Dark Passenger

SKU: BT042CD
Label:
Bakerteam Records
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"Well, Italy is known for being a country with extremes: on one hand, you have very good bands of extreme Metal; on the other, bands of more melodic and technical Metal. And the both ways granted the world with excellent works. Going into a more Power/Progressive Metal way, coming from Trieste (Milan), we have the trio STARBYNARY, which released their first work, the album “Dark Passenger”.

We can say that they follow a technical and heavy path of the style, making an elegant work on the same vein from old SYMPHONY X, but not eclectic as DREAM THEATER (so you won’t hear elements from Pop and Jazz on this album). Excellent vocals (a legacy from Italy in terms of Metal), very good riffs and solos (being melodic, heavy and technical in the due proportions), good rhythmic kitchen and powerful and grandiose keyboards parts is what they offer in a musical work full of elegance and weight. And we must accept it with opened heart and soul, for their efforts in create good music had success!

The sound production is fine, granting their music a clear and heavy sound quality, so we really can hear all the musical arrangements and little details that make the difference. Yes, they are near perfection on sound quality. To speak about this album is a pleasure, for the trio’s music is wonderful, flows spontaneously into our ears and souls, and really conquest, but to name songs on this album as the best ones is an act of injustice. From “…Dawn of Evil” to “The End Begins” (a very long song, divided in three excellent parts), they show that they made their songs with hearts and wisdom. So hear it, and you’ll understand what your Ol’ Big Daddy here is trying to say." - Metal Temple

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