Cheating The Polygraph (CD/DVD)

SKU: KSCOPE318
Label:
KScope Records
Category:
Jazz
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CD/DVD digibook.  The DVD includes a 5.1 and DTS surround mix.

"Prog is, at times, a strangely divided world. On one side are the true progressives, fiercely determined to push music forward into the future. On the other side stand the stuck-in-the-mud individuals whose primary objective is to cling tenaciously to the ways of the past.

Cheating the Polygraph is guaranteed to ruffle the latter camp’s feathers. A collection of Porcupine Tree songs reworked using big-band instrumentation and a modern-minded approach to arrangement, calling this album quirky would be something of an understatement.

Some are likely to struggle to get past the superficial level of instrumentation, timbre, and tone – but beneath it can be felt the pounding pulse of pure creativity. On Cheating the Polygraph, timeless prog-rock tunes such as The Sound of Muzak, Heartattack in a Layby, Futile, and this long-player’s title track are all given superficially jazzy makeovers that actually owe as much to the influence of Frank Zappa as they do to less batshit-crazy genius bandleaders of decades past.

For me, the band-falling-down-a-spiral-staircase groove of The Pills I’m Taking is a definite highlight – but that does nothing to take away from the masterful musicianship on display throughout every last microsecond of Cheating the Polygraph‘s running time. This eight-track album took five years to make, and the labours and love that have been poured into its creation are as tangible as they could possibly be when communicated through ones, zeroes, and soundwaves. Unsurprisingly flawless, but also unexpectedly addictive and moreish." - The Musical Melting Pot

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    $11.00
  • After toying with the neoprog genre for some time, Portugal's Forgotten Suns lets its freak flag fly and goes full bore with a fantastic prog metal disc. The band is led by virtuoso guitarist Ricardo Falcao who has definitely spent some time listening to John Petrucci. The band has a new vocalist in Nio Nunes. He's got a great voice and fits into the new found sound perfectly. So what is the new sound exactly? Well it consists of more than a few dips into the Dream Theater pool - laser beam keyboard solos, stunning guitar solos, and expressive vocals. There is no doubt - while there are some prog rock underpinnings the Marillion influences have gone by the wayside - this is as good a prog metal album you will hear this year. If you dig chops from hell but with melodies that will stick with you - you need to hear this disc. Think of this band as Portugal's answer to Spheric Universe Experience. Buy or die!!
    $3.00
  • Chon are a (mostly) instrumental prog band based out of San Diego.  Their music is very intricate twin guitar, bass and drums stuff that reminds a bit of Gordian Knot, At War With Self, Scale The Summit and some of the Crimson related side projects.""On the back of three albums in two years, Chon have found themselves nestled into a curiously underpopulated pocket of instrumental prog-rock that you can relax to. Though not particularly big names yet, their debut full-length album, Grow, makes great inroads to rectify such injustice. 12 tracks clocking in at a deceptively paltry 35 minutes may discourage some, but it’s worth noting that this is from a band that think very little of suspensive introductions – what the album offers instead is an unperturbed and persistently tight medley of poetic guitar noodling.That is not to say Chon chug along obstinately with the raw, earthy power of Animals as Leaders, a band they have supported on tour. Grow instead emits an overarching sense of polished calmness, one that lays a solid foundation for an album speckled with brief moments of mischievous, virtuosic bedlam.A very brief and airy introductory track is punctured by an immediate cutting guitar solo in the opening moments of ‘Story’, before all instruments fall into a synchronised rhythm. The two guitars swap periodically between unison and polythymic riffing, something that is impressively replicated by the drums later on. These moments are peppered throughout the album and appear sporadic in nature, when in reality they’re incredibly well calculated and stand as a testament to Chon’s amazing compositional capacity.Following track ‘Fall’ exhibits much of the same, with a searching chordal structure and tonal modulation that adheres to a more progressive jazz context, the kind peddled by bands such as Phronesis. This, ‘Book’ and ‘Splash’ display a distinct melodic prowess that is hammered home with constant repetition, underpinned by Nathan Camarena’s unfathomable dexterity on the drums.Drew Pelisek comes into his own in ‘Can’t Wait’ and ‘Echo’, both of which employ his vocals with such grounding assurance that it’s a wonder why only one sixth of the album features them. These tracks, along with ‘Suda’ and ‘But’, are reminiscent of Scale the Summit and Vasudeva during their most contemplative passages. ‘Knot’ and ‘Perfect Pillow’ offer the exact opposite, a distortion-laden procession, reminiscent of those bands in full flow.Most tracks in Grow follow a similar pattern and personal preference eventuates as the tune that sticks most potently in your head. But from an album that offers a plethora under the direction of a truly competent band, they’re likely to stick for a while." - Counteract
    $12.00
  • "These guys might be late to the party, but deserve every bit of your attention regardless. This album really took me unawares, being my first experience with this fairly new yet incredibly accomplished sounding female fronted Australian unit. Their seemingly auto-generated band name may not inspire a lot of confidence, but nonetheless, on Liberator, Divine Ascension serve up progressive power metal of the highest rank. Really any power metal fan craving something heavy and guitar driven is urged in the strongest possible terms to have a look.Vigorous and eager to prove itself at every turn, this is a very full-bodied, attacking presentation, almost bringing Outworld to mind in its all-out directness. For prog/power, Liberator is a veritable ass-stomping of ripping riffs and lead runs, and a metal album first and foremost. Think Mercenary's crunching, at times Gothenburg-flavored axework and you're close. Neck muscles aching, airguitar strings breaking; not what I typically look to this sub-genre for, but there you have it. Keyboards and symphonic elements are given no less priority, being remarkably well arranged and produced and naturally composed in harmony with the metal. Orchestral arrangements in the vein of Rhapsody and Nightwish are employed, as are more electronic strains of bands like Pagan's Mind and Edenbridge. There's a lot going on on top of the already busy guitar work, but every piece of it is complementary, making for music that is constantly epic, and constantly heavy as bricks without the need to sacrifice one for the other. Sit back and soak in the chorus of "Stronger": total Within Temptation-style bombast and grandeur ala "The Howling," but made even more intense by big, riffy guitars that chug and harmonize along with some truly serene keyboard arrangements. It's one of the most stirring, spine-chilling metal moments I've heard in years.The label "progressive" in metal is elusive and subject to debate, but these guys I think make a decent claim for it, other than through sheer genre trappings (i.e. sounding more like Symphony X than Helloween). Key and time changes abound, keyboards and guitars play off each other in creative ways, and individual riffs and whole song structures both often detour from paths conventional. The band is confident in their ability to draw in the listener by piling on cool instrumental parts, and so the songs on Liberator often take a minute or so to establish before the vocals start doing their part, without ever feeling slow in getting to the point. So much going on and so much of it good: between all instruments, most songs here carry enough good ideas to provide for two songs for other bands. This is not as restrained and subtle an affair as something like The Black Halo (although Kamelot's heavier bits are at times not a far off comparison for style), but there's nary a sense of overreaching or a "more is less"-kind of effect. The intro of "Hideaway", by Gods go jam that shit: somber yet lush ambience straight out of a movie score, then razor sharp Children of Bodom-like axe ripping ("Black Widow" is a good point of comparison for the whole intro) that twists and mutates a bit until SMASH descend the fast double bass drums interlocked with another rousing riff that just leaps from the speakers – so much is accomplished within the first minute, and hey, there's the splendid remaining 80% of the song waiting to greet you beyond that! The album as whole is truly an exhilirating but also dynamic and not at all wearying listen.Vocalist Jennifer Borg is a somewhat unconventional but expert choice, as she delivers a more restrained performance than the rest of the group. Not weak or unenthusiastic; restrained, like the best kind of actor who knows to best serve the movie or play at hand by stepping into and becoming a character without feeling the need to draw attention to oneself by "putting on a show." Big vocal acrobatics or soothing, "angelic" stylings expected of female vox in a symphonic metal band are not what she's about, and needn't be. Utilizing a lower and narrower range than usual for the style and putting aside excessive drama, Borg's vocal lines give off so much soul, power and depth with subtle elements. All in all, a mature (horribly cliché word in music critique, but I insist) and dignified effort that contributes a good deal of artistry and uniqueness to the package.Throughout the album's 64 minute filler-free runtime, it amazes me how many typical genre pitfalls the Aussie sextet manages to sidestep. Excessive and confusing technicality for the sake of being "prog" that just kills the flow? Nope. Dragging "atmospheric" sections where nothing happens just to have variation? Also not here. Aiming for "epic" but arriving at "pretentious?" Look elsewhere! At least the closing acoustic ballad is an insufferable cheesefest, right? Actually, power/prog's poignant answer to "More than Words" is more like it, what with its percussive guitar slapping bringing that one to mind. If I'm going to dock the album for SOMETHING, well, "The Final Stand" does feature a real pet peeve of mine: that gimmick where the sound mix goes from demo/wet towel on speakers at its onset, to proper studio quality at a flip of a switch (e.g. Slayer - Ghosts of War). I find it overused and generic to the point of befitting the band moniker, but it doesn't hurt the song much and I've heard it done worse.Prog/power is rarely where I look for new metal these days; the genre's heyday is long gone and that may be for the best. That's not to say I'll disregard an island of brilliance like this one though. Good art is good art and while Liberator may sound a decade old, it still exhibits an identity of its own, cool chops aplenty and little triteness. Could Australia simply be a decade behind on this brand of metal, and thus less mined for talent than Europe or South America? Oh, I do hope. For the follow-up, I'd be curious to see how DA can expand their sound from here; perhaps adding elements from more modern metal would help revitalize the genre some? Until then, this is one shining example of tried-and-true that I wouldn't want my worst enemy to miss out on." - Metal Archives
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  • Kaipa's second album didn't present anything radically different from the first album and that's a good thing.  Its simply beautiful symphonic rock in the tradition of Yes and Genesis.  The only negative is that keyboardist Hans Lundin sings in Swedish but his voice is strong so its not unpleasant.  I'm not quite sure why Decca didn't force them to sing in English. This 2015 remastered edition arrives with four bonus tracks.""Inget Nytt Under Solen" was KAIPA's 2nd release and is another wonderful release which must be heard. "Inget Nytt Under Solen" has all the elements you would want in a progressive rock band... beautiful captivating songs with superb musicianship. Ronie Stolt's (FLOWER KINGS) impregnates this album with his accurate and lively guitar work, Tomas Eriksson handles most of the vocals and adds some real solid punchy bass lines, Hans Lundin brings his analog keyboard wizardry while Ingemar Bergman delivers some solid percussion throughout. All the songs as very well constructed and are given lots of space the breathe and create some lovely atmospheres. This album opens with an epic 21 minute suite "Skenet Bedrar" which is simply brilliant (must be heard!!!). Vocals are in Swedish except for the bonus numbers which introduce the world to English lyrics in an attempt to attract the world to KAIPA's talents. Overall I love KAIPA's music and "Inget Nytt Under Solen" is a solid offering which fans of FLOWER KINGS, ANYONE'S DAUGHTER etc. will love and treasure..." - ProgArchives
    $12.00
  • "It has become patently unfair to review a Luca Turilli creation as a “metal album.” No matter what you call it… “cinematic metal,” “symphonic metal,” “classical metal” – Turilli composes musicscapes beyond comparison. While he will never be held to the unattainable standard of a modern Mozart and Beethoven – the giants who receive 100% critical acclaim whether deserved or not – Luca can easily draw comparisons to modern composers like John Williams, Hans Zimmer and Jerry Goldsmith.With his composition company created, his ability to mix both old world classical and modern/new world classical with metallic elements is unprecedented in heavy metal. This music transcends the metal world and thrusts deeply into mainstream music and movie soundtrack lore. On “Prometheus – Symphonia Ignis Divinus” – Turilli uses both dark and light elements, a real combination of “Prophets of the Lost Eclipse” and “The Infinite Wonders of Creation,” to create a stunning masterpiece that trumps the impossibly towering “Ascending to Infinity.”It is literally pointless for fans that do not enjoy meticulously orchestrated cinematic metal to run out to buy “Prometheus,” so just stop right here. Long time Luca fans, read on! Imagine, if you will, being on board the Hollywood backlot tram tour, only its much cooler than you can imagined. As you pass by various sets for movies like “Solomon” (with “King Solomon and the 72 Names of God”) “Lord of the Rings” (with “One Ring to Rule Them All”), “Valhalla Rising” (with “Yggdrasil”) – you are whisked away on a musical journey that is a rich and pure as the breathtaking mountains, valleys, lakes and oceans. Luca creates music that conjures images teaming with life that flash on every note, which is as extraordinary as the breathtaking compositions themselves.After the accident that nearly took the hand and career of guitarist Dominique “Dodo” Leurquin, his presence on “Prometheus” is a both relieving and required. It’s also a welcome sight to see drummer Alex Landenburg (21 Octayne/Mekong Delta), who joined the band before the release of “Ascending Into Infinity” in 2012, but who hasn’t played on a release until “Prometheus.” A favorite skin basher for many years, it’s a triumphant display from one of the best and hardest working in the business. Sound wise…albums do not get much more pristine.With Luca at the helm along with his team of Sebastian Roeder (recording) and Christoph Stickel (mastering) – “Prometheus” is a sonic jewel. Having freed himself from the binding storylines of the pre-split Rhapsody/Rhapsody of Fire days, Luca seems bent on raising the bar with everything he does – becoming part opera, part soundtrack, part metal, part symphony.Where tracks like “Rosenkreuz,” “Prometheus” and “Yggdrasil” ratchet up the heaviness that metalheads expect (notably those fans who have become disillusioned at the orchestrated distractions away from guitar), other songs bring a beautiful “non-metal” element, best represented through “Il Tempo Degli Dei” – which has quickly grown to be the go-to favorite after a mediocre first listen (it sounds immensely happy) – and “Notturno,” the operatic ballad showcasing uber-talented vocalists Alessandro Conti and Fench soprano Emilie Ragni.Once again, the album’s keystone monument is “Of Michael the Archangel and Lucifer’s Fall” – this time with the second part, subtitled “Codex Nemesis.” Remembering greatness levels reaching stupid proportions on “Ascending to Infinity,” the second part matches but comes from a different melodic angle.Overall, “Prometheus - Symphonia Ignis Divinus” ties elements from all of Luca’s previous efforts – with a heavy dose of “Prophet of the Last Eclipse,” nods to the Dreamquest release “Lost Horizons,” and a victory lap from “Ascending to Infinity.” If you are a fan of Turilli, there is little doubt you will gush all over “Prometheus.” If you find the cinematic, operatic and symphonic elements a little too over the top for your metal cravings, then steer clear. One thing is certain, the only composer on earth who can top Luca Turilli is the man himself.Highs: High expectations realized from the world's best composer.Lows: With Luca's Rhapsody, either you find it amazing or way too over the top to be respectable.Bottom line: "Prometheus" may seem like an "Ascending to Infinity" victory lap, but it goes way deeper than what you hear on the first listen." - Metal Underground
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  • "I actually found Carving an Icon quite the retroactively blind purchase, suspiciously ironic since I had been tracking this project for quite a while and assumed I knew what to expect from Morfeus in regards to his avant-garde songwriting and abstruse, distinctive approach to the axes. From this isolated point of view, his sonic handprint is indeed all over Viper Solfa, making the unreasonably long wait for Dimension F3H’s This Mechanical World somewhat easier to mitigate since the dude has at least kept the old creative mind juiced as ever. What I wasn’t quite able to ready myself for was the remaining contributions, hardly something to just gloss over, as Viper Solfa is presented as something of a “supergroup” after all as opposed to a mere side-project.Ronny Thorsen supposedly leads Viper Solfa for all formal intents and purposes, the proclivity for many a conflagration granted by his burly speaking timbre and rousing death roars is a concerted force to be reckoned with. It can be argued that he is just another head in the pack, hardly boasting the standalone merit to turn one’s knees to jelly, but Viper Solfa isn’t done yet. The centrepiece of the band isn’t actually Thorsen, but Miriam Renvåg, whose swaying, affecting timbre opens doors unexpected for the band both conceptually and stylistically. So while I can’t feign shock now, I do recall bemused skepticism at the introduction of such audaciously disparate factors. Renvåg’s voice is very sleek and refined, with an almost pop-caliber cadre of appeals that land Viper Solfa closer to bands such as earlier Sirenia once the vocal trade-off between Thorsen is taken into account. It isn’t what I expected, having come into this project for Morfeus alone, but I certainly applaud Viper Solfa for attempting to merge sodden, opaque, death growls with avant-garde female vocal idiosyncrasy.With nearly all preconceptions espoused by this point, and with Renvåg’s quivering and psychedelic banshee wails taking their mental toll, I realized that there are plenty of parallels that can be drawn between Dimension F3H and Viper Solfa. Symphonics are used sparingly and as punctuation as opposed to the primary arsenal. Morfeus is basically the main songwriter here, and he is still shipping out crunchers of high order in the modern black/death format he began employing in earnest on Legacy of Evil during his waning years with Limbonic Art. In fact, the hard-lined, basal distortion sounds very similar to that record, and as the rollicking, flighty webbing of tremolos grow thicker and denser, Carving an Icon hammers out a welcoming mat to the most unexpected clientele.This ends up being the album’s tripping point, however, as far too much time is spent grooming vocal melodies that sound almost shoehorned in just for the sake of keeping the singers occupied. Thorsen’s petulant rasp gets one-upped by Renvåg’s (sometimes sorely overacted) caterwauling, and the end result borders on the monotonous more often than it should. The band still makes a good show of their missteps, what with a dense, abysmal grandeur pervading the nether reaches of what is honestly a relatively compact and easy listen on the whole, but these shortcomings remain. Carving an Icon may not be a masterpiece, or even the best outlet for all of the talents involved, but I can promise that it sounds like absolutely nothing you have heard lately, or likely will in the near future. At the end of the day, a neat project that delivered at least a few truly lethal numbers like “Whispers and Storms,” “Deranged” and most notably the floods of choppy, aggrandized viscera that embody the aptly-titled “Vulture Kingdom.” My expectations are not in line with the norm due to my familiarity with Morfeus’ back-catalogue, so take of this what you will, but Carving an Icon got more than a few spins out of me."
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  • Monumental album from Ritchie Blackmore/Ronnie James Dio. Worth it just for "Stargazer" alone. Remastered edition. Essential.
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  • Remastered edition of the band's classic 4th album with two bonus tracks.  Its a concept album that literally defined classical rock.  Sure its pop oriented but the overarching progressive elements are prominent through out.  Highly recommended and at 5 bucks a steal.
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  • "One of the most influential heavy metal albums of the 1990s, Vulgar Display of Power is just what is says: a raw, pulverizing, insanely intense depiction of naked rage and hostility that drains its listeners and pounds them into submission. Even the "ballads," "This Love" and "Hollow," have thunderingly loud, aggressive chorus sections. Preaching power through strength and integrity, Phil Anselmo discards any further attempts at singing in favor of a militaristic bark and an unhinged roar, while the crystal-clear production sets Diamond Darrell's pummeling riffs against a rhythmic backdrop so thunderously supportive that Darrell often solos without underlying rhythm guitar parts. The album again follows Cowboys from Hell's strategy of stacking the best songs at the beginning and letting their momentum carry the listener through the rest, but the riffs and sonic textures are more consistently interesting this time around. Pantera's thick-sounding, post-hardcore power metal and outraged, testosterone-drenched intensity would help pave the way for alternative metal acts like Korn and Tool; Vulgar Display of Power is the best distillation of those virtues." - All Music Guide
    $9.00
  • The original version of Rïah Sahïltaahk that was recorded in 1971 is featured on the album 1001° Centigrade (vol. 2). But at the time, its composer, Christian Vander, was unhappy with the arrangement written by the group. This radically new version, adapted to suit the group’s current line-up, is more faithful to the spirit of Magma’s music and its uniquely weird and wonderful prog-rock style."
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  • "Cricklewood Green provides the best example of Ten Years After's recorded sound. On this album, the band and engineer Andy Johns mix studio tricks and sound effects, blues-based song structures, a driving rhythm section, and Alvin Lee's signature lightning-fast guitar licks into a unified album that flows nicely from start to finish. Cricklewood Green opens with a pair of bluesy rockers, with "Working on the Road" propelled by a guitar and organ riff that holds the listener's attention through the use of tape manipulation as the song develops. "50,000 Miles Beneath My Brain" and "Love Like a Man" are classics of TYA's jam genre, with lyrically meaningless verses setting up extended guitar workouts that build in intensity, rhythmically and sonically. The latter was an FM-radio staple in the early '70s. "Year 3000 Blues" is a country romp sprinkled with Lee's silly sci-fi lyrics, while "Me and My Baby" concisely showcases the band's jazz licks better than any other TYA studio track, and features a tasty piano solo by Chick Churchill. It has a feel similar to the extended pieces on side one of the live album Undead. "Circles" is a hippie-ish acoustic guitar piece, while "As the Sun Still Burns Away" closes the album by building on another classic guitar-organ riff and more sci-fi sound effects." - All Music Guide
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  • "Symphonic rock icon Lana Lane proudly announces her new studio album, Red Planet Boulevard. The new album follows Lana's 2005 art rock masterpiece, Lady Macbeth, and her highly acclaimed 2006 classic rock covers album, Gemini. Red Planet Boulevard is a melodic rock album that showcases Lana's legendary vocals with timeless songwriting all produced in a modern symphonic rock environment. The atmosphere of the album is both spacious and grand, soaring melodies and intimate phrases play against lush arrangements of guitar and keyboards, all intertwining in a compelling tango of orchestration that is pure Lana Lane.Recorded in The Netherlands and in San Francisco, California, Red Planet Boulevard combines the feeling of European precision and old world mystery with the Bay Area's legendary style and mood that is pure Northern California magic. The melange of locations shows in the album's production that is both bombastic and moody, clear and heavy, intimate and extroverted. Producer / keyboardist Erik Norlander took on bass guitar duties as well for this release continuing in the role he played on the 2007 Lady Macbeth tour. Long time collaborators, Dutchmen Peer Verschuren (guitar) and Ernst Van Ee (drums), complete the instrumental trio in what Norlander calls "a sort of 'Led Zeppelin' instrumentation where we have guitar, drums and a bass playing keyboardist."The Red Planet Boulevard musician lineup is indeed the most compact to appear on a Lana Lane album, but the trio does not falter in creating the massive symphonic rock sound for which Lana Lane is so well known. Walls of guitars, landscapes of keyboards and tectonic plates of bass and drums drive the arrangements with the energy and exuberance of a band that indeed went straight from the road into the studio. That touring seasoning shows in the subtle complexities of Red Planet Boulevard. This is a band that is experienced and skilled in their craft all supporting a legendary vocalist who is at the top of her game.Twelve all original songs compose Red Planet Boulevard. The heavy rockers "Into the Fire", "Capture the Sun" and "Angels and Magicians" along with the power ballad "Jessica" harken back to Lana's 1995 debut release, Love is an Illusion, while in contrast, the anthemic "Shine", "The Frozen Sea" and "No Tears Left" have a distinctly 21st century sound that fits perfectly with today's iPod generation. The uptempo "Stepford, USA" re-tells the story of the quiet rural town with a dark secret, while "The Sheltering Sorrow" is a heart wrenching ballad that is epic in scale with links back to the late 60s majesty of early symphonic rock. The album concludes with the finale and title track, "Red Planet Boulevard", where themes from each of the album's songs is reprised in a grand orchestral rock style.Artwork is once again provided by Polish surrealist Jacek Yerka who has painted the covers for Lana's many past masterworks. Photos for the album were shot by noted San Francisco photographer Mark Leialoha who brings his own style and vision to the Lana Lane production team. Fans of melodic rock, symphonic style and the amazing female rock voice, your light is green: Make the turn onto Red Planet Boulevard!"
    $6.00
  • As you all know by now, the tracks on Made In Japan were culled from three nights of performances of the Japanese 1972 tour.  This is a new 2CD version of the album.  Disc one features a 2014 remaster of the original mix.  Disc two features the encores from all three nights - remastered from the original analogue stereo masters.
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