Boi

Boi

BY 3rd Ear Experience

(Customer Reviews)
$16.00
$ 9.60
SKU: 020286213925
Label:
Private Release
Category:
Psychedelic
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Second album from this US psychedelic band features Dug Pinnick on bass and vocals.  If you like space rock/psych jams along the lines of Ozric Tentacles, Quantum Fantay, and Gong you need to these guys.  Wicked stuff.

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  • Second album from this Swiss band draws very heavily from the Katatonia musical gene pool.  Melancholy metal that actually has a groove.  Some of the proggier bits remind of Tool.   
    $13.00
  • Third album from a band that is essentially a mash up of members from Sieges Even, Sun Caged and Dreamscape.  Their music carries on very much in the style of the later Sieges Even albums.  In other words progressive rock that leans towards the heavier side of the spectrum.  Rush, Rabin-era Yes, Saga, and Dream Theater come to mind as influences.  Quite melodic and if you are so inclined you'll hear some incredible chops from guitarist Markus Steffen.  The band corraled Stream Of Passion's Marcela Bovio for a guest vocal appearance, dueting with Arno Menses.This is the deluxe 2CD edition.  It sports a really cool looking 3D cover.  The bonus CD is a live concert recorded in Mannheim in 2012.
    $19.00
  • Special edition of the 18th studio album from these British melodic hard rock stalwarts.  Comes with a bonus disc with unreleased acoustic and live tracks from the band's vault. "There are some bands who just seem incapable of making bad albums, the odd inconsistent one maybe, the odd ill advised departure, but never bad. Well step up with pride those Brummie boys Magnum, who over the last 34 years (admittedly with a 5 or 6 year break) have regaled us with some of the best British pomp you could ever care to hear. Which judging by studio album number 17, is something that isn't liable to stop anytime soon!To be fair, On The Thirteenth Day isn't the sort of album that is going to change any minds, I doubt very much that was intention. Instead it builds and ever so slightly expands upon the impressive catalogue Magnum have amassed over the decades and stands tall and proud alongside their most revered releases. Only nostalgia will stop long term fans of the band proclaiming that this release is as good as On A Storyteller's Night, or Wings Of Heaven (or whichever is their fave reminisce), but it is. Yes the formula runs pretty close to the last three Magnum offerings, Princess Alice And The Broken Arrow, Into The Valley Of The Moonking and The Visitation, but considering how pleasing on the ear they all were, the fact that On The Thirteenth Day betters them is recommendation enough.Ease into the uplifting "Shadow Town", the ever building and instantly memorable "So Let It Rain" (the stick in your head song of the album), the wonderfully titled and welcomingly familiar "Blood Red Laughter", or stomping, melancholy intent of "From Within" for confirmation that this is a vintage motor still running at full tilt. Pleasingly there are a couple of curve-balls, with "Dance Of The Black Tattoo" having a chunkier riff than this band are known for, while "Broken Promises" follows a similar path, but with a bluesier edge.The voice of the band, Bob Catley, maybe sounds a little lived in these days, but few frontmen can offer up the warmth and emotion of his delivery, while long standing (someone get him a seat please!) keyboard player Mark Stanway adds the layers of atmosphere that mark out the Magnum signature sound. The new (a decade of service still denotes newbies in this band!) lads also stack up well, with Harry James on drums and bassist Al Barrow proving once again that having the most solid of rhythm sections is priceless in any band of any genre. However without guitar player and songwriter Tony Clarkin, this band simply wouldn't be, so let's all doff our caps to "The Hat" and pay reverence to yet another cracking set of songs and another stunning six string performance.On The Thirteenth Day is a fantastic blend of all of the elements with which Magnum have impressed, seduced and won our affection for almost as long as we can remember now and is an impressive statement from a band that would have every right to be sitting with their feet up and living off past glories at this stage of their careers. The fact that they are not is a reason to rejoice and so is On The Thirteenth Day!" - Sea Of Tranquility
    $16.00
  • Deluxe mediabook edition.  CD plus a DVD with 5.1 surround mix, 24 bit stereo, and a "making of" video."Always fond of conceptual storytelling, Ian Anderson goes himself one better with his latest prog-folk-metal concept album. The 15 songs of Homo Erraticus inhabit not one but two metafictional layers. The Gerald Bostock character, hero/anti-hero of the seminal Jethro Tull album Thick as a Brick and its recent sequel Thick as a Brick 2, is back again, having now discovered a manuscript left behind in the 1920s by a malaria-ridden old British soldier delightfully named Ernest T. Parritt.Parritt's supposed writings range over northern European history from the Mesolithic era to his own - and on into his future, through the whole 20th century and into our own time and beyond. Winnowed into lyrics written by "Bostock" and set to music by the real protagonist of the story, Ian Anderson, these materials give Anderson - whose creative scope and energy remain robust even as his singing voice has thinned with age - a walk-in-closetful of pegs on which to hang a sequence of songs evoking nothing less than the history of mankind in his part of the world.The first track, "Doggerland," commemorates the area of the southern North Sea that used to be dry land connecting today's British Isles with the rest of Europe. Doggerland vanished under the waves as the last Ice Age ended but, as fisherman discovered not long ago, the sea floor retains much archeological evidence of human occupation. The succeeding songs address migrations, metalworking, invasions (from the Romans to Burger King), the arrival of Christianity, the Industrial Revolution, and so on. To appreciate the songs, you'll want to (at least once) follow along with the notes and lyrics in the accompanying 32-page booklet.The Foreword, in which Anderson discusses the history of Jethro Tull and why he hasn't used the band name for his last few recordings, will especially interest longtime Tull fans. The real question is, will the songs themselves? Some yes, some no. The gruff metal of "Doggerland" gives way to the sweet, plinking folk of "Heavy Metals." (I imagine Anderson chuckling to himself at the irony - no pun intended - of creating such a gentle-sounding song with that title, and on that literal topic.) Both satisfy my Tull craving. "Meliora Sequamur" (Let Us Follow Better Things), which paints a picture of 12th century schoolboys amid religious chant (and cant), does too, and "The Turnpike Inn" is a solid rocker, and the hard-Celtic style of "The Engineer" moves briskly.I like the instrumental track "Tripudium ad Bellum" (Dancing to War). It starts off with an echo of a theme from the original Thick as a Brick (there are others elsewhere on the album), then resolves into a 5/4 march, like a more insistent "Living in the Past." War's aftermath appears in the next track, the sad, deliberate "After These Wars," in which I really feel the lack of Anderson's full-strength vocals. While he was never among rock's greatest singers, that didn't matter - when he sang his songs, you always felt he was all there, and that's what mattered. But now, and not only in the harder songs that shade into old-school heavy metal, his voice just isn't always a match for his music's energy any more.On the other hand, his gift for crafting pleasing, original melodies, writing smart, clever lyrics in complete sentences and true rhyme, and setting much of it in non-traditional time signatures remains strong. The first verse of "After These Wars" reads:After battle, with wounds to lick andbeaus and belles all reuniting.Rationing, austerity: it did us good after the fighting.Now, time to bid some fond farewells andwalk away from empires crumbling.Post-war baby-boom to fuel with post-Victorian half-dressed fumbling.No one in pop music writes like that anymore.Listening to the album as a complete conceptual work, my overall feeling is that there isn't very much new here. Since the 1960s Anderson and Tull have explored countless different musical paths and styles. Some of these produced some of my all-time favorite songs and recordings. Others I hated. But he never seemed to be resting on his laurels. Here I feel like I'm reading a chapter that's not much different from the last chapter.But listening to the songs individually, I like a lot of them. As I write this I'm trying to count the beats of the off-time closer, "Cold Dead Reckoning," with its grim imagery of a future of lost souls navigating their way over a metaphysical Doggerland "amongst the ranks and files of walking dead." I hear crunching minor-key guitar-bass-piano unison figures, a sprightly flute solo. A hopeful verse about "angels watching over" at the end doesn't convince me, as the music continues to growl on as before. Yet there follow a sweet, gentle instrumental coda, reminded us that while things may not turn out well for humanity as we teem over and ruin our only planet, our capacity to create and to appreciate beauty will be with us as long as we live. So let's raise the cup of crimson wonder to Ian Anderson as he charges not-so-gently through his seventh decade." - Seattle Pi
    $17.00
  • "2012 two CD live release. The Tea Party is a Canadian rock band with blues, progressive rock, Indian and Middle Eastern influences, dubbed "Moroccan roll" by the media. Active throughout the 1990s up until 2005 when the band broke up, The Tea Party released eight albums on EMI Music Canada, selling 2 million records worldwide, and achieving a #1 Canadian single "Heaven Coming Down" in 1999. The Tea Party toured Canada on twenty-one occasions and Australia on twelve. In November 2002, The Tea Party toured Canada with symphony orchestras reinterpreting a decade's worth of shared songwriting. The band broke up in 2005 due to creative differences, but re-united in 2011 to play several Canadian tour dates during the summer. During the tour it was decided to continue and the band has now reformed. Live From Australia: The Reformation Tour was recorded in 2012 during The Tea Party's Australian tour and showcases the band bursting with renewed energy."
    $16.00
  • Kindly Bent To Free Us is the long awaited third album from Cynic.  It finds the core trio of Paul Masvidal, Sean Reinert, and Sean Malone intact.  Just as Traced In Air was an evolution from Focus, so is Kindly Bent To Free Us a natural sounding progression from Traced In Air.  There is a common underlying sound which is clearly Cynic.  The music still maintains metallic and jazz roots but it serves as a foundation for a sound that owes more to prog rock.  If you are expecting Focus you will be disappointed.  This probably owes more to Porcupine Tree and Riverside as its not quite as technical as in the past, relying more on atmosphere.  But don't get me wrong, there is some unbelievable playing going on.  Once again Sean Malone demonstrates that he is the most underrated bassist in the world.  Highly recommended.
    $11.00
  • "Shub Niggurath were a brilliant, very dark, French Zeuhl band. The original line-up (the only line-up that matters, imo) featured Alain Baullaud-bass, Franck Coulaud-drums, Franck Fromy-guitar, percussion, Jean-Luck Hervé-piano, harmonium, Ann Stewart-vocals and Veeronique Verdier-trombone. The seemingly burst out of nowhere with their stunning debut album on Musea (Musea's first release, iirc) "Les Morts Vont Vite" and then dissapeared back into whatever dark hell had inspired them in the first place. BUT: what many didn't know is that in 1982, in preparation for a tour, they had recorded a 41' session that was issued only as a cassette tape. A copy of the tape had come to us in the mail with no contact information and I had thought it was pretty great, and then I never heard of them again until their album was released 3-4 years later! Now over 25 years later, these 1982 recordings, which feature 5 songs - only one of which was later re-recorded for Les Morts Vont Vite - have been newly transfered and mastered by Udi Koomran for the enjoyment of Zeuhl fans/dark avant-progressive. Recommended." - Steve Feigenbaum
    $16.00
  • "Almost two years after the suprising German chart success of "Hold On, Liberty!", The Intersphere return with a brand new studio album.  And instead of relying on formulas or formats, the band have relied completely on their hands an hearts.  That being said, The Intersphere are pushing the boundaries of rock music towards new horizons with a pace and precision seldom found in German bands in the last few years. Under the production acumen of Singer/Guitarist Christoph Hessler and co-producer/mixer Moritz Enders (whose credits include German indie powerhouses Casper, Kraftklub and Madsen), this fourth release in The Intersphere discography was recorded together with Wolfgang Manns at Toolhouse Studios."'Relations In The Unseen' is not a concept album, but there is definitely a purveying train of thought overall. We all communicate, not only directly, but also indirectly through gestures, body language, thoughts and connections that are unconcious at first," says Christoph Hessler.  Lyrically, the album concentrates on these unconcious things that influence our feelings, thoughts and reactions.  Every day we're offered countless examples of this - invisible, unknown - over distances, times and dimensions. With "Relations In The Unseen" The Intersphere have succeeded at a return to self - and to the really important things in music."
    $9.00
  • "Rafał Paluszek, band’s keyboardist comments: “Our new album, just like it was with Particles (2013), is not a concept album. We abandoned that as a creative method. And when we came up with the title ‘The After-Effect’, it was partly as a joke. An after-effect is a consequence, the result of all that's going on in our lives. Every album sums up a certain episode in your life. It crowns a certain creative process, which is, after all, brought about by something, and which is a lasting phenomenon. We experience certain things, every event has some influence on what we do. Why shouldn't that apply to the music we create? In a relatively short period of time, 2/5 of Osada Vida's lineup has changed. Such changes are like a tsunami - there are losses, but there's also a reason to build something new, something we wouldn't dare to build back in the untroubled days. We don't know what effects today's events will have. Looking at it from a mathematical perspective, there's an infinite number of paths, each branching out into an infinite number of paths as well, and so on. That's what The After-Effect (2014) is.”"
    $15.00
  • One of the all time great psych monsters back in print.  The Dream was a one and one band from Norway.  They recorded this one album in 1967.  One of the primary reasons this album is so desireable is that the lead guitarist is none other than Terje Rypdal!  Its a period sounding piece - you can tell this is the late 60s but damn if it isn't as well done as anything else from this time.  Rypdal displays an obvious influence from Hendrix.  He completely blows it out on this album.  Plenty of Hammond organ grinding away in the background.  Lyrics are pretty stupid - the opening track is actually called 'Green Things (From Outer Space)" but it doesn't matter.  The music is a typical mixture of styles but mostly bluesy stuff with a real hard edge.  Rypdal's guitarwork is purely lethal.  After this album the band split and Rypdal headed off into jazz realms with the Min Bul album, this solo album Bleak House, and then his long running career with ECM.  Highly recommended.
    $18.00
  • Great second album from this German underground band.  Trauma was a fine album, but the follow up features a revised lineup and a more mature sound.  The music definitely veered towards the harder side of the progressive spectrum.  Tracks are longer and concepts are more developed.  There seems to be a loosely tied Biblical theme going on.  The album has some beautiful organ work that owes more to Dave Sinclair than Jon Lord.  I do miss the flute/sax work but the guitarwork is subtle and sublime.  Conny Plank produced the album and tied the whole thing together.  One of the great titles from the Brain catalog.  Highly recommended.
    $19.00
  • "Stagnation, formula, expectations – these words have long been banned from the lexicon of LONG DISTANCE CALLING. It is this irreverent attitude that has fueled them to record three albums, play several tours throughout Europe, garner slots on renowned festivals such as Rock am Ring, Summer Breeze, Wave-Gotik-Treffen or Roadburn and even secured them an impressive #36 in the German Media Control Charts. But if you thought these successes would convince LONG DISTANCE CALLING to settle into form with their fourth album, “The Flood Inside”, the band instead attempted an even bolder metamorphosis.Flashback: In early April 2012, LONG DISTANCE CALLING amicably parted ways with founding member and electronic wizard, Reimut von Bonn. Von Bonn’s departure however opened up new possibilities for the remaining members. The band had previously worked with guest-singers such as John Bush (Armored Saint, Anthrax) or Jonas Renkse (Katatonia) and they felt the new material was shaping up differently and gravitating away from purely instrumental rock. “We just noticed that adding a voice simply made sense. Stagnation and special formulas are not our thing, so making the step was easy.” Since all members in LONG DISTANCE CALLING have diverse tastes in music it was easy for them to decide what they were NOT looking for: no screamers or a whiny shoegazers. Instead, a timeless rocking voice in the vein of Faith No More or Soundgarden: a role perfectly suited for Martin “Marsen” Fischer (Pigeon Toe, ex-Fear My Thoughts). “We met Marsen on tours we did together. Hence, we knew each other on a personal level and we were certain that we would match perfectly when it comes to the music. The fact that he is playing keyboards is a nice add-on, as he is also in charge of them live.”Despite the changes, “The Flood Inside” remains intrinsically LONG DISTANCE CALLING. “We questioned a lot and did a whole lot of fine tuning this time. A part is as long as it needs to be, but we took our time to discuss and revise every single one of them. Many ideas make many parts, but a good song always needs a certain flow. That was the overall aim.” The plan came together and resulted in countless parts that should cause the Serotonin to flow. The band further explains: “What really characterizes our sound is the combination of cool and heavy riffs with melodies that come without any kitsch.” The band had guest vocalists before, however this time you don’t just get one track with vocals, but three with the same vocalist.“It is always exciting to see what other people can do with your songs. We as artists as well as our music can only gain from the input. It is all about adding talent and an extra level. The genre is secondary. The range of the album should speak for itself.” Indeed, “The Flood Inside” features collaborations will names as varied as Vincent Cavanagh (Anathema), blues talent Henrik Freischlader and Jahcoozi-mastermind Robot Koch (known from his work with Casper, Max Mutzke or Marteria). Additionally, there is the Norwegian singer/songwriter Petter Carlsen, Tuneverse co-founder Alex Komlew and Mario Cullmann (formerly known as DJ Coolman for Fünf Sterne Deluxe). “We have never bowed down to any rules for what you may or may not do as an instrumental band. It is only us making the rules.”In art, rules exist to be broken. Atmosphere and diversity don’t always conform to the parameters of the 3:30 song structure. Yet “The Flood Inside” [produced by Martin Meinschäfer at Megaphon Tonstudios in Arnsberg, Germany] is a lot more focused and compact than any of its predecessors. “The past 12 months were emotionally draining: charts, splitting with a member, new album and new singer… The Flood Inside is a summary of everything and all the emotions around and within us. That is the not so simple idea behind the title. It shows the entire spectrum of life: joy, grief, euphoria, anger and everything in between. How to deal with emotions is a huge part of everyday life. Nevertheless a lot of things are happening in the grey areas – and we are trying to show those in our music.” "
    $12.00
  • Fifth 3CD set culled from the Historic, Silver, and Ultimate Editions. This disc focuses on the prime years 1976-77.
    $20.00
  • Bad ass fusion session put together by Dixie Dregs keyboardist T Lavitz. The quartet is filled out by heavyweights Dennis Chambers (drums), Jeff Berlin (bass), David Fiuczynski (guitars). I'm not sure how much more I need to say about this - just look at the names and you know what to expect. For my personal taste the guy who really steps forward is Fiuczynski who impresses me more each time I hear something he's a part of. Some of the playing on this disc is so insane I just have to laugh. Highly recommended.
    $15.00