1614 (Digipak)

SKU: MV 0023
Label:
Metalville
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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Dark, ominous, symphonic, theatrical...and very compelling is the best way to describe this concept work. Put together by guys using the names David Grimoire and Adrian de Crow, Opera Diabolicus is a project embracing the darker side of metal. Featured performers include Snowy Shaw (KING DIAMOND, MERCYFUL FATE, MEMENTO MORI, THERION), Mats Leven ( (KRUX, THERION, YNGWIE MALMSTEEN) Jake E (AMARANTHE),and Niklas Isfeldt (DREAM EVIL) on vocals. Camilla Alisander-Ason provides all the female vocal parts. Andy LaRocque produced and mixed the album and given the direction of the music, he's the perfect man for the job. Big sounding production that craftily blends doom, black, gothic, and orchestral metal together. Think Phantom Of The Opera meets King Diamond meets After Forever. Highly recommended.

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  • Sixth and easily best album from this long running UK based prog band. The core band is Andy Poole and Greg Spawton. The new vocalist is ex-Gifthorse member David Longdon who interestingly enough was one of the finalist as Phil Collins replacement in Genesis (Ray Wilson got the gig). He sounds remarkably like Collins. Lots of interesting hired guns on this disc: Nick D'Virgilio (Spocks Beard), Dave Gregory (XTC), Francis Dunnery (It Bites, Robert Plant), Jem Godfrey (Frost*). The album was mixed by Rob Aubrey who has worked with IQ, Transatlantic and Asia. If you dig Phil Collins era Genesis this album is going to send you into fits of ecstasy. This couldn't be characterized as anything but British progressive rock - they've got the sound nailed down pat. Grandiose neoprog with an obvious nod to Genesis and a real maturity about it. This is the good stuff. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • "With 1985's Metal Heart, German metal institution Accept attempted to add catchier choruses and melodies to their high-octane guitar riffing in a clear ploy to crack the American market. Not that this move in any way upset the balance of their thus-far smooth-running metal machine, which had been gaining momentum with every release since the start of the decade. No, Metal Heart was certainly a step toward accessibility, but a cautious one at that -- and, frankly, there was no toning down when it came to the lacerated larynx of gifted lead screamer Udo Dirkschneider. You gotta hand it to Accept, they sure knew how to make an entrance by now, and the apocalyptic title track is about as dramatic as it gets (the operatic "Bound to Fail" comes close), with guitarist Wolf Hoffman taking the helm on a long, mid-song solo excursion containing equal nods to Beethoven (very nice) and Edward Van Halen (get real). First single "Midnight Mover" is next, and along with the even more melodic "Screaming for a Love-Bite," it places obvious emphasis on hooks and melodies (and proved to be the toughest to stomach for the band's more hardcore fans). But despite another strange detour into jazz territory with the bizarre "Teach Us to Survive," Accept still packed amazing power, heaping on their Teutonic background vocals for the ultraheavy "Dogs on Leads" and gleefully pile-driving their way through relentless moshers like "Up to the Limit" and "Wrong Is Right." The brilliantly over-the-top "Too High to Get It Right" finds Dirkschneider screeching like never before, and to cap things off, the band really cooks on "Living for Tonight" -- arguably the best track all around. A winning set." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • Quite melodic, would actually appeal to fans of Stratovarius, etc.
    $9.00
  • Now here is a killer prog metal release from Australia.  Mechanical Organic is a new band led by former Vauxdivhl keyboardist Eddie Katz and ex-Neue Regel/Fracture vocalist David Bellion.Its the second part of a conceptual work.  If you are familiar with Bellion's voice you know he bears an uncanny resemblance to vintage Geoff Tate.  Katz has had other projects since Vauxdivhl, mostly in the experimental metal realm.  This Global Hive is an incredible marriage of different aspects of prog.  The result is a band that has created a sound that sounds like a mash up of Zero Hour and Queensryche.  Within the context of Mechanical Organic, Bellion has toned down the Tate-isms but the similarities are there.  He's a bit of a vocal chameleon - add in some Erik Rosvold and Chris Salinas and you'll get the overall picture.  Think Towers Of Avarice meets Operation: Mindcrime.  The music is melodic and atmospheric and full on prog metal.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • New German edition of APSOG arrives at a budget price plus a bonus live DVD (PAL Region 0) of APSOG performed live.
    $15.00
  • New live set filmed at the 013 in Tilburg, Netherlands in October 2008. The 130 set includes a complete performance of "Fear Of A Blank Planet". As to be expected the camera work and overall production is impeccable.This is the Blu-Ray edition that also features the DVD in the same package - cool if you don't have a Blu-Ray player at the moment but plan on getting one in the future. The Blu-Ray has 5 live films directed by Lasse Hoile as a bonus.
    $22.00
  • 2007 Nick Davis remix/remaster edition. Some consider this their best album - it could be hard to argue against that notion...
    $12.00
  • Another good Italian symphonic band unfortunately banished to the overpriced Maracash Records label. This is the third album from Conqueror. The music has a delicate, fragile laid back feel juxtaposed with some nice classically influenced heavy handed prog. Simona Rigano's vocals have a nice serence quality enhanced by use of flute and keys. The band finds a nice balance between the two styles. Think of this as a updated version of Celeste. Nicely done - an easy recommendation to fans of Italian prog.
    $20.00
  • Newly remastered from the recently found original master tapes. HDCD as well.
    $15.00
  • I thought Felix Martin's debut was insane but he's taken it to the next level with this one...If you are unfamiliar with Felix Martin that will probalby change soon.  He plays a custom made 14(!!) string guitar.  His musical background has strong roots in jazz but its clear he's able to feel comfortable with different styles.  His approach to this unusual guitar includes tapping as well as legato runs.  If you have seen any videos of him playing live its really something to see.  The Scenic Album is a trio affair - Martin is supported by Nathan Navarro on bass and Chapman Stick, and the mighty Marco Minnemann is behind the drum kit (ex-Behold The Arctopus' Charlie Zeleny is on the last track).  I don't think anyone other than Marco could tackle this material.  Martin's music touches on so many different genres - metal, prog rock, latin and fusion - all within a single composition.  Prepare to have your jaw drop! 
    $12.00
  • "Winter In Eden’s latest offering comes on the heels of their highly acclaimed debut ‘Awakening’ and follow up ‘Echoes Of Betrayal’. Latching onto the production team behind fellow symphonic hard rockers Within Temptation and with critical support from the rock and metal media , ‘Court Of Conscience’ sees them looking to rub shoulders with the big players in the field.Has anyone else noticed a marked increase in the numbers of females becoming part of the rock scene? You only need check out some of the rock publications on the shelves of your local newsagents to find the latest in a new breed or the new release featuring a talented rock goddess on its cover (and let’s face it, more often than not, the ladies tend to look a bit better than the guys.)Nowhere has it been more apparent than in the melodic/symphonic rock/metal scene, where the likes of Within Temptation, Evanescence, Amaranthe and  Nightwish have opened the doors and made female fronted rock almost a genre by itself. In fact, one of the best gigs I’ve attended this year was the Within Temptation/Delain double bill and as someone (probably Disney related) once said, it opened up a whole new world.To the point though. Winter In Eden are another five piece symphonic rock band from the north of England who can be added to the list. With an EP and two albums behind them and a string of recognition  (best new band, female vocalist, live act) from the likes of the Classic Rock Society, Metal Storm and Classic Rock magazine, anticipation is high for their third album, ‘Court Of Conscience’. It comes courtesy of producer Ruud Jolie (of Within Temptation) and mixed by Stefan Helleblad (of…..Within Temptation) and featuring a number of guest appearances most notably including  Landmarq/Threshold singer Damian Wilson. Sounding good so far.Opening track ‘Knife Edge’ has all the classic elements – the false sense of security of the  gentle piano opening giving way to the immediate vocal of Vicky Johnson amid a smack in the teeth blast from the band, a minor respite mid song giving way to a suitably symphonic ending and a flavour of what’s to come.  The typically dynamic expectations and atmospheres come courtesy of the ominous opening of ‘Critical Mass Pt 1- Burdened’ which smoulders along and builds into becoming the big production piece on the album.  With ‘Toxicate’ and ‘Order Of Your Faith’ they display a slightly harder edge while ‘The Script’ offers up something more akin to a string driven power ballad.Although the overall sound is naturally quite heavily orchestrated (expertly done by keyboard ist Steve Johnson) the band are driven along by Steve Hauxwell’s drums and it’s hard not to be impressed by Vicky Johnson’s symphonic metal goddess vocals which pour a velvety smooth coating over  the soundtrack which essentially provide the focus for the band. The album is accessible with some commercial hooks, dare I say radio friendly (maybe rock radio friendly might be more appropriate)  in songs like ‘Before It Began’ and full of sweeping strings and explosive guitars yet able to move into simple acoustic guitar driven pieces.Having come off the road and straight into recording saw the material coming together quickly and making the most of the benefits of playing together  as a live unit. The ‘been there and got the T shirt’ Within Temptation polished production influence has rubbed off  and given Winter In Eden the motivation and momentum to deliver a record which establishes and strengthens their reputation  in the genre." - Louder Than War
    $16.00
  • Since the release of 2013’s In Crescendo, Kingcrow toured North America in support of Pain Of Salvation, and headlined a European tour.  Kingcrow kept busy in 2014, touring Europe with Fates Warning and at the same time crafting the material that would become Eidos.“Eidos” is a new conceptual album about choices, consequences, dealing with regret and disillusion. Their earlier album Phlegethon dealt with childhood and In Crescendo about the end of youth.  Eidos can be considered the third part of a trilogy about the path of life. Musically it sees the band exploring new territories and pushing the extremes of its complex soundscape with a darker atmosphere and a more progressive attitude.Describing the band today is quite a difficult task, but one could state that the influence of such artists as Porcupine Tree, Riverside, Opeth, Anathema, Radiohead , King Crimson and Massive Attack are all present in the music of Kingcrow.With each release Kingcrow has taken a step further away from their original roots as a classic metal band and is now one of the most personal and exciting bands that Italy has to offer.
    $13.00
  • "Quite the misleading band name, ya know? Project Arcadia isn’t much of a “project” as it is a Bulgarian outfit fronted by the ever-awesome Urban Breed, he of Tad Morose, Bloodbound, and currently, Trail of Murder fame. Prior to Breed joining, the band released From the Desert of Desire in 2012 to rather muted results, as in, no one on this side of the pond gave a flying toss. Sure enough, add Breed to the fold, record a new album in the form of A Time of Changes, and viola, Nightmare Records takes care of the rest. Not a bad deal.Hovering around traditional power metal and 80s metal protocol (the accompanying bio cites MSG and the Scorpions, which there is scant correlation), Project Arcadia wisely focus on the considerable vocal talents of Mr. Breed. He’s given ample breathing room to allow for his superbly melodic and hefty pipes to get their kicks, like on the soaring chorus for “I Am Alive,” and the acoustic-led “The Ungrateful Child,” which sees the Swede go full-on tender. But for the most part, the band plays it muscular, hitting some brute riffs in stride on “Formidable Foe” or finding some double-bass happenings on opener “Here to Learn.”The addition of Breed is sure to bolster Project Arcadia’s profile immediately. However, being that Breed is also known for being a bit of metallic nomadic, one had to wonder how long he’ll stick it out with the band. But the songs are certainly here on A Time of Changes, suited perfectly for Breed, who ten years after his shining moment on Tad Morose’s Modus Vivendi, can still hang with the best of ‘em. If the Swede was smart (and he is), he’ll stick with this, and Trail of Murder and keep on being productive…" - Dead Rhetoric
    $12.00
  • "As band histories go, Skyharbor‘s is somewhat unique. Debut album Blinding White Noise was a bit of a (nevertheless beautiful) Frankenstein’s monster – bolted together gradually onto the skeleton of guitarist Keshav Dhar’s home studio demos. With members spread across three continents, live performances have been few and far between, limited to one-off festival appearances and just a couple of short tours – probably fewer than twenty shows in total. With the line-up solidified and a very successful crowdfunding campaign under their belts, Skyharbor have delivered their second album Guiding Lights.Right from the start it is clear that Guiding Lights is a more focused affair than its predecessor. Possibly with the benefit of having a better idea of what they are aiming for together as a band, it sounds much more cohesive and sure of its own identity.Guiding Lights is also slightly more restrained than Blinding White Noise. The guitars are more driven by texture than out-and-out riffing, and there are fewer djentisms. There’s also barely a vocal scream to be heard throughout its duration, which may be a disappointment to those for whom that kind of thing is important.Obviously, a significant chunk of the spotlight will fall on singer Dan Tompkins, especially because of his recent decision to re-join TesseracT – but Dan has used the time he spent apart from the band in which he really made his name to show how capable he is at managing multiple projects simultaneously. Since the summer of 2013 alone, as well as Skyharbor and TesseracT we’ve seen him record and perform with In Colour, White Moth Black Butterfly and Piano, not to mention a host of one-off guest appearances – yet it is clear that Guiding Lights received his undivided attention, and the result is potentially his most captivating performance to date. There is a shift in his approach in the direction of Maynard James Keenan, particularly in his phrasing, which both suits his voice and compliments the music.This is especially apparent on “Halogen“. Falling around halfway through the album, the song is very probably the best Skyharbor have written. A genuine masterpiece, with no fewer than three sections vying for the position of chorus. It is one of those rare tracks that practically demands skipping back for a second listen the moment it has finished. Glorious.Whilst there are some more uptempo passages, particularly in “New Devil“, the majority of the album is mid-paced. It carries a vibe that seems to draw inspiration from the likes of Tool, Karnivool and the dreamier parts of the Deftones‘ discography. Anup Sastry’s inspired drumming also has similar flavours to Stephen Perkins of Jane’s Addiction, which provides a subtle sense of urgency under Keshav and Devesh Dayal’s intertwining guitars.Guiding Lights feels particularly well-named. It shimmers, glistens and sparkles throughout its near 70 minute run-time with an uplifting feel that is frequently close to euphoric. But more than this, Guiding Lights is Skyharbor coming of age. Blinding White Noise showed what enormous potential this collection of musicians had together, and the album is all the stronger for having them all working together on the material from day one.Guiding Lights is an enthrallingly beautiful album that should help warm the hearts of progressive metal fans as the winter nights draw in. It would be easy to see Skyharbor as a kind of side-project supergroup, but that feels like it sells them short. We can only hope that with all the various commitments the members of Skyharbor have on their collective plates, they are able to carve out the time to keep the band as a going concern." - The Monolith
    $15.00