Divided Alien Playbax 80 (SHM-CD)

Divided Alien Playbax 80 (SHM-CD)

BY Allen, Daevid

(Customer Reviews)
$14.00
$ 8.40
SKU: VICP-70080
Label:
Victor (Japan)
Category:
Progressive Rock
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High quality Japanese SHM-CD in a mini-LP sleeve.

"Sucessfully experimental album ahead of it's time.

Influenced by the cutting edge musical experiments that abounded in late '70s New York Daevid radically changed direction from his previous acoustic troubadour style. Utilising the then embryonic sampling and video technology he radically cut-up, re-mixed and over dubbed the New York Gong LP 'About Time' to produce 'Playbax 80'. It resulted in this stunning and at times assaulting set, and it's still way out there."

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