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SKU: CK46117
Label:
Columbia
Category:
Fusion
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Al closed out this 70s with this great effort of Latino laced fusion. Lots of different players on this one so it has more of a "let's see Al trade licks with this other soloist" feel but who can complain when you have Jan Hammer or even Les Paul taking a solo.

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  • New expanded 2CD edition of one of the great neoprog albums of all time. I should preface that comment. While Twelfth Night are part of the neoprog bedrock that developed in the late 70s/early 80s UK scene, this is an instrumental album. Geoff Mann didn't record with them until the first proper studio album, Fact And Fiction. Live At The Target actually owes quite a bit to Camel and Yes, consisting of 4 long killer tracks. The album appears intact here but is augmented with a second disc featuring material recorded at various locations in the UK between 1979 and 1981. A good chunk of this is previously unreleased. A great album made even better. Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Xandria have been around for quite some time and for whatever reason they seem to churn through vocalists - perhaps each one better than the previous.  Their new vocalist is Dianne van Giersbergen, formerly with the Dutch band Ex Libris.  She's a great one for sure.  Luckily the overall band sound hasn't changed very much.  This is pure bombastic symphonic metal that follows the Tarja-era Nightwish template very closely.  You may have to play this one in secret or the originality police may come after you but if you do play it loud!This is the deluxe mediabook edition.  It comes with a bonus CD that features an exclusive studio track as well as an instrumental mix of the album so you can karaoke to your hearts content.  
    $16.00
  • "The beauty of Progressive music is the myriad of ways by which it may be approached by listeners and musicians alike. The Danish quartet ANUBIS GATE are soon to release their 6th album, “Horizons”, the first album without long-time members Morten Sørensen and Jesper M. Jensen, and doing well to stay with long-time producer Jacob Hansen. New members Morten Gade and Michael Bodin offer their exceptional instrumental skills in the mix. With “Horizons”, we see a continuation, albeit tangential, from the major turning point that was the self-titled album. With this release, one can expect the darkly melodic-melancholic and song-oriented Progressive music they have since become known for. As much as I loved the self-titled album, “Horizons” tops it in almost every way.“Never Like This” is exemplary of the band's ambitious, but inevitably excellent and evocative songwriting, that fuses liquid but hard-hitting riffs and airy, creative melodic work. Henrik expands his vocals here quite significantly, his immense range travelling from spectrum to spectrum and delivering catchy hooks in a deliciously Jazzy fashion. Coming from Pop roots, he offers something unique and tangible to the Metal table.  “Hear My Call” is my favorite track here; I was instantly hooked, even months ago, hearing just snippets on teasers. A deceptively heavy, yet groovy intro riff, drives the majority of the song, with yet again a creative display of melodic progressions. The chorus is delightful, with Henrik showing a soaring facet to his vocal repertoire. Both guitarists possess a unique ability to seamlessly transcend between the heavy and melodic in an instant, which is sudden and followable at the same time.Of course, “A Dream Within A Dream” requires a mention; their longest track, at 14 minutes it even surpasses “The End of Millennium Road”, but similarly combines an array of amorphous soundscapes. It also continues a neat little trick I have noticed the band perform, where certain lyrical passages would link back to previous tracks; such occurred with “Ammonia Snow” on “The Detached”. The highlight is the delicious passage demonstrated on the recent teaser, displaying a symbiotic melody between Henrik's bass and his vocals. “Erasure” is a surprising and very enjoyable acoustic piece that garnishes the end of the album. As opposed to the ballad “Ammonia Snow”, this track features predominantly acoustic guitars and a dramatic crash of distorted electric that breaks up any potential monotony. Did I mention the hauntingly beautiful lyrics?It is repressively hard not to ramble on about Progressive music with such surreal, engaging properties. In the end, any expectations I had of this release were not met, but blown away. The year is young, but it is already in my proverbial, annual top 10." - Metal Temple
    $12.00
  • First time on CD of this rarity from the Cybotron catalogue.  This one's been in my collection for decades so its nice to finally see it in the digital domain.  If you are not familiar with Cybotron, they were more or less Australia's answer to Tangerine Dream and Ash Ra Tempel.  The band features Steven Maxwell Von Braund and Geoff Green on a variety of instruments.  Back in the day Sunday Night At The Total Theatre was an "official bootleg" that the band gave away at gigs in order to drum up interest.  Pure cosmic bliss out music.  Comes with a bonus track and beautiful packaging.  Highly recommended."Firstly there’ a man in a cape on the cover of this obscure 1976 semi bootleg from the groundbreaking Australian cosmic Kosmische duo Cybotron. Secondly there are a whole bunch of cool looking analogue modular synths. It’s common knowledge in music circles that a cape alone is a guarantee of great music, but if you add modular synths to the mix then you’re approaching almost divine intervention.Make no mistake, there is definitely something quasi spiritual about this live recording. The label calls the pieces ecstatic mood ragas and it’s hard to disagree. These are definitely pieces that are all about worship, yet it’s not organised religion that’s the focus here, rather it’s the synthesizer that is the deity.Consisting of Steve Maxwell Von Braund and Geoff Green, Cybotron were heavily influenced by German electronic sounds from the early 70′, and would go on to release 3 studio recordings with an assortment of collaborators before finally disbanding in the early 80′. For this brief period in the mid to late 70′ Cybotron were the mainstays of the cosmic electronic music movement in Australia and did much to develop electronic music in this country.This is electric drone music, large beautiful synthetic slabs of electronics played out across an entire side of an album, thick semi improvised highly repetitious oscillations approached with a rare kind of patience. Here the journey is more important than the destination. There’ tranquillity to side one, which is taken up by the piece Parameters of Consciousness, where it’s not until a quarter of the way in that a beat slowly makes its presence felt. It all happens in such a gradual manner that it’s really only the change in their synth melodies that alert you to its presence. This is space music, experimental synthetic wig outs, and it’s probably more relevant today than it was then.Side 2 is Vulcan, which goes straight for space with seemingly improvised high pitched squiggles of sound accompanying some lower end noodling. It doesn’ really seem to know where its going, though just as there’ a moment of clarity the drum machine beat is brought in high in the mix and suddenly the squiggles turn into riffs and we’re part of a peculiar wrong almost pop stomp. It’s beautiful, chaotic and despite being one of the more musical elements on this recording, still quite experimental. Whilst this takes up much of the side, there’ also a super rare cut Ride To Infinity that was originally released on a 7inch, which is a much more carefully constructed sequencer heavy Tangerine Dream influenced tune of space electrics.The live recordings were originally recorded by 3ZZZ and were released just after Cybotron’ self-titled debut a year earlier. It’s a pretty incredible set. Even on a recording 37 years later it’s still an overwhelming near mystical experience. It feels so right to re release this material now (on vinyl), as here’ one of the almost forgotten pioneers of synthesizer music in this country and they actually sound better and more relevant than most of the music being made today." - Cyclic Defrost
    $25.00
  • Now here is a killer prog metal release from Australia.  Mechanical Organic is a new band led by former Vauxdivhl keyboardist Eddie Katz and ex-Neue Regel/Fracture vocalist David Bellion.Its the second part of a conceptual work.  If you are familiar with Bellion's voice you know he bears an uncanny resemblance to vintage Geoff Tate.  Katz has had other projects since Vauxdivhl, mostly in the experimental metal realm.  This Global Hive is an incredible marriage of different aspects of prog.  The result is a band that has created a sound that sounds like a mash up of Zero Hour and Queensryche.  Within the context of Mechanical Organic, Bellion has toned down the Tate-isms but the similarities are there.  He's a bit of a vocal chameleon - add in some Erik Rosvold and Chris Salinas and you'll get the overall picture.  Think Towers Of Avarice meets Operation: Mindcrime.  The music is melodic and atmospheric and full on prog metal.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • Classic album from 1981 recut on 180 gram yellow vinyl.  Comes with a bonus 12 inch with remixes of "Strangeitude" and "Sploosh!" by Eat Static and Youth&Simon.
    $24.00
  • "Alice Cooper wasted little time following up the breakthrough success of Love It to Death with another album released the same year, Killer. Again, producer Bob Ezrin was on board and helps the group solidify their heavy rock (yet wide-ranging) style even further. The band's stage show dealt with the macabre, and such disturbing tracks as "Dead Babies" and the title track fit in perfectly. Other songs were even more exceptional, such as the perennial barnstorming concert standard "Under My Wheels," the melodic yet gritty "Be My Lover," and the tribute to their fallen friend Jim Morrison, "Desperado." The long and winding "Halo of Flies" correctly hinted that the band would be tackling more complex song structures on future albums, while "You Drive Me Nervous" and "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah" showed that Alice Cooper hadn't completely abandoned their early garage rock direction. With Killer, they became one of the world's top rock bands and concert attractions; it rewarded them as being among the most notorious and misunderstood entertainers, thoroughly despised by grownups." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Remastered edition of this star-studded first solo album comes with a bonus track.
    $17.00
  • I guess miracles do happen. Incredible to think that its been 18 years since Epilog was released. The long promised third album is finally here and it does not disappoint. The boys and girl are back in town and they sound exactly the way they did on Hybris and Epilog. Essentially Anglagard infuse their music with the best elements of 70s prog from Sweden, Germany, and England and do it at the same high standard as the original bands that influenced them. Viljans Oga consists of 4 epic tracks of Mellotron laded symphonic rock bliss.After the band's triumphant return to the stage at Nearfest Apocalypse, the band generously divided up their remaining stock of the new album among the various vendors. For the moment we have a limited stock that we expect to sell out very quickly. More will be on the way shortly. For the moment - if you are reading this grab it because it won't be here the next time you look.BUY OR DIE!
    $22.00
  • "There was alot riding on this album. After the general economical failure of their first two albums released in the States, Humble Pie and Rock On, their live albums, Rockin’ the Filmore shot them up to top-billing across the country and into a major name. So, when Smokin’ hit the racks it would provide exposure of the studio side to a band that became famous on their live side. The reception would be significant.Steve Marriott, Humble Pie’s lead singer and guitarist, described the album to me as one that was quite fun to make, and enthusiastically performed. Well, boys and girls, I don’t know quite how much fun it was to make, but I sure as hell can say that the record is pretty damn enthusiastic.Actually there is nothing extremely original about the band. They play a brand of rock ‘n roll that is definitely not unique to them. So…just what is it about Humble Pie, or for that matter Smokin’ that in actuality puts them in a class above so many others? That is the question I had to set out to answer with this review.And to be truthful I wasn’t quire sure about that answer when I started writing this thing ten minutes ago. But now, with “C’mon Everybody” rockin’ in the background, the answer has become apparent.Humble Pie is a confident band. They don’t bashfully kick around a number of styles and techniques. When they set out to record a number, they do it. And do it with gusto.“Hot ‘N’ Nasty” debuts the LP, with the help of Steve Stills on harmonies, in a straight-ahead, no compromise style of rock that just can’t miss.Marriott’s vocal style can be reminiscent at times of early Jagger, yes, but the initial Jagger vocal steadfastness is missing. But this isn’t any sound-alike contest, so as Eddie Haskell says “Who give a heck, Sam.”“You’re So Good to Me” is a pretty song that Marriott is especially fond of, even though he has yet to work it into his stage act. The acoustic nature of the tune, sets it a small distance from the other material, but don’t get the wrong impression. It is by no means a Steve Marriott as James Taylor item. Humble Pie a it’s mellowest is a major bit nastier than the nastiest of Taylor’s tunes.“30 Days in the Hole” makes good use of chorus as somewhat of a restraint on Marriott’s lyrical work. As soon as he begins to stray a bit from the main theme, Jerry Shirley, Greg Ridley and Clem Clempson vocally remind him of the song’s title.All this is leading up to, of course, the showcase of the LP. The ultimate in balls rock. The quintessence of rock ‘n roll. The epitomy of shake yer ass music – “C’mon Everybody,” an Eddie Cochran tune. A killer song if I ever heard one. Great guitar work.Marriott and the band are especially proud of this LP. First, it is doing fantastically well in the States. And second, Smokin’ was the band’s first production on their own. Also, Clempson is a new member, doing just an excellent job on guitar on keyboards.Humble Pie is a band that works with the bare essentials of rock ‘n roll. Performance Rockin’ the Fillmore proved them as a great live band. Smokin’ proves them as a great band. Anywhere." - Cameron Crowe/The Uncool
    $5.00
  • Gorgeous remastered edition features two bonus tracks from their early singles.
    $14.00
  • Latest album from this UK band that used to embrace doom metal but ultimately morphed into a Pink Floyd inspired band with metal influences. This time around the band continues to ramp up the atmosphere quotient and seems to downplay the metal aspects. So what we have here is a heavy version of Radiohead or Porcupine Tree. An easy recommendation but if you are looking for metal stay away. Great album now available at a midline price.
    $13.00
  • "Why was David Fricke, Senior Editor at Rolling Stone, seen wearing a huge grin on his face at 2014's SXSW festival in Austin, Texas? Well, he happened to be digging the pummeling, ecstatic vision of Norway's Hedvig Mollestad Trio at the time. Double-tracked with a ghostly haze of background fuzz, Hedvig's lightning-rod guitar blazes a trail that comes in the wake of the heaviest guitar giants -- there's Hendrix, Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi and Led Zep's Jimmy Page swirling around the cauldron, but also the exploratory, disciplined free-play of Pete Cosey, John McLaughlin and Carlos Santana buzzing out of her fingertips. Born in the Norwegian town of Ålesund in the early '80s, Hedvig Mollestad Thomassen has been steeped in the guitar since fooling around with her mother's nylon-string acoustic at the age of 10. Together with drummer Ivar Loe Bjørnstad and bassist Ellen Brekken, and recording with an 8-track tape machine, her Trio turn the full force of heavy rock and electric jazz to demonic purposes. It can be sledgehammer sludge, stoned to a crawl as on "Arigato, Bitch." Or it's nimble as a phantom on "Rastapopoulos," a dizzying churn that's named after the archvillain of Hergé's Tintin cartoons. And for the Mollestad Trio at its intuitive, ESP-connected finest, check "Liquid Bridges." "Laughing John" gestures towards the great Mahavishnu Orchestra guitarist as well as a music teacher, named Jon, who heavily influenced Hedvig's development. The album's fine balance between looseness and control follows a year of world touring, and tracks reflect such odd venues as "La Boule Noire," a former Portuguese disco in Paris whose walls are studded with bullets from a gangland shootout. Enfant Terrible follows the Trio's previous Rune Grammofon releases, the Spellemann (Norwegian Grammy) nominated All of Them Witches (RCD 2141CD/ RLP 3141LP) and Shoot! (RCD 2115CD/ RLP 3115LP) and, like label-mates Bushman's Revenge, Elephant9 and Grand General, represent a thrilling new progressive wave of Norwegian avant-rock/free-metal energy. Don't be fooled by the deceptively innocent portrait of Hedvig herself on the front cover -- a rare example of designer Kim Hiorthøy working with classic black and white photography, and an unusual departure from Rune Grammofon's familiar digipacks. Enfants terribles are a disturbance of the peace. But the regular enfants terribles make changes, they are creative, they force you to think differently. This Enfant Terrible is one of those."
    $18.00
  • "Mattias “IA” Eklundh is a Swedish guitarist, founder of the eclectic Metal band, Freak Kitchen, a band of which I am certainly a fan. The Smorgasbord is his third album under the moniker of Freak Guitar, essentially a solo album, and isn’t one I would quite classify as Metal. It is more of a guitar aficionado’s type of recording with a wide variety of types of music, ranging from nice acoustic pieces, songs that could fit in on a Rippington’s album, to heavier songs with lightning-fast playing and IA’s signature guitar sound and style. For the most part, it is an instrumental album as well. At 40 tracks, I simply cannot do a track by track review but will hit on some of the songs I thought to be highlights. Opener Amphibians Night Out has quite a bit of guitar wizardry over a dance-type beat. The second song on the album is Musth, an alternative-type Metal song with interesting playing and quite a bit going on. Apparently there is comb involved. IA’s take on the AC/DC song Hells Bells is well executed and gives me a new perspective on the song. Friedrichs Wahnbriefe is a cool, sort of chaotic, tune and very well executed. IA’s interpretation on Mambo Italiano of the mambo style is certainly interesting and displays some of his more traditional soloing. Mind Your Step has a nice riff throughout, a bit heavy, sort of something OSI might do. His take on the song That’s Amore is very cool and Metal. Keep it in the Dojo offers complexity in both the guitar lines and the drumming by Ranjit Barot. Mandur and Morgan’s Camel Safari is a song that easily could be mistaken for one on a Freak Kitchen album. Kali Ghat features a 23/16 time signature, making for a weird, different flow than most Westerns are used to hearing. Meralgia Paresthetica‘s drum tracks are played by Morgan Ågren and he is absolutely amazing: precise, powerful, intricate, and delicate are all words I would use to describe his playing here. IA is certainly a master at his craft and an amazing musician, not simply a guitarist. The Smorgasbord is a challenging album and has significant variety, a true smorgasbord of musical styles. It certainly is not a Metal album, but there are things on here that we may appreciate. For “heavier” stuff from IA, I definitely recommend Freak Kitchen, the album Organic to be specific. I hear the sound in a METAL way." - We Love Metal
    $15.00