Arc Light

SKU: KSCOPE304
Label:
KScope Records
Category:
Post Progressive
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"A 5-track mini-album ‘little brother’ to the splendid Not The Weapon But The Hand, Arc Light features 4 new tracks and a new version of Intergalactic featuring Aziz Ibrahim (Stone Roses, Ian Brown) on guitar.

Not The Weapon But The Hand was the 2012 debut album from the cult hero collaborative. It featured appearances from Danny Thompson on double bass, Chris Maitland (ex Porcupine Tree) on drums and Dave Gregory (XTC) on guitar, bass and string arrangement

Steve Hogarth is best known as the frontman of Marillion, the progressive rock legends that he joined in 1989, following spells in The Europeans and How We Live. In addition to the 12 albums Marillion have released in this time he has also recorded and toured as a solo artist, under the name ‘h’.

In recent years Richard Barbieri has been a core member of Porcupine Tree playing keyboards on all the band’s albums since 1993 as well as releasing two solo albums, Things Buried and Stranger Inside. Prior to this, it was in the new-wave pioneers Japan that he originally came to prominence, helping to create the ground-breaking synthesiser sound that defined the band and influenced the likes of The Human League, Duran Duran, Gary Numan, Talk Talk and a whole raft of artists to follow."

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  • Second album is a quantum jump in quality due to the presence of a living breathing drummer. Killer symphonic progressive metal. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Legit reissue (on Long Hair Music) of the first album from this essential German band.  The lineup and overall sound was quite different from the two more familiar albums "Time Machine" and "Electric Silence".  Guitarist Harry Kramer didn't have quite the frenetic virtuosity of Eddy Marron but he does the job more than ably.  The band featured a vocalist, Jochen Leuschner, who had a real beautiful and soulful voice.  Inclusion of sax gives the music a jazz rock feel with more of an emphasis on the rock side.  I'm actually reminded a little bit of Chicago Transit Authority.  Quite a beautiful album and highly recommended.
    $27.00
  • his is one of their best releases. It was primarily composed by the band's keyboardist Jukka Gustavson. The jazzy undercurrents evoke a suble Canterbury/Caravan feel but some of vocal stylings of Pembroke and Gustavson remind one of Peter Gabriel on Selling England By The Pound."Considered by many as Wigwam's most ambitious work, Being was originally released in 1974. The album was partially remixed and remastered in 2001, and this latter version is considered superior by the group's mastermind behind the album concept, Jukka Gustavson.When we at Svart began planning the Being reissue, we were faced with the problem of whether to base the vinyl on the original version or the 2001 version, both somewhat different from each other. Eventually we decided to expand the album to a double vinyl, with the 1st LP being as close to the 1974 version as possible, and the 2nd LP presenting the 2001 edition on vinyl for the first time.The original vinyl release featured two booklets, one in English and the other in Finnish. Our version has the contents of both + unreleased photos + a new interview with Jukka Gustavson in one massive booklet."
    $28.00
  • The Japanese jazz scene is finally getting the attention it deserves.  Long written off as just a scene filled with copycats of American and European artists, jazz fans around the world are now discovering that there was some amazing music being created there.  Some of the musicians like Terumasa Hino and Masabumi Kikuchi crossed over into the world jazz scene but for the most part many of the musicians there only gained popularity in Japan.  One of the most important Japanese jazz labels from the 70s was Three Blind Mice.  It was started in 1970 by producer Takeshi "Tee" Fuji.  The label adhered to strict audiophile standards and all of the releases on the label featured exemplary sonics.  The music of Three Blind Mice tended to fall into three facets of jazz (they would crossover from time to time).  Some of the artists play very traditional straight ahead jazz.  Frankly while this stuff appeals to audiophiles its not that appealing beyond the sonics.  There was also an experimental side to the label featuring a lot of free jazz blowing.  The third aspect, which to my ears is the most interesting, is the area where the label explored modal jazz, often with an electric element.  Very little of it would be hard card fusion, but a rock element would sometimes be present.  This falls into the realm that has been broadly tagged as "kosmigroov".The label only existed in the 70s and the rights to the catalog has now passed over to Sony Music.  Think Records in Japan has started a limited ediiton reissue campaign of the Three Blind Mice label.  They arrive in mini-LP sleeves and are manufactured using Sony's proprietary Blu-Spec process.  We are cherry picking titles we think should have your attention.  More will follow in the near future.This is the first of a trilogy of albums coordinated by label founder Tee Fuji.  Its a bit of an all-star jam with members of the TBM roster.  Its a fully electric set that features serious blowing.  Some of it gets pretty freaky but in a good way."Sounds beyond compare – one of those really special 70s sessions from the Japanese Three Blind Mice label – put together in a way that almost seems to be a genre unto itself! The group here have a keen understanding of advances in free jazz and fusion, but work with a deeper spiritual undercurrent and a great sense of sound (shaped by producer Takashi "Tee" Fujii) – so that their individual instrumental elements flow together in rich new ways that are sometimes subtle, sometimes quite righteous! The lineup shifts a bit from track to track – and the set features xcellent work on flute and bass clarinet from Kenji Mori, electric piano from Masaru Imada, tenor from Takao Uematsu, and bass and cello from Nobuyoshi Ino. Titles include "End Of November", "Mort", "Our Foolish", and "Dragon Garden"."
    $29.00
  • Strictly limited edition authorized 2CD live set from Asia's set at the High Voltage Festival in Victoria Park, London on July 24, 2010. No overdubs, taken straight from the soundboard, and modest professional packaging.
    $9.00
  • Here's a new band that will give avant prog fans a screaming orgasm.  Rhun are a French ensemble.  Their music quite effectively captures the essence of Magma, RIO, and Canterbury.  That's just the first song!!  "The musicians offer an interesting and vivid mosaic of predominantly Canterbury, Zeuhl, Jazz, RIO, and (Kraut)Rock. Beside two guitars, bass, drum, percussion and thrown in sounds, two horn players bring lively colors on sax, bassoon, clarinet and flute in this complex mix. The two singers act in a more avant-garde way as for example Magma. People interested in above mentioned styles should have fun." 
    $18.00
  • "Luciferean Light Orchestra is the eponymous troupe of musicians and debut album led by Therion’s mainman Christopher Johnsson that was recently announced and released via the band’s own site, to little fanfare. According to him, this is a compilation of material that he had in reserve and that he sort of amassed through the years, when he came up with ideas which were too “vintage” or somewhat more left-field that your average Therion song would be...It differs quite a bit from Therion in that it barely has any similarities to most of them tunes included here, other than the use of rather tame but pretty hypnotizing and almost hedonistic female vocals, some of which are done by Mina Karadzic, who, if I am not mistaken, is one of the ladies who starred in one of a series of highly artistic and sometimes slightly enigmatic videos that Therion released in the past couple of years and a few simple choirs that sound quite oratorial. Mina is the only other person than Johnsson that is being identified as a contributor. Everything alludes to 70s prog rock, with a somewhat ritualistic approach and dark gloomy riffs, that border on heavy proto-metal, which I suppose is pretty nice.Johnsson, probably must have done most if not all of the composing and is credited for the guitar as well as some keyboards and hammond, which pops up quite regularly and did provide some backing vocals, but was aided by a couple of drummers, a bass player, no less than 5 guitarists, 2 keyboard players and 3 hammond organists as well as 9 singers. Quite a lineup there. The album was mixed by Lennart Östlund (a guy who has worked with Abba and Led Zeppelin) at polar studios this sounds quite old school in its aesthetics, which might come as a bit of a shock to a few people, but all in all, if you don’t approach this album with prejudice, it might be quite an interesting listen. Remember this is not “Therion” after all, but another project, that may feature some current and former members in its ranks, as well as other “known guests” but they have so far, remained anonymous for whatever reasons.Opener “Dr. Faust on Capri” sweetly and seductively unfurls its charms manifested via a quirky little riff, and some pleasant female vocals that will remind you of all those 60s/70s soft rock, psych bands. The whole melody changes somewhat and the song gets a little heavier towards its conclusion which has a rather imposing, simple male choir, that makes it sound a little like vintage “T” too...“Church of Carmel” is very soothing and sweet and seems to somewhat borrow from the aesthetics and sound of “Beauty in Black” but all through a 70s prism and a bizarre haze of sounds and colors.“Taste the Blood of the Altar Wine” is much much darker, led by a simple riff that’s thickened up with some key magik, while the vocals sound completely bewitching...Which sets quite the tone for “A Black Mass in Paris”, which begins quite a bit like “Nightside of Eden” but veers off into a lot softer and prog territory, before it begins to interject some really dark parts which work a bit like a chorus, since you can’t really say it has one, per ce.“Eater of Souls” has this eastern flavored riff and mixes threatening male and rather tame but at the same time unsettling female ones, which do get softer gradually. It’s not bad at all, just a bit weird. Some of these songs feel like they must have been conceived between “Ho Drakon…” and “A’Arab Zaraq...”“Sex With Demons” (what? Sex with Satan, anyone? lol) is completely bonkers and sort of nightmarish, describing lucid dreaming copulation with horny ones, Incubus and Succubus… with the whole thing sounding like the soundtrack to a bizarre 70s porno gone avant garde!“Venus in Flames” begins with this kinda Hendrix-y riff and some licks around it until another on plays a few times and the hypnotic female vocals make you visualize the vision of “Venus” in flames… diabolically pleasurable… I must say and if they ever re-make “Rosemary’s Baby” hey, the whole chanted chorus of this might work just fine.“Moloch” is downright spiteful and malicious both an invocation and a hymn to the ancient Ammonite god. It’s by far the heaviest and darkest song here.“Dante and Diabaulus” also feels like a “feverish” vision set to music, as it is a bit of an interpretation of Dante’s Inferno, but with a quite sinister take…Last but not least is an untitled bonus track, about “Three Demons”… which is also dark, slow, sinister, almost funeral in its approach and has a sudden outburst of cursing screaming female oclasms, as if a hymn to nyx, heacate and the underworld… it’s quite unsettling, disturbing and majestic in its ritualistic simplicity. This song is only included in the physical release which actually is one of the most lavish digibooks I have ever seen, with gold foil embossed markings and superb overall artistic direction.Overall Luciferian Light Orchestra is quite representative of what its name implies, it’s 70s inspired ritualistic psych hard rock and more with a dark atmosphere and occult themes. It might be not to everyone’s liking, but fans of Therion during their “transitional” phase, before the orchestrations somewhat took over the helm or of bands like Black Widow (sans the flute) etc., might like this quite a bit. Artistically it’s quite accomplished and does well what it’s set out to do. So allow yourself to be enchanted by the bewitching sounds of this side project… while we wait for Therion to come back with their “Classical/Opera” project…" - Grande Rock
    $13.00
  • With almost forty minutes of new material, AGUSA delivers a wide array of seamlessly-executed, organic rock on the aptly titled Agusa 2. The band’s tranquil output blends tripped-out psychedelic and progressive rock structures are inspired by more folk than occult influences, instilling visions of nature, the cosmos, and dreamlike passages, meandering into realms of a possibly supernatural or parallel existence. While not a fully instrumental recording, backing vocal mantras only seep in through purposeful cracks in the construction of these immense movements, adding an even more spacious feeling to the overall flow of the album.AGUSA was formed in the springtime of 2013, when Tobias Petterson and Mikael Ödesjö, former members of Kama Loka, recruited Dag Strömqvist and Jonas Berge for their early ‘70s progressive rock project. In the Summer, the outfit ventured out to the countryside where Dag lived, to a place called Agusa — virtually only a loose gathering of homes deep in the forest. Within these secluded surroundings, and the most amazingly sunny, warm Summer day, the new collective had an extensive, extremely inspired jam session which somewhat solidified the direction of their sound, so of course, the name AGUSA was simply perfect for the outfit.In the Autumn of 2014, the band went into the studio to record their first album, Högtid, which was released on vinyl and digital media in early 2014. After a handful of gigs during the Winter, Dag decided to leave AGUSA to travel around India, and following a number of auditions, Tim Wallander, also a member of blues trio Magic Jove, joined the band. In the beginning of 2015, the refreshed lineup went into Studio Möllan once again to record their sophomore full-length, this time having asked a close friend of theirs, Jenny Puertas, to play flute on the recording. The match was so perfect that the band instantly invited her into the band on a full-time basis, expanding their lineup once again. They began performing with this new arrangement weeks later, and have not looked back.CD mastering is courtesy of Bob Katz, done to his usual audiophile standards.
    $13.00
  • 1976's Straosfear clearly defined the band's heavily sequenced sound.  It was highly melodic - all the experimentalism of the early 70s was gone.  Dark and a bit intimidating, its one of their best.
    $10.00
  • "It might seem that King Crimson co-founder/guitarist Robert Fripp's mail order-only King Crimson Collectors Club (KCCC)—an ongoing series of live performances in either CD or download-only formats— might be overkill. But for the committed Crimhead, "enough" and "King Crimson" don't belong in the same sentence. Fearlessly and perennially looking forward with each new incarnation and taking risks each and every night, some shows are undeniably better than others. But every show made available has something distinctive to offer the committed fan. KCCC #39: Live in Milan June 20, 2003 captures the last commercially recorded incarnation early into its final European tour before Warr touch guitarist Trey Gunn's departure and, while it may have a few more warts than other KCCC recordings, they only serve to make Crimson more human.Amongst the more noticeable warts: a barely perceptible ungluing of the interlocking guitars near the end of the Neuvo Metal anthem, "Level Five"; a false start into "The ConstruKction of Light" before a gritty "ProzaKc Blues," despite featuring one of guitarist Adrian Belew's best vocals; and momentary sonic glitches during what are meant to be silent sections during the power-pop "Dinosaur" and pulsing complexity of "Larks' Tongues in Aspic: Part Four," the latter just before Belew delivers one of the most blistering solos of any documented version.The show is similar in structure to many other shows around that time, weighing heavily on material from the recently released The Power to Believe (DGM Live, 2003). Still, a special energy imbues some of the material, and a particularly gossamer-like feel to the intersecting guitars of "The ConstruKction of Light." "Elephant Talk"—a favorite dating back to the '80s Crim with Fripp, Belew, bassist Tony Levin and drummer Bill Bruford—plods along more, well, elephant-like, courtesy of the overdriven bottom end of Gunn's touch guitar and sports a simply stunning, never-before-documented Middle Eastern-inflected solo from Belew that also layers either his radically processed voice or an effect applied to his guitar that's unique, even in his seemingly infinite sonic palette.There have been briefer "Introductory Soundscapes" on other Crimson live recordings of the period, but this is the first time a full-length opening set by Fripp, nearly 26 minutes long, is included. Ethereal and tranquil, it's the calm before the storm as it segues into the equally rarified miniature, "The Power to Believe I," before Crimson—with drummer Pat Mastelotto's acoustic/electric kit thundering across the stereo landscape—hits the crowd with the one-two punch of "Level Five" and "ProzaKc Blues."Other highlights are an especially poignant "The Deception of the Thrush," a screaming, frantically strummed Fripp solo over the head-banging riff of "Facts of Life" and the texturally rich, part Gamelan "The Power to Believe II."Live in Milan may not be essential Crimson, but there are plenty of rewards to differentiate it from others in the series, and the warts-and-all approach just cements Crimson as a group that takes risks and isn't afraid to show its tremendous strengths...and very occasional weaknesses." - All About Jazz
    $17.00
  • Ninth album from this Swedish band.  Katatonia's music shares a kindred spirit with that of Opeth and Tool.  Very much emotion driven with a dark vibe through out.  It doesn't come more melancholy than this one... "Despite being into their third decade, gloomy Swedish progressive metallers Katatonia are still producing fine work. 2009’s Night Is the New Day was heralded as the band’s finest ever album, and with prog’s increasing influence evident across the more facile end of the metal spectrum, this band is doing better than ever. Dead End Kings marks another progression for this outfit – in terms of album structure, anyway. While their previous effort was a sumptuous effort with a sum greater than its parts, this ninth album is a collection of fantastic, searching songs that stand alone as well as they do together. It’s still completely and utterly miserable, though… so very, very miserable. The cellos in opening track The Parting add solemn layers to music that is already laden with sorrow and introspection. It’s a multifarious affair from then on in. The slightly sinister Hypnone adds strength before the album succumbs to the mellow, emotive The Racing Heart. Buildings is the most resolutely metal track here. Its humungous riffs are positioned at exactly the moment where the listener may have been lulled into a false sense of security, bludgeoning guitars swelling the song’s belly with a fiercely charged beauty. There are other moments of grandiose, majestic beauty breaking up the murkiness, but Buildings is the only piece of metal you’re going to get.Dead Letters is massively reminiscent of Tool – and while the American prog-grungers remain at work on their overdue fifth LP, it’s a very welcome sound. It doesn’t last though. As with everything Katatonia do, the song wanders off into another direction, atmospheric moments splintering into sparse orchestration, Jonas Renkse’s murmured voice flying across the top throughout. <br><br>The closer is certainly the finest standalone song here, bringing Dead End Kings to a glorious and complex end. There’s no grand climax. It just fades to dust, allowing you to reflect upon yet another excellent album from Katatonia." - BBC
    $15.00
  • Beautiful second CD from this Greek band formerly known as Will-o The Wisp.  The band continues their with their retro hard rock sound.  Heavy organ and guitar runs with a sombre, doomy vibe lends some comparisons to Black Sabbath and Deep Purple.  The band still makes a prog move here and there for good measure.  Highly recommended.Manticore's Breath continue to torture retailers worldwide with their packaging.  The CD packaging is a rather fragile affair and quite gorgeous.  Its an embossed textured cover with beautiful artwork by Harry Clarke that will remind you a bit of Arthur Rackham.  Oh yeah - a limited number edition of 400 tops it all off. 
    $23.00
  • Well Steve is done resucitating the Genesis catalogue and back to concentrating on fresh solo material.  The new album Wolflight is a bit of a loose concept album and I find it to be one of his strongest releases in years.  The album is filled with lots of guests (including Chris Squire) contributing exotic instruments to the mix adding an old world sound.  Steve's trademark sound is locked into place so if you are looking for the wailing guitar, liquid runs and acoustic delicacy you won't be disappointed.  His vocals has never been my favorite part of a Steve Hackett album but either I've mellowed in age or his voice has - not sure which.  Regardless it fits the music just fine.  Classic Hackett and nothing less.  BUY OR DIE!
    $12.00
  • AlieNatura is the second album from this superb band playing in the classic "rock progressivo italiano" style.  The band is led by keyboardist Elisa Montaldo, who is as impressive on the ears as she is on the eyes (pardon the sexist comment).  One of the strong points of the band's debut was the inclusion in the lineup of former Museo Rosenbach vocalist Lupi Galifi.  With MR reforming he's left Il Tempio Delle Clessidre.  The obvious concern is who could fill his shoes?  Apparently the unknown Francesco Ciapica.  Truth is he does a fine job.  The guy can sing.  He has that expressive style that fits this music so perfectly.  Beautiful symphonic keyboards, liquid guitar runs, phat Moog solos - this band has the sound down pat.  The Italian scene seems to be burgeoning with new RPI bands and I would classify Il Tempio Delle Clessidre right up there with La Maschera Di Cera.  That's saying something.  BUY OR DIE!
    $16.00