Ashes And Madness

SKU: NMR-452
Label:
Nightmare
Category:
Metal/Hard Rock
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"AVIAN “Ashes and Madness” is the amazing sophomore effort of vocalist/ producer Lance King best known for his many albums with (Balance of Power / Pyramaze /Gemini ) and guitarist /composer Yan Leviathan. The bands Debut album Featured known Megadeth bassist David Ellefson. This new offering the band has added BILL HUDSON of Cellador guitar fame.



Lance King’s vocals are extremely memorable and intoxicating, these songs well written, memorable and while being very heavy are still very accessible and radio friendly. These songs are sure to grab the listener on their first listen."

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:59
Rate: 
0
A strictly OK power/prog metal album that, unfortunately, offers no new ideas. In all honesty, I think Lance King is getting a bit burned out jumping from band to band. While this one was decent at first blush, I would have a hard time saying that I can't wait to spin it again. Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:59
Rate: 
0
One of my favorites so far this year. not a bad song on the disc. It must be played loud to really enjoy it. My favorites are "Into: The other Side" and "All the Kings Horses". The musianship and vocals are top notch. I liked their first disc but this one really surprised me how good it is.
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:59
Rate: 
0
A strictly OK power/prog metal album that, unfortunately, offers no new ideas. In all honesty, I think Lance King is getting a bit burned out jumping from band to band. While this one was decent at first blush, I would have a hard time saying that I can't wait to spin it again. Leyth
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:59
Rate: 
0
One of my favorites so far this year. not a bad song on the disc. It must be played loud to really enjoy it. My favorites are "Into: The other Side" and "All the Kings Horses". The musianship and vocals are top notch. I liked their first disc but this one really surprised me how good it is.
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