Dark Passion Play (Collector's Edition)

Special 2 CD collector's edition features an instrumental orchestral version of the album (DO I HEAR KARAOKE?) plus a bonus track.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
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0
Absolutely, and w/out a doubt, this will change Goth for the better. This is the best Nightwish has ever done. It will make you say Tara who? No more straining operetics. Buy this Cd, and enter the new realm of majesty in Metal. Ten Stars-jw
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
This album is phenominal! The new singer is a completely different sound than Tarja but the music is still classic Nightwish... and Holopainen is at the top of his game on this one. I have never been so assaulted (in a good way) by such a massive wall of sound... it is an experience listening to this album! The new singer gives them more of a pop sound (which isn't bad) than a "gothic metal" sound which I find interesting since they were such an inspiration to many of the top gothic metal bands (like my personal favorite Epica). I was also very pleased to see such a strong presence by Marco both in songwriting and vocals. I have always loved his voice, which manages to be both beautiful and manly at the same time. This album has everything, from their signature epic length soundtrack-like songs, to radio-friendly hits, even an instrumental that sounds a little like bluegrass gone metal. Interesting tidbit about this album - their use of the London Philharmonic made this the most expensive record ever to come out of Finland. It was worth the money though - there is nothing like a real orchestra backing up a metal band!
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Absolutely, and w/out a doubt, this will change Goth for the better. This is the best Nightwish has ever done. It will make you say Tara who? No more straining operetics. Buy this Cd, and enter the new realm of majesty in Metal. Ten Stars-jw
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
This album is phenominal! The new singer is a completely different sound than Tarja but the music is still classic Nightwish... and Holopainen is at the top of his game on this one. I have never been so assaulted (in a good way) by such a massive wall of sound... it is an experience listening to this album! The new singer gives them more of a pop sound (which isn't bad) than a "gothic metal" sound which I find interesting since they were such an inspiration to many of the top gothic metal bands (like my personal favorite Epica). I was also very pleased to see such a strong presence by Marco both in songwriting and vocals. I have always loved his voice, which manages to be both beautiful and manly at the same time. This album has everything, from their signature epic length soundtrack-like songs, to radio-friendly hits, even an instrumental that sounds a little like bluegrass gone metal. Interesting tidbit about this album - their use of the London Philharmonic made this the most expensive record ever to come out of Finland. It was worth the money though - there is nothing like a real orchestra backing up a metal band!
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  • "Esteemed international metal label Season of Mist began pursuing the two-guitar, three-singer Vancouver quartet Anciients after hearing a series of early mixes for what would become the band’s debut album. It’s easy to imagine what initially lured the diverse label to the band: The tracks on Anciients' nine-song entrance, Heart of Oak, are hyperkinetic but heavily anchored. They surround the hooks you might expect from a Baroness anthem with tangential and technical playing that trends toward prog rock but stops short of Opeth or Enslaved’s maze of redirections. Anciients excel at muscular and agile guitar solos, while the guitarists, Kenny Cook and Chris Dyck, also volley the vocal duties, jumping from death metal bellow to pop-metal lift. It’s exciting stuff, really-- often complicated without seeming excessive, skillful but soulful, approachable but not pedestrian. At its best, Heart of Oak is immediate and electrifying, an album that suggests Anciients’ half-prog, half-pop metal is bound for big stages.By this point, though, you’ve probably wondered what’s up with the band’s name: Why, after all, add an extraneous vowel to a perfectly good handle? That excess is emblematic of Anciients' chief musical foible-- time and again, they add unnecessary sidecars to songs that would have been more effective left alone. Of these nine tracks, only one doesn’t break the six-minute mark. The exception is a tender but predictable instrumental, a mid-album interlude meant as a tribute to some late friends and family members. But the rest of these things are hyperbolic monsters that speak to a rookie act attempting to get through all of their influences at once, even though three of the members have been playing together in other groups for a decade. They are trying to make a very big point all the time, and the weight collapses in on itself. “The Longest River”, a nine-minute cut with a woefully apropos handle, swivels from acoustic foreboding to contract-and-expand thrash, from distended solos to dense stomp, from sweet-singing verses to growled impasses. None of it’s bad, but none of it is astounding enough to pardon the way it obviates an excellent refrain.That’s a consistent problem for Heart of Oak, a record that adulterates many incredibly exciting moments with consistent excess. “Flood and Fire”, a late-album highlight, seems more like a string of song pieces than a proper song, with a righteous solo swiping momentum from a great chorus that, in turn, stymies several great and grim hardcore shout-alongs. As Cook told Metal Underground, album opener “Raise the Sun” initially keys on Fleet Foxes before leaping into a verse so sticky and warm that ASG or Torche might like to have it back. Elsewhere, the song convincingly invokes metalcore and psychedelic rock, hangman riffs and fleeting blast beats. The parts are exhilarating, but strung together with more enthusiasm than wisdom so they’re mostly exhausting. Taken a track or two at a time, Heart of Oak is manageable; make it from end to end, though, and it’s difficult not to feel frustrated by the fatigue.These complaints aren’t meant as some preclusive warning against Heart of Oak; rather, they’re only an honest assessment of a band that, in years to come, is probably going to be great. If Anciients choose to venture further deeper into labyrinthine prog, they’ve got the riffs and rhythms to make it compelling over the long haul. They seem as steeped in the suffocation of black metal from Scandinavia as they do in the sweetness of Allman licks from Georgia, as capable of thrash sprints as they are stoner lulls. And as the pealing organ and rumbling field recordings of the gorgeous (but, again, incredibly excessive) closer “For Lisa” suggest, they bring a wide-eyed approach to their music. Heart of Oak doesn’t have a compelling, cohesive narrative thrust, but there’s always time to buy a book of folklore, right?Alternately, Anciients could choose the route of bands such as Baroness or even Mastodon, embedding that sharp technicality within songs that make their points with concision that doesn’t forsake intricacy. The kernels of these songs are strong enough to suggest that they’re not very far off-- that is, their biggest problem as a band isn’t a dearth of ideas but, rather, discretion with those ideas. Anciients are exciting new prospects, with or without that cumbersome vowel chaiin." - Pitchfork
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