The World Is Burning

The World Is Burning

BY McNerney, Mat & Kimmo Helen

(Customer Reviews)
$15.00
$ 9.00
SKU: SVR294CE
Label:
Svart Records
Category:
Soundtrack
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"A haunting soundtrack to a short movie by Mat McNerney (Hexvessel/Beastmilk) and Kimmo Helén (Hexvessel), inspired by Newfoundland Folk and the Canadian wilderness.

"We researched a lot into Newfoundland and traditional folk music of the past and today, spending a few months looking into and listening to libraries of collected works. I was surprised at how much it reminded me of the Celtic music of my Irish upbringing and ancestry and felt immediate connection to it and an instant ability to relate to the stories. Together with the multi-talented craftsman Kimmo Helén we set about creating a soundscape using only traditional instruments that would have been used in Newfoundland folk. We worked to try to open a portal to dream, nostalgia, a deeper yearning for our roots and the joy that comes from finding your place in the universe. We hoped to be able to help tell Justin's story in as humble and honest way we could and to find a musical voice to his character's inner emotions and journey.""

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  • I've known keyboardist Dan Pluta for a very, very long time.  I never actually got to hear him play but one evening in Pennsylvania, his quartet Carpe Nota opened a gig for Knight Area.  In this age of sampling it was refreshing to see Dan's rig - he had keyboards stacked up to the heavens and damn if he didn't play the beejezus out of them!  I was impressed to say the least.So what's Carpe Nota all about?  The are an instrumental quartet with strong roots in 70s progressive rock.  Guitarist Peter Rubinetti has a vintage sound that fits the music perfectly.  Dan is a very dexterious keyboardist.  He is clearly influenced by all the greats - Wakeman, Simonetti, and Emerson while doing his own bombastic thing.  You get serious back and forth interplay between keys and guitar.  The rhythm section of Ken Sundling and Peter Derenbecher essentially hold down the fort and get out of the way for Pluta and Rubinetti to do their high energy thing.  Knowing Dan's passion for progressive music of all kinds, it's refreshing to hear the gestation of it after all these years.  Its reflected in his music - a trip back to old school prog with the occasional contemporary flash.  If you dig the classic bands you need to check out Carpe Nota.
    $11.00
  • Deluxe mediabook edition.  CD plus a DVD with 5.1 surround mix, 24 bit stereo, and a "making of" video."Always fond of conceptual storytelling, Ian Anderson goes himself one better with his latest prog-folk-metal concept album. The 15 songs of Homo Erraticus inhabit not one but two metafictional layers. The Gerald Bostock character, hero/anti-hero of the seminal Jethro Tull album Thick as a Brick and its recent sequel Thick as a Brick 2, is back again, having now discovered a manuscript left behind in the 1920s by a malaria-ridden old British soldier delightfully named Ernest T. Parritt.Parritt's supposed writings range over northern European history from the Mesolithic era to his own - and on into his future, through the whole 20th century and into our own time and beyond. Winnowed into lyrics written by "Bostock" and set to music by the real protagonist of the story, Ian Anderson, these materials give Anderson - whose creative scope and energy remain robust even as his singing voice has thinned with age - a walk-in-closetful of pegs on which to hang a sequence of songs evoking nothing less than the history of mankind in his part of the world.The first track, "Doggerland," commemorates the area of the southern North Sea that used to be dry land connecting today's British Isles with the rest of Europe. Doggerland vanished under the waves as the last Ice Age ended but, as fisherman discovered not long ago, the sea floor retains much archeological evidence of human occupation. The succeeding songs address migrations, metalworking, invasions (from the Romans to Burger King), the arrival of Christianity, the Industrial Revolution, and so on. To appreciate the songs, you'll want to (at least once) follow along with the notes and lyrics in the accompanying 32-page booklet.The Foreword, in which Anderson discusses the history of Jethro Tull and why he hasn't used the band name for his last few recordings, will especially interest longtime Tull fans. The real question is, will the songs themselves? Some yes, some no. The gruff metal of "Doggerland" gives way to the sweet, plinking folk of "Heavy Metals." (I imagine Anderson chuckling to himself at the irony - no pun intended - of creating such a gentle-sounding song with that title, and on that literal topic.) Both satisfy my Tull craving. "Meliora Sequamur" (Let Us Follow Better Things), which paints a picture of 12th century schoolboys amid religious chant (and cant), does too, and "The Turnpike Inn" is a solid rocker, and the hard-Celtic style of "The Engineer" moves briskly.I like the instrumental track "Tripudium ad Bellum" (Dancing to War). It starts off with an echo of a theme from the original Thick as a Brick (there are others elsewhere on the album), then resolves into a 5/4 march, like a more insistent "Living in the Past." War's aftermath appears in the next track, the sad, deliberate "After These Wars," in which I really feel the lack of Anderson's full-strength vocals. While he was never among rock's greatest singers, that didn't matter - when he sang his songs, you always felt he was all there, and that's what mattered. But now, and not only in the harder songs that shade into old-school heavy metal, his voice just isn't always a match for his music's energy any more.On the other hand, his gift for crafting pleasing, original melodies, writing smart, clever lyrics in complete sentences and true rhyme, and setting much of it in non-traditional time signatures remains strong. The first verse of "After These Wars" reads:After battle, with wounds to lick andbeaus and belles all reuniting.Rationing, austerity: it did us good after the fighting.Now, time to bid some fond farewells andwalk away from empires crumbling.Post-war baby-boom to fuel with post-Victorian half-dressed fumbling.No one in pop music writes like that anymore.Listening to the album as a complete conceptual work, my overall feeling is that there isn't very much new here. Since the 1960s Anderson and Tull have explored countless different musical paths and styles. Some of these produced some of my all-time favorite songs and recordings. Others I hated. But he never seemed to be resting on his laurels. Here I feel like I'm reading a chapter that's not much different from the last chapter.But listening to the songs individually, I like a lot of them. As I write this I'm trying to count the beats of the off-time closer, "Cold Dead Reckoning," with its grim imagery of a future of lost souls navigating their way over a metaphysical Doggerland "amongst the ranks and files of walking dead." I hear crunching minor-key guitar-bass-piano unison figures, a sprightly flute solo. A hopeful verse about "angels watching over" at the end doesn't convince me, as the music continues to growl on as before. Yet there follow a sweet, gentle instrumental coda, reminded us that while things may not turn out well for humanity as we teem over and ruin our only planet, our capacity to create and to appreciate beauty will be with us as long as we live. So let's raise the cup of crimson wonder to Ian Anderson as he charges not-so-gently through his seventh decade." - Seattle Pi
    $17.00
  • "All albums are important and significant in the life of a band, no matter what the circumstances, but it’s fair to say that some can be regarded as genuine milestones, even game-changers, in that they’ll influence the whole future of the band. In view of what The Reasoning have gone through over the last two years, I think it’s fair to say that ‘Adventures In Neverland’ is going to be one of the most important in the band’s career. For a start, the personnel upheavals since the band’s last album, Adverse Camber, have seen the band slimmed down to a five-piece, and with a new guitarist, Keith Hawkins, to replace Owain Roberts. It’s also the band’s first full length release since signing a deal with the Esoteric Antenna label, so even without the personal issues, there is an awful lot riding on this album for the band.So, back-story aside, what about the music? Opener ‘Hyperdrive’ is something of a statement of intent, as if the band are ready for a full-powered launch into the future. They sound like a band with something to prove, but this really couldn’t be any other band than The Reasoning with Rachel Cohen’s soaring, passionate vocals over backing that has so much going on, it’s really hard to take everything in on one listen. ‘Urgent’ and ‘fast and furious’ haven’t often been phrases used to describe the band, but this really sets out to almost forcibly grab the listener’s attention.Some of the songs on the album have been played live for a while now, such as ‘The Omega Point’. Inspired by the novels of Scarlet Thomas, it references the band’s past work a little more than the opener, but even so it still sounds as if there’s a lot of pent-up energy in the band and there’s some fine soloing by Keith Hawkins and Tony Turrell on keys. Other highlights on the first few listens include ‘Stop The Clock’, with its extended intro almost making you assume the song is an instrumental, until Rachel comes in with the vocal, and there are some previously unheard folky influences that make ‘End of Days’ a particular treat. I should also mention ‘No Friend Of Mine’, a song about the perils of Facebook and Social Networking as a whole. It’s another song that has already been road tested live for several months and as soon as I heard it I thought it to be one of the best things the band has ever done, and I see no reason now to change that particular opinion.Inevitably, there are some who will pore over the album and the lyrics in particular for any references to Owain Roberts, and I suspect ‘Threnody’ (Dictionary definition: ‘a poem, speech or song of lamentation, especially for the dead’) will get particular attention in this respect. I don’t intend to discuss that any further here, suffice to say it’s another very fine song, and it has to be said that throughout this album new boy Keith Hawkins sounds a real find, with some excellent work, including some very nice neo-classical links on ‘Stop The Clock’. Having said that, all the playing and indeed singing, on this record is absolutely out of the top draw. There are some albums you can make your mind up about fairly quickly, but each time I listen to Adventures In Neverland I hear something new to enjoy.The recent Classic Rock Presents Prog Awards, where the band were nominated in the New Blood category, not only brought the legends of the genre into the mainstream spotlight, but also highlighted the absolute wealth of new talent that the scene in the UK can boast. By anybody’s standards, this is a very strong release from a band who more than one commentator has said are ready to break through to the next level, and this could well be the album to take them there." - The Midland Rocks
    $17.00
  • "The amazing musicians from Uzbekistan are back with “Sodom and Gomorrah,” a concept CD that features the acclaimed original FROMUZ line-up of Vitaly Popeloff (guitars), Albert Khalmurzaev (keyboards, guitars, vocals, harmonica), Vladimir Badirov (drums), and Andrey Mara-Novik (bass), plus Evgeniy Popelov (keyboards, vocals).“Sodom & Gomorrah” was originally composed by multi-instrumentalist Albert Khalmurzaev as the soundtrack for a theatrical musical production of the same name at the Youth Theatre of Uzbekistan. Reinterpreting the Biblical tale of “Sodom and Gomorrah” as a conceptual foundation, it tells the story of our modern world, ravaged by global addictions and vice that can only be remedied through a change from within the very heart of the human condition.This concept is conveyed through the well-established passion and incendiary musicianship that has become the hallmark of FROMUZ.  This is modern progressive rock at its very finest.FROMUZ originally performed “Sodom and Gomorrah” live over the course of three years, starting in 2004, actively working with the Youth Theater in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, as well as performances at prestigious theater festivals in St. Petersburg, Russia, the International Chekhov Festival (Moscow, Russia), and more.  The band recorded the soundtrack during this time-frame, but it wasn’t until 2012 that the decision was made to return to those tracks, editing, mixing, and mastering them for an official release."
    $12.00
  • Long awaited collaboration between Steve Hackett and Chris Squire bears fruit. Hackett's long time keyboardist Roger King is also a significant participant in the writing and is listed as producer. Don't expect Close To The Edge but thankfully don't expect GTR either. The music bears some similarities to Hackett's recent solo recordings - perhaps with a bit more of a commercial veneer.This is the deluxe limited edition digibook edition. It comes with a bonus DVD (NTSC region free) with the album in a 5.1 surround mix.
    $25.00
  • "The Receiver is a symphonic Dream-Prog duo from Columbus, Ohio, USA, featuring brothers Casey and Jesse Cooper.All Burn, the band's self-produced third album, was mixed by Danny Kalb (Beck, Ben Harper, Karen O) and mastered by Brian Lucey (Sigur Ros, The Shins, The Black Keys, Arctic Monkeys).Taking their musical influences from the likes of Mew, Blonde Redhead, Radiohead, Air and Pink Floyd, the brothers are producing their best material to date, focusing on a dreamier aesthetic than their earlier work.Formed in 2005, the band were picked up after only a few live performances by New York-based Stunning Models On Display Records and released their debut album Decades in 2006 . Their sophomore album Length Of Arms followed in 2009 through Vital Music Records. They have been featured on MTV2's 'Bands on The Rise' and have had songs included on the FX Network's series "Dirt" as well as a number of independent shorts and films."
    $15.00
  • "Culled from concerts in Chile, Brazil and Argentina in 1993 and 1997, ELP Live in South America is an essential collection to the catalog of this progressive rock supergroup. Features versions of their hits from their forty five year career including Lucky Man, From The Beginning, Hoedown, Knife Edge and Pictures at an Exhibition. Four CDS of great listening.""Label Manticore Records say: “Featuring extended workouts of their best-known tunes, this value-priced collection comes in a wallet pack.“The specific concerts are Estadio Chile in Santiago, April 1, 1993; Obras Stadium, Buenos Aires, Argentina on April 5, 1993; and Metropolitan Theater, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 16, 1997.”"
    $35.00
  • Of all the Yes albums that needed a remix this is the one that needed it the most!"Relayer (1974) is the third in a series of remixed and expanded Yes albums.Presented as a double digi-pack format in a slipcase with booklet featuring new sleeve notes by Sid Smith, along with rare photos and archive material, the album has been remixed into stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound from the original studio masters by Steven Wilson and is fully approved by Yes.The DVDA also contains the original album mix in high-resolution, and a complete alternate album running order drawn from demos/studio run-throughsRestored artwork approved by Roger Dean, the release of which coincides with the 40th anniversary of the album’s original late 1974 appearance."
    $20.00
  • So here's my personal confession...after Neal left I felt that Spock's Beard lost their way.  Nick is a fine vocalist but there was something quirky about Neal's writing that had a reverential old school quality that I found lacking.  The albums didn't grab me.  Nick left and Ted Leonard took over on vocals.  Whether it was Enchant or Thought Chamber, he's always stood out and he fits Spock's Beard quite well.  The new drummer Jimmy Keegan slipped into the blend with no dificulty.  The result is (to my mind) a resurgence from this band.  Ryo Okumoto always puts on a show - in particular his heavy reliance on Hammond organ reminds me quite a bit of Steve Walsh.  In fact the sound of the whole album has a Kansas vibe. Coincidentally David Ragsdale guests on one track.  I'm not sure I can remember the last time I said this about a Spock's Beard album - Highly recommended."Very few bands are so recognizable that you know who you are listening to within 2 seconds.  That is all it takes at the beginning of the first track on The Oblivion Particle to know you are listening to Spock’s Beard.  There is no slow buildup or keyboard swells, just straight BAMM!, here we go.  And if the opening notes don’t get you, the organ 5 seconds in will.  The band’s 12th studio album, this one the second with singer Ted Leonard and drummer Jimmy Keegan, is a culmination of years of perfecting a sound and identity, one that not even 2 major lineup changes could fracture. With this new album, Spock’s Beard up their game again and show that this lineup is here to stay.If there was a track that defined what Spock’s Beard are, it might be the opening track, “Tides of Time.”  There are certain checklist items that mark their sound and they are all in this track.  The organ, the harmonies, the acoustic breakdown, the rocking middle and the epic ending.  Each member finds their moments to shine on this one and it provides a jaw-dropping sound overload that could leave one satisfied at that moment; only there is another 60 minutes to go.The album zigs and zags through a few more experimental moments, mixing in some surprises with more traditional Prog elements.  The album’s second track and first single is “Minion”, is a perfect example.  The opening a cappella harmonies provide the sort of memorable chorus and harmonies we’ve come to expect from the group.  While, the following distorted keyboard section is also standard Spock’s Beard.  But the verse and middle of the song is much darker and takes us on a surprising journey.The most unique song the album is the brilliantly titled “Bennett Built a Time Machine”, which the album’s cover is based on.  Drummer Jimmy Keegan takes lead on the vocals here and sounds incredible.  His voice actually fits the track better than Leonard’s probably would have.  The song is one of the album highlights and helps keep the record from sounding redundant.  It is almost a pop song most of the way through until turning on the jets and shifting into Prog mode.There are some heavier moments such as “Hell’s Not Enough” and “Get Out While You Can”. “The Center Line”, however, might be the most similar to something you might have found on their group’s previous album “Brief Nocturnes…”  The track opens with an expansive piano recital piece, before turning into a combo Prog-Western bounce with acoustic guitars carrying the groove. Ted’s voice lifts the choruses flawlessly and creates an almost cinematic soundscape.Even with all of these great moments, it is the album’s closing track that is the best song on the album.  “Disappear” might be one of the best songs the band has recorded since Neal left the group.  “We could disappear, you and me, we could be, anyplace else not here” sings Ted in the chorus as he wonders what might be if we left with no one knowing what happened.  The song is really the closest thing to a ballad on the album, but it doesn’t stay that way for long.  2 minutes in, the song stirs into a frenzy just before a brief cameo by Kansas’ David Ragsdale, appearing with his violin.  Of course, the big epic orchestral ending takes us home as Alan Morse provides the finishing touches with his unique finger picking soloing excellence.Spock’s Beard are Prog rock’s most reliable unit.  They have yet to disappoint and always provide comfort to their faithful fans with music that is both inspiring and breathtaking.  And while The Oblivion Particle shows a harder edged Spock’s Beard, it also displays a group that shows no signs of slowing down and is ready to take on all comers." - The Prog Report 
    $12.00
  • First album from the Yes offshoot put together by Billy Sherwood, Tony Kaye, and Alan White.  This was originally released by the band in 2007 and up until now only available directly from them at extortionist pricing.  This comes with a bonus DVD featuring the album performed live as well as behind the scenes footage.  The music even sounds a bit like Yes...
    $15.00
  • "Following up their excellent debut Retrospective from 2004, Norway's Retroheads are back with the equally impressive Introspective. While the band has had numerous line-up changes since their debut, they still deliver here on their sophomore release quality modern progressive rock with plenty of 70's flavor and hints of jazz. Lovers of vintage keyboard sounds will no doubt once again enjoy the layers of Hammond organ, Mellotron, and Moog synthesizer that permeate this disc. Vocally, things are more varied this time around, as the band now employs new lead singer Mike Mann, as well as Deborah Gurnius on background vocals and flute. Deborah works well here with Ann-Kristin Bendixen, as the two provide a nice backdrop of jazzy female vocals that complement the more rock-meets-stage type vocals from Mann. Rounding out the band is keyboard player Gry Anett Stordahl, guitarist Tommy Berre, band mastermind Tore Bø Bendixen on bass & keyboards, and drummer Trond Gjellum.Most tracks here range in the 5-10 minute range, which leaves plenty of room for symphonic instrumentation and soaring solo flights, especially from Berre and Stordahl. Each track is a prog-rock gem, especially the Yes & Camel flavored "I Turn to You", the mix of blistering guitar rock and haunting Mellotron on "Slaves of Gold", or the dark and complex sounds of "Karma". As mentioned earlier, there's no shortage of vintage sounding keys here, and Stordahl pulls out everything but the kitchen sink on the Genesis meets Spock's Beard bombast of "Living in a Bubble", complete with enormous amounts of Mellotron, Hammond, and blazing Moog passages.Retroheads once again have done a great job of mixing influences like the greats of the 70's with the current crop such as The Flower Kings , Glass Hammer, and Spock's Beard. Introspective is a wonderfully enjoyable CD for prog fans who perhaps aren't looking for the most original music ever to be released, but want something that sounds vintage yet modern at the same time." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $15.00
  • "The album is the third release by the band who formed in 2009 when Belgian Producer and musician Frank van Bogaert and keyboard player William Beckers established FISH ON FRIDAY as a studio-based Progressive Rock project. The band’s debut album was released in 2010 and saw the band augmented by Californian guitarist Marty Townsend and drummer Marcus Weymaere. The album’s melodic Progressive approach soon drew very favourable critical stylistic comparisons with the progressive side of Alan Parsons Project. The reaction to the group was encouraging enough for them to embark on performing several live shows in Belgium, before embarking on their second album, "Airborne”, which gained a wider audience and sales by receiving airplay on mainstream Belgian radio alongside specialist Progressive Rock stations globally. "Airborne” also featured the virtuoso bass player Nick Beggs (Steven Wilson band, Steve Hackett band, Lifesigns) guesting on one track, an experience that led to Nick officially becoming a member of Fish on Friday for the band’s new (and arguably most Progressive) album "Godspeed”.This stunning album features a grasp of melody on songs such as ‘Callin’ Planet Home’, ‘Just a Nightmare’, ‘Ghost Song’, ‘Sanctuary’ and the album’s epic ten minute title track. "Godspeed” also features a special guest, Theo Travis, the virtuoso saxophonist and flautist noted for his work with Steven Wilson, Soft Machine Legacy, Robert Fripp, Gong, Bill Nelson et al. All in all "Godspeed” is a Progressive rock album of fine songs, excellent musicianship and is the eagerly anticipated next step in the story of Fish on Friday."
    $15.00
  • "Taking the same creative freedom that they explored in their debut, Visionary Position, Panic Room have fused their signature sound with an even higher level of energy and raw power. All captured in a two-week 'live' studio recording session, Satellite is a jaw-dropping collection of songs that all shine with the talent, passion, and freedom of a band at the very top of their game. The album is jam-packed full of great hooks, powerful grooves, gorgeous melodies and, of course, the amazing voice of stellar frontwoman, Anne-Marie Helder. While Led Zeppelin, Zero 7, Burt Bacharach, Kate Bush, Alanis Morissette and Metallica are among the touchstones for the creative spark of Panic Room, they are no slavish copyists and Satellite emerges, an evolving, original and beautiful creation ready to take flight to the stars."CD/DVD edition:DISC ONE: CD - "SATELLITE”1.    FREEDOM TO BREATHE2.    PICKING UP KNIVES3.    I AM A CAT4.    THE FALL5.    BLACK NOISE6.    YASUNI7.    SUNSHINE8.    INTO THE FIRE9.    DARK STAR10.    MUSE11.    SATELLITEDISC TWO: DVD - "LITTLE SATELLITE” EPNTSC – REGION 01.    5th AMENDMENT (AUDIO ONLY)2.    THE GREAT DIVIDE (AUDIO ONLY)3.    GO (AUDIO ONLY)4.    SANDSTORMS (AUDIO ONLY)5.    SATELLITE – PROMOTIONAL VIDEO 
    $20.00
  • Sound Of Contact is a new band put together by Simon Collins and session keyboardist Dave Kerzner.  Yeah - Simon is Phil's son.  The apple doesn't fall far from the tree - Simon plays drums and he also sings.  His voice is eerily like his dad.  At times virtually indistinguishable.  The music follows a similar path to Phil's work with Genesis and solo.  Parts of the album are pure prog - in fact the album closes with a killer 19 minute epic called "Mobius Slip".  Other parts of the album exhibit a poppier more commercial side.  I don't think of the album as a pop album - its a prog rock album.  Kerzner provides some very interesting keyboard work - lots of intricacies through out the album.  There is that commercial element that reminds me of Genesis in the 80s.  With his voice sounding so much like his father, Simon will always be cursed with being compared to Phil.  That's a fact.  Overall I think he's come up with an interesting album that fans of more contemporary progressive rock will enjoy.
    $12.00