Tardigrades Will Inherit The Earth

Nick Beggs (Steven Wilson, Steve Hackett), Roger King (Steve Hackett) and Marco Minnemann (Joe Satriani, Aristocrats) deliver adventurous rock effort infused with timely perspectives on the state of religion, politics, media, and the environment.

Any rational observer of the current trajectory of the world is bound to ask similar, critical questions. Is humanity about to slam into a brick wall? Do we understand the fragility of our existence? Are we driven to distraction by media and politics at the expense of solving problems of enormous magnitude? Does democracy truly exist anymore? What’s the one thing we can focus on that can shift our direction?

The Mute Gods examine these and other major queries facing our planet on its second album for InsideOut Music. It’s a darker, deeply thought-provoking follow-up to its acclaimed 2016 debut recording Do Nothing Till You Hear From Me. It picks up from where the first album left off, with its examination of societal control mechanisms, and looks at the inevitable outcomes should we continue down dark, dogmatic pathways. Musically, the album is an expansive rock effort with a heavier, more metal-oriented focus than its predecessor, yet steeped in melodicism and addictive hooks.

“I know I’m not the only person who feels the way I do,” says Beggs. “Other people understand the state of the world and what’s at stake as we make one terrifyingly bad decision after an other. This album asks people to take off their rose-tinted spectacles and consider the reality facing us. At this point in my career, I feel strongly that it’s important to use music as a vehicle for truth, not just feel-good entertainment.”
The Mute Gods was founded in 2015 by Beggs, a celebrated bassist, Stick player, songwriter and vocalist who has sold more than three million records with his own groups. His contributions also grace the work of myriad artists and genres, including progressive rock, pop, Celtic, funk, and soul.

Beggs records and tours with Steven Wilson, one of the best-selling alternative rock artists of this generation, as well as Steve Hackett, formerly of Genesis. In addition, Beggs has worked with legends across the pop and rock worlds, including Belinda Carlisle, John Paul Jones, Gary Numan, Kim Wilde, Englebert Humperdink and Seal. In the progressive rock realm, he’s also performed with Steve Howe, Iona, Lifesigns, and Rick Wakeman.

Unlike the debut Mute Gods album, which included many special guests, Beggs chose to keep this release to the core trio ensuring a laser focus and consistency throughout. Roger King, the album’s keyboardist and producer, also works with Beggs on Hackett’s sold-out world tours. King has long been Hackett’s right-hand man, serving in production, arrangement and writing capacities for the guitarist. Marco Minnemann, considered one of the most important, explosive drummers of our time, has worked with Beggs extensively on many Wilson tours and recordings.

Nick Beggs on ...tardigrades will inherit the earth, track by track:

Saltatio Mortis
“The album starts with a Roger King-penned 21st Century funeral march for humanity. It sets the tone for the record.”

Animal Army
“It’s a rallying cry for the biosphere itself, which will inevitably rise up and take back everything humanity has tried to take away from it. It’s about the world progressing towards a state of entropy.”

We Can’t Carry On
“Time’s up. We can’t continue down the path humanity is traversing. Either we start creating meaningful change and reassessing our ways or it’s all going to be over before we know it.”

The Dumbing of the Stupid
“This reflects on how the media seduces and sedates an already atrophied populace into complacency and malleability. We’re a species focused on bright, shiny distractions and this escapism is contributing to our undoing.”

Early Warning
“This track offers three vignettes. The first is of a woman discovering a cancerous lump in her side. The second is a sister discovering her brother is self-mutilating. The third is about a war-torn town that awakens to the fact it’s about to be bombed out of existence. They’re three scenarios involving early warnings of worse to come.”

Tardigrades Will Inherit the Earth
“It refers to a water-dwelling, eight-legged micro-animal capable of living in extreme conditions. They’ve been found living on the outside of the international space station and inside nuclear reactors. If humanity continues down the path of extinction, they may well be the next dominant species.”

Window onto the Sun
“Science and technology are exponentially expanding their footprint on society beyond our ability to control or understand their implications. Will technology liberate or destroy us? This song explores the question.”

Lament
“This is a Chapman Stick instrumental accompanied by orchestra designed to signify the grief and sorrow of those who understand the difficulty of the state we’re in.”

The Singing Fish of Batticaloa
“A true story of a place in Sri Lanka that has experienced the phenomenon of singing fish. It includes BBC recordings of the organisms. I wrote the song from the perspective that perhaps the fish are trying to tell us about our future and warn us of our impending demise.”

Hallelujah (Deluxe Edition only)
“It’s too late for religion. The song looks at how people continue in blind faith, even as we are hitting failure states across the planet.”

The Andromeda Strain
“This instrumental was inspired by Michael Crichton’s science fiction novel of the same name. It’s about how NASA discovers highly-toxic bacteria in space, yet brings it back to Earth, without understanding the consequences of doing so.”

Stranger than Fiction
“This song offers a ray of hope. I wrote it for my wife. If we can find love, it can provide meaning and understanding in all of this madness. It can change the lens through which we see everything, hopefully for the better. It’s really the only hope we have left.”

...tardigrades will inherit the earth is available as a standard-edition CD, deluxe edition with bonus tracks and vinyl.

Track Listing
1 SaltatioMortis
2 AnimalArmy
3 WeCan'tCarryOn
4 TheDumbingOfTheStupid
5 EarlyWarning
6 TardigradesWillInheritTheEarth
7 WindowOntoTheSun
8 Lament
9 TheSinging Fish Of Batticaloa
10 The Andromeda Strain
11 StrangerThanFiction
 

 

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  • Hardbound mediabook edition with one bonus track."I haven't had anything similar on my musical plate for a while, so Gazpacho's eighth album Demon was an interesting, beautifully surprising and absolutely brilliant variation. Again Gazpacho mixes progressive sounds with electronic elements and folk instrumentation with the addition of dynamic riffing and amazing vocals. The outcome is a unique sound that is quite inimitable and rare to find. How much you enjoy the new record will mainly depend on how you respond to this incredible mix and the singing style used by the vocalist. Anyway Gazpacho rules, especially at night.I'm a great fan of these guys and for those of you that still don't know who they are, Gazpacho is a band formed in Oslo, Norway in 1996 by childhood friends, Jon-Arne Vilbo and Thomas Andersen, along with Jan-Henrik Ohme - later joined by Mikael Krømer, Lars Erik Asp and Kristian Torp; they released their debut album Bravo in 2003.Demon, the upcoming record, is a concept album based on the true story of a manuscript found in an apartment in Prague where the writer, a previous resident, had detailed his chase of an evil, “The Demon”. Demon is for sure full of emotion and humanity and the way the Norwegian band reproduces in music the diabolical story and the psychosis of the protagonist is wonderful.The story is told in four parts and it starts with 'I've been walking – part 1' and it couldn't start in a better low-key fashion way. There’s something disarmingly powerful about loud vocals from Jahn Henrik Ohme that add incredible depth to a song. The intermittent piano notes are just perfect and the delicate violin sound is like a nice shade of color you don't notice on painting but that painting wouldn't be the same without it. A great bonus.The second part of 'I've been walking' – that is the third track of the album – starts exactly where the first movement of the piece ends but adding a dark shadow to the overall atmosphere. There are still vocals but now are slower and they mix perfectly with the other instruments. The bass is gorgeous and the way the song turns into a more ambient and atmospherical dimension is great. It's such a damn good track and together, 'I've been walking' parts I and II, might be the best tunes that Gazpacho has ever written.The mix of sounds of the opening track changes completely in 'The Wizard of Altai Mountain' becoming electronic in the first part of the track and turning into a sort of gipsy or Yiddish sound in the second half. We are all crossing lands pursuing the demon.The story ends with 'Death Room' and the motifs of the 'The Wizard of Altai Mountain' come back like creating a circle with that song. Oriental sound, progressive rock and folk are all mixed together and the resulting fusion sound is incredible. I rarely make direct comparison among artists but this time I cannot avoid to think of Radiohead's music mixed with folk elements to create an intricate yet beautifully original tone. Other times they make me think of the Scandinavian prog-rock band Airbag but again Gazpacho find their way to be definitely unique.The story ends here and Demon too, a captivating and intriguing album that is absolutely brilliant. I like the way it flows song by song and the variety of sounds blended in it. Such experimentalism is the proof that the Norwegian guys are really talented and they deserve to be considered one of the best progressive rock bands on the scene today.Demon is an album that requires time and patience to be understood and to gain the listener's estimation and it will reward open minded audience. Play it in the dark to fully experience its great music." - Echoes And Dust
    $13.00
  • OK WE GOT A HOT ONE HERE!  Latest album from keyboard maestro Lalle Larsson is full-on balls to the wall fusion.  He's hooked up again with Richard Hallebeek, who is one of the great Holdsworth clones out there.  The rest of the band is Stefan Rosqvist (rhythm guitar), Jonas Reingold (bass), and Walle Wahlgren (drums).  Larsson lays down lethal synth leads and swaps back and forth with Hallebeek who matches him with dexterous legato runs.    Time will tell but I think this may be Lalle Larsson's best solo album yet!  Highly recommended.
    $16.00