Stanley Clarke ($5 Blowout Price!)

SKU: EK36973
Label:
Epic
Category:
Fusion
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Second solo album from the legendary RTF bassist, originally released in 1974. Its a burning set featuring Jan Hammer and Tony Williams. Oh yeah...a guy name Bill Connors is playing guitar and going off his nut.

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  • Classic Italian jazz rock.
    $15.00
  • New edition of the excellent debut CD from this Italian "band" who's musical stylings are heavily influenced by Steven Wilson's various projects - the most obvious one being Blackfield. Another band that comes to mind would be Blow Up Hollywood. Nosound is essentially the work of Giancarlo Erra, a multi-instrumentalist. The music has a lush, dreamy feel with underpinnings of synth and Mellotron. You can feel yourself drifiting away, lost in an obscure movie sountrack. A beautiful and intelligent work."The audio CD will feature completely new digitally restored and analogue mastered audio from the original 2005 album, plus three extra re-mastered tracks (clocking in at 78 minutes of music!).

 The DVD features a brand new 10 minute video for Sol29, plus the original three ambient/experimental audio video tracks included on The World Is Outside DVD-R. As an extra for fans who missed the first release, the Kscope edition will also include all the original mixes of Sol29 as they were released on 2005 album version. This will be the final and official Sol29 release, collecting all the Nosound early studio material in one single release."
    $14.00
  • Recorded out in Los Angeles. Not one of their better albums.
    $10.00
  • Latest album will apparently be the last one with vocalist Rick Mythiasin. Well respected US power metal band that melds the crushing power of Nevermore with the dark progressiveness of Fates Warning. German digipak edition.
    $13.00
  • Here's a nice archival discovery courtesy of Esoteric Recordings.  Fields was the post-Rare Bird trio consisting of keyboardist Graham Field, ex-King Crimson drummer Andy McCullough, and bassist Alan Barry.  Their 1971 eponymous release on CBS is a prog rock gem in which Field shows off his abilities as an organ player.Contrasts is a previously unknown to exist second album that sat on a shelf gathering dust since 1972.  It finds Alan Barry replaced by ex-Supertramp Frank Farrell on bass and vocals.  Field concentrates on organ but he does play some synthesizer.  The music has a melodic feel that reminds a little bit of Spring.  Comes with plenty of liner notes by Sid Smith.
    $16.00
  • Jazz Q was a seminal jazz rock/fusion band from the Czech Republic.  The band was formed by keyboardist Martin Kratochvil along with some members of Modry Effekt (although the lineup changed frequently over the years).  In the early days the band were very much a jazz rock band but with strong progressive overtones.  Vocals would be utilized from time to time - some albums have female vocals in English - some have male Czech vocals - but for the most part these are long form compositions that are instrumental or have really long instrumental breaks.  In other words, the vocals that appear are used almost as an instrument and are not the focus of the band.  Towards the middle of the 70s, Kratochvil became influenced by Return to Forever and Mahavishnu Orchestra.  The music became a bit more high energy.  This box set collects all 7 of the band's studio and live albums and comes with a bonus CD featuring unreleased and singles tracks.  Highly recommended!
    $60.00
  • "Oh Italy, will you ever stop delivering kick ass metal? Now don’t get me wrong folks, I love the San Francisco Bay Area I’ve called home for the majority of my life, and am very pleased with the area’s contributions to heavy metal, namely the thrash era of the 1980’s, but at the present moment, no country has been consistently delivering like Italy has, especially when it comes to just buckling down and busting out some no holds barred, guitar crunching, drum smashing, vocal chord tearing heavy metal. And when it comes to metal that is blunt and to the point, Astra pretty much nails it on their album Broken Balance.Astra began their journey in Rome in 2001 as a four piece instrumental band, three of which are still in the band today, Andrea Casali (vocals and bass), Silvio D’Onorio De Meo (lead guitar), and Emanuele Casali (keyboard and rhythm guitar), and after a few changes, settled on drummer Filippo Berlini. According to their bio, they cut their chops on Dream Theater covers, and managed to win the first Italian Dream Theater Tribute Contest, leading them to a show with the Wizard Rudess himself for the Italian fan club’s 10 year party. From that point, they followed the tried and true path of releasing albums and touring. In 2005 they released About Me: Through Life and Beyond, and followed that with the 2007 release of From Within. Now, it’s time for that ever crucial third album, so let’s take a look at Broken Balance….Now, unlike a lot of the music I’ve been reviewing in recent days, there is no genre bending, no quirks or hidden aural agendas. From note one of the opening track, Losing Your Ego, Astra makes it crystal clear that they just want to rock the fuck out. The song, and the whole album for that matter, is a catchy riff fest with a strong hard rock/metal vibe. It’s the type of music that would have taken a very high place in the annals of late eighties metal, with the searing high vocals of Casali, the constant double bass of Berlini, and the relentless guitar riffs and solos. They do mix it up a bit, throwing in a few time changes here and there, some subdued moments, and a growl or two, just to add some flare and color to the overall product. Hole in the Silence picks up right where the opener drops off, without skipping a step. The third track, Sunrise to Sunset, has a slightly balladesque touch to it, with a soaring and catchy chorus that really showcases the vocals of Casali. Buried in the midst of the soaring vocal work is a brilliant instrumental section and a jaw dropping solo. It’s surely my favorite on the album, a song that will be listened to many times, me singing at the top of my severely under qualified lungs.From there they go right back to the metal. Song after song they are relentless, one of those albums that screams “LIVE SHOW PLEASE!!!!!!”.  Too Late has yet another catchy chorus, something of a standard throughout the album actually. The title track, Broken Balance, opens with a sultry tone, something else they are rather adept at, and delivers a fairly complex song afterwards, teasing at exploding out multiple times before restraining themselves, working the listener into a furious sense of expectation as to what’s going to come about. Then comes the instrumental, where they let loose in a fury of notes scattered around before the guitars take control. Six more tracks follow, delivering a good variety on their version of solid metal. Another ballad comes in the form of Mirror of Your Soul. Risk and Dare is a crushing and rather dark number on an album that is overall fairly uplifting. Three more rockers lead into the closing track, You Make Me Better. This one opens on the heavy notes, and then settles into ballad zone. It’s a love song of course, with all the requisite cheesiness lyrically and the solid climactic moments.Astra gives at the core of this album a polished sound for sure. Though there are very few mistakes on it, they also don’t break down any barriers. It is altogether a good, fun rocking album, the kind that is meant for cranking up and punishing your neck and your neighbors. Their tightness as a band is clear on every song, and the catchiness of the album should ensure a good deal of longevity for yet another addition to the growing pantheon of Italian metal." - Lady Obscure
    $15.00
  • LImited edition release of a live in the studio jam session from June 26, 2002. It's most notable for it being the final appearance of band founder, guitarist Frank Camiola.
    $10.00
  • "Having morphed--some would argue devolved--into a predictable ballad machine by the '80s, it's good to be reminded of Chicago's original artistic ethos and vibrant promise. And what better place to start than their spectacular 1969 debut? This digitally remastered edition compiles the double album on a single disc that retains the original LP artwork and features a 16-page booklet with a retrospective essay (based on new band member interviews) by David Wild. Chicago weren't yet the '70s hit-singles factory they would shortly become, and CTA showcases a band whose muscular musicianship and creative restlessness fostered two LPs worth of music that was as aggressive and far-ranging as its singles were friendly and inviting. Tellingly, the hits showcased here--"Does Anybody Know What Time It Is?" "Beginnings," "Questions 67 and 68," and their rhythmically pumped cover of the Spencer Davis Group's "I'm a Man"--were often edited down from the original collection's suite-heavy structure. But those familiar cuts belie the downright progressive and angular nature of much of the rest, which fuses Terry Kath's neo-psychedelic guitar (which careens to noisy, feedback-laden Hendrixesque extremes on "Free Form Guitar") to one of rock's pioneering horn sections with enough experimentalism ("Poem 58") that it frequently overwhelms their undeniable genius with a pop song. Chicago would seldom sound so adventurous after this, one of rock's greatest debut albums." --Jerry McCulley
    $6.00
  • "Get All You Deserve is a high-definition 4 disc audio-visual set from Steven Wilson.Directed by long-time visual collaborator Lasse Hoile, Get All You Deserve was filmed in Mexico City during the recent Grace For Drowning Tour. The set captures the spectacular live experience that Wilson and Hoile created for the tour on Blu-ray, DVD and 2CD.Following the release of Grace For Drowning, Steven embarked on his first ever solo tour, assembling a virtuoso band, featuring Marco Minnemann (drums), Nick Beggs (bass), Theo Travis (flute and sax), Adam Holzman (keys) and Niko Tsonev (guitars), to accompany him. For the shows he worked extensively with Lasse to create a show unlike anything else he had attempted with his other bands, Porcupine Tree, Blackfield, No-Man or Bass Communion.The shows immersed fans in a rich sensory experience: rear speakers provide surround-sound effects, giant screens show off Lasse's films made specifically to accompany these songs, and cutting-edge lighting designs giving texture to each song.Get All You Deserve captures one of the key shows from the tour. Recorded at a sold-out Teatro Metropolitan in Mexico City, the gig features tracks from both Wilson's solo albums along with the new, as yet unreleased, track Luminol. " 
    $31.00
  • Goat are an amazing and mesmerizing psychedelic ensemble from Sweden.  The band's possibly mythical biography has created a mystique about them and their intense live performances is spreading the word like wildfire.  One thing is for certain - this band's blend of Black Sabbath, Can, Gong, and Fela Kuti is unlike any other band on the planet.  Tribal rhythms sync with thunderous distorted basslines underpinning amphetamine driven wah-wah guitar leads and whacked out dual female vocals.  This is truly crazy stuff that is unique and one of the reasons this band is in the process of blowing up onto the world stage.  Highest recommendation.Check out this video of their live performance:
    $18.00
  • Remastered edition of the iconic first album from Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow. At the time frontman Ronnie James Dio was an unknown singer from an upstate New York band called Elf. This released turned the hard rock world upside down. "Man On The Silver Mountain", "Catch The Rainbow", "Still I'm Sad"....it didn't get better than this...ever!
    $5.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."After the failed experiment of Turbo, Judas Priest toned down the synths and returned to the basics, delivering a straight-ahead, much more typical Priest album with Ram It Down. The band's fan base was still devoted enough to consistently push each new album past the platinum sales mark, and perhaps that's part of the reason Ram It Down generally sounds like it's on autopilot. While there are some well-constructed songs, they tend toward the generic, and the songwriting is pretty lackluster overall, with the up-tempo title track easily standing out as the best tune here. And even though Ram It Down backed away from the territory explored on Turbo, much of the album still has a too-polished, mechanical-sounding production, especially the drums. Lyrically, Ram It Down is firmly entrenched in adolescent theatrics that lack the personality or toughness of Priest's best anthems, which -- coupled with the lack of much truly memorable music -- makes the record sound cynical and insincere, the lowest point in the Rob Halford era. Further debits are given for the cover of "Johnny B. Goode."" - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • Fireballet's much maligned second album Two, Too finally receives an authorized release.  Much of the criticism of the 1976 album stems from the awful cover art.  Its definitely something those guys wish they could take back and in a sense they did since they used something different for this CD.  All the prog rock elements of the first album are still in place but the tunes are a little bit shorter and the production is definitely slicker.  Its also clear that Yes became a big influence on the band - check out "It's About Time".  Frankly if you listen to the album objectively it has a lot of merits.  Does it stand up to their first?  No...but it definitely offers something solid for prog fans with open ears.  Definitely worth revisiting.  Comes with one previously unreleased bonus track.
    $14.00