This Bread Is Mine (Digipak)

Third album from this fine Polish prog band finds them stepping up their game even further. Believe is led by former Collage/Satellite guitarist Mirek Gil. Those bands had a decidedly symphonic sound, but with Believe a more modern sound is achieved, moving the band more in the direction of bands like Riverside. One of the key elements of the band is the use of violin and flute, adding a classical dimension and a nice counterpoint to Gil's Gilmour-esque guitar lines. Oh yeah - there is a new vocalist in place. His name is Karol Wróblewski and he's great. His expressiveness reminds me a bit of Mariusz Duda. This is the limited edition digipak that comes with one bonus track. How limited? I don't know but experience with Metal Mind tells me that eventually it will be gone....

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
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Without a Doubt, the bands best effort, I personally wasnt that fond of First cd but it grew on me, second cd was a lot better, New cd with new vocals throw them over the top, Maturing nicely I love the violins and flutes on the bands cds, Nice touch.. ok ok,Ill say it "Buy or Die." B.Ricci
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
Rate: 
0
Tercera producción de estos Polacos, en la cual estrenan nuevo vocalista, el cual posee un muy buen registro, algo parecido al cantante de RIVERSIDE. La verdad es que este nuevo disco es mucho mas moderno y mejor pensado que sus dos antecesores. Para imaginarse la musica de BELIEVE, pensemos en los temas mas misteriosos, progresivos y relajados de RIVERSIDE y reemplacemos los teclados por un excelente violín y tendremos algo parecido a BELIEVE con su tercer album. Hugo Castro Salinas. Santiago de Chile
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
Rate: 
0
Without a Doubt, the bands best effort, I personally wasnt that fond of First cd but it grew on me, second cd was a lot better, New cd with new vocals throw them over the top, Maturing nicely I love the violins and flutes on the bands cds, Nice touch.. ok ok,Ill say it "Buy or Die." B.Ricci
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:58
Rate: 
0
Tercera producción de estos Polacos, en la cual estrenan nuevo vocalista, el cual posee un muy buen registro, algo parecido al cantante de RIVERSIDE. La verdad es que este nuevo disco es mucho mas moderno y mejor pensado que sus dos antecesores. Para imaginarse la musica de BELIEVE, pensemos en los temas mas misteriosos, progresivos y relajados de RIVERSIDE y reemplacemos los teclados por un excelente violín y tendremos algo parecido a BELIEVE con su tercer album. Hugo Castro Salinas. Santiago de Chile
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