Deep Down Heavy

Deep Down Heavy

BY Downes, Bob

(Customer Reviews)
$17.00
$ 10.20
SKU: ECLEC2399
Label:
Esoteric Recordings
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"ESOTERIC RECORDINGS are proud to announce the first official release of the classic 1970 album by BOB DOWNES "Deep Down Heavy”. Celebrated Jazz saxophonist and flautist BOB DOWNES’ album first appeared on EMI’s budget MFP label, arguably the only Progressive Jazz album ever issued by the label. The work was a collaboration with lyricist Robert Cockburn and was an outstanding eccentric example of Jazz Rock with Progressive and even Psychedelic influences. The music and songs featured contributions from the leading lights of British Jazz Rock such as CHRIS SPEDDING, RAY RUSSELL and ALAN RUSHTON, interspersed with poetry by Robert Cockburn (recorded on location on London buses and Underground trains).
The jazz groove of the music was present on tracks such as ‘Walking On’, ‘Don’t Let Tomorrow Get You Down’ and ‘Poplar Cheam’, leading the album to be sampled three decades later by DJs and Mixers.
Remastered from the original master tapes, this Esoteric Recordings reissue is long overdue. The time is right to rediscover the open music of "Deep Down Heavy”, one of THE lost treasures of the Progressive and Psychedelic era."

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