's great swinging machines." - All Music Guide
    $7.00
  • "After the breakup of Deep Purple in 1976, guitarist Tommy Bolin wasted little time beginning work on his second solo album, Private Eyes. While it was more of a conventional rock album than its predecessor, Teaser (which served primarily as a showcase for his guitar skills and contained several jazz/rock instrumentals), it was not as potent. The performances aren't as inspired as those on Teaser or even those on Bolin's lone album with Deep Purple, Come Taste the Band, although there a few highlights could be found. The nine-minute rocker "Post Toastee" merges a long jam section with lyrics concerning the dangers of drug addiction, while "Shake the Devil" is similar stylistically. But Bolin wasn't simply a hard-rocker; he was extremely talented with other kinds of music: the quiet, acoustic-based compositions "Hello, Again" and "Gypsy Soul," and the heartbroken ballad "Sweet Burgundy." With his solo career starting to take shape (after the album's release, he opened for some of rock's biggest names: Peter Frampton, Jeff Beck, Rush, ZZ Top, etc.), Bolin's life was tragically cut short at the end of the year due to a drug overdose in Miami, FL." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Brilliant third album. While the long epic tracks are of course creative genius sometimes it's the shorter tracks like "Non Mi Rompete" that solidify the work.
    $14.00
  • Mystical psych/prog/folk band from Finland.  Although the label presents Hexvessel as the second coming of 70s British psychedelic folk that hasn't been my impression to date.  There is definitely a 70s recorded-deep-in-the-forest occult feel.  The band pretty much plugs in much of the time and their music can touch on some nice jazz vibes and there is even some heaviness.  Harmonized vocals add a delicate nature to the proceedings.  As you can tell this band is a hard one to describe since they touch on so many bases.  If you are keeping score this release came before 2013's Iron Marsh EP.  Highly recommended."The CD version consists of a LP gatefold replica jacket and a big booklet with all lyrics, photos and liner notes.No Holier Temple is the highly anticipated follow up to 2011’s critically acclaimed debut album, Dawnbearer, that Roadburn Festival dubbed as “a passionate, urgent and gorgeously strange musical spell.No Holier Temple fuses the acoustic 70s folk vibe of its predecessor into a more psychedelic, electric, doom-folk sound with Manzarek-like keys, screeching rhythmic Velvet Underground violins, Miles Davis trumpets and hypnotic freakouts. Weaving the uncanny songs together are the narrative vocals of Mat McNerney, who on this album has matured into the bastard child of Burke Shelley, young Jon Anderson and Paul Simon. Inspired by the progressive, spaced-out haze of bands like Amon Düül II, Van Der Graaf Generator and Ultimate Spinach, whose song “Your Head Is Reeling” they cover with religious abandon. Their sound now expands outward from their eerie, signature, ritual-esque intros into a genre-twisting cauldron of otherworldly rock and the late-night, dreamy spoken-word of artists such as Jim Morrison (An American Prayer) and Ken Nordine.The front cover is by the artist Bastian Kalous and represents the reverence to the native forest and nature that Hexvessel wish to raise awareness and preservation of. The themes of the album “are inspired by the work of great men like Scottish-American naturalist and preservationist John Muir and more recent radical environmental advocates Dave Foreman and Howie Wolke,” discussing the definition of what makes something holy and sacred." 
    $18.00
  • Gentle Knife is a new band from Norway that will definitely bring a wide grin to the face of any prog fan.  This is a huge 10 piece ensemble that features both male and female lead vocals, tons of keys (yup - you get your Mellotron right here), reeds, guitar, bass and drums.  Male vocals seem to predominate but even still I'm reminded quite a bit of White Willow's debut Ignis Fatuus - even more so when the female singer comes on board.  There is a dark and mystical quality to the music.  Not surprising - I did say they are Norwegian.  When the instrumental jams kick in there are jazz overtones blending with Crimsonoid evil.  This just arrived at Casa Laser's Edge so it needs more plays to really sink in.  The first few times through the album I'm liking what I'm hearing...a lot!  Highly recommended."Gentle Knife is a Norwegian progressive rock band counting 10 members. With both male and female vocals, guitars, synths, mellotron, woodwinds and everything else you would or would not expect, the band combines the mood of the ‘70s with a modern take on the genre. The band has a clear visual identity based in the artworks of Brian Talgo. The band has a long time perspective.Gentle Knife’s eponymous debut recounts the tale of an ill-fated wanderer lost in the depths of a haunted forest. An 8-part suite rooted in the classic rock concept album. Recorded/premixedby Øyvind Engebretsen at Sound Lab Studioes, with final mix by Neil Kernon. Mastered by Morten Lund at Lunds Lyd."
    $14.00