Everflow

Everflow

BY Voiciano

(Customer Reviews)
$15.00
$ 9.00
SKU: VO1001
Label:
Private Release
Category:
Acoustic
Add to wishlist 

"VOICIANO is the new acoustic project of the EDENBRIDGE's Sabine Edelsbacher (vocals) and Lanvall (grand piano, acoustic guitars and other string instruments, percussion). 

VOICIANO is based on acoustic instruments exclusively, mainly the grand piano. However, many other instruments like acoustic guitars, hammered dulcimer, kacapi, bouzouki, mandolin, saz and diverse percussion instruments, can be heard on the album. There is also a real string orchestra, Junge Philharmonie Freistadt.

The music for "Everflow" was recorded almost exclusively without click tracks — in other words, without any predetermined tempo — which accentuates the liveliness and soul of the songs. The piano parts were recorded live.

Says Lanvall: "The idea [for VOICIANO] was born after our EDENBRIDGE promotion acoustic show in Vietnam.

"In 2010, Sabine and I flew to Vietnam for a 10-minute showcase to perform three songs at the 1000 Years Hanoi festival. The simplicity of the whole process concerning the rehearsals and the show were pure fun for us. You just request a microphone and a grand piano, enter the stage and perform.

"When we came back, I went through my files and piles of sketches of numerous ideas, which remained unused to this point. I was astonished how many great songs I found in layouts in this acoustic form. This inspired me immediately to write completely new songs additionally."

Adds Sabine: "I always had the idea for a solo project with more balladesque songs. VOICIANO is exactly what I had in mind.

"In VOICIANO, my voice gets more room in all its nuances. This is what I enjoy, of course. Furthermore, I will bring myself in into the lyrics. The mystic atmosphere of our songs will remain, of course. I think we cannot do it differently; it's a part of us."

Sabine and Lanvall were also able to procure some great guests for the album. Most of them are longtime friends with prominent names.

Says Lanvall: "After the huge production of the last EDENBRIDGE album, 'The Bonding', it was extremely important to gain distance musically and be involved in something which is different.

"The reduction in the music and the process to record much of the music live gave me tremendous joy.

"I believe that everybody who loves EDENBRIDGE will love VOICIANO too, although it shows us from a completely different side.

"When I began to arrange the songs, I was immensely touched by the feeling and the souls of the songs. This inspired me to learn new instruments like the hammered dulcimer, which can be heard in a couple of songs and creates an own mystic atmosphere."

The "Everflow" cover artwork was created by Günter Leitenbauer and can be seen below.

Will Sabine and Lanvall now concentrate on VOICIANO exclusively?

Says Lanvall: "No, of course not. VOICIANO is a project among our main band, EDENBRIDGE, to live out this faible for acoustic music. All songs would also work with just vocals and piano in the live situation. I think that after this album I will also be really inspired for a next big EDENBRIDGE album!"

Adds Sabine: "I am convinced that we will attract a bigger audience apart from the metal scene with VOICIANO. Even better when they learn about EDENBRIDGE then. This will be a total win/win situation."

Concludes Lanvall: "With all the wonderful experiences we made with the crowdfunding action related to our last album 'The Bonding', where we were able to outfinance the whole orchestra costs. We wanna continue this way with our new project VOICIANO, and here even more than in the past. In recent times the relationship fan to musician/band is more important than ever. It was extremely enriching to see in the process of 'The Bonding', how many people wish to support 'real' music. Therefore we wanna bring in our fans to join in as part of a record label and advance suppliers, and came up with some special and interesting packages. With your pre-orders and sponsoring donations, you guarantee the best possible production of the VOICIANO album 'Everflow'."
 

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • "The rise of Greek power metaller, Firewind, has give the world two new metal heroes. They are Bob Katsionis (keyboards) and Gus G. Both are skillful musicians, now world class respected. Bob released his solo album in 2012, but only in March 2014 that Gus G finally catch up with a release his long waited solo album. Gus G's solo album titled as I Am the Fire, he is well backed by world class musicians and singers. As Gus G was previously active in Ozzy Osbourne team, the styles of heavy metal and hard rock in this solo album is not surprising, a bit step further away from his main band of Firewind, which is a power metal band.Let's see the two most interesting tracks by observing the guess list. Vengeance is back by Megadeth's David Ellefson. This is instrumental track for sure, the riffs are heavy, fast double pedal drum and of course Gus' shred + David's bass attack was more than cool enough. The second instrumental is fall to "Billy Sheehan's track". Terrified is yet another ultra fast shreds with a title that reminds us to Scarified by Racer X. Both instrumental tracks is enough to made guitars fans demand an exclusive instrumental guitar album from Gus!On the vocalized songs, they are all excellence. Mat Levén is acting as host singer, he tackled four tracks. From the opener My Will Be Done, a straight forward modern rock tunes, then Blame It On Me, a happier glam metal one. On the later are Eyes Wide Open, this is kind of late '80s hair metal scenes feel. The last from Mat is End Of The Line, acoustic ballad in the style of wild wild west. Mat Levén was once Firewind singer also.I Am The Fire is a collaboration with Devour The Day / Blake Allison. The riffs quickly brings us to modern nu-metal feels, this concurred with the style of singing, the song's structures, and utilizing of choruses, which is in the spirit of alternative metal. Long Way Down on the other hand is the only female guess track with Alexia Rodiguez. Alexia is from the band Eyes Set To Kill. The song can be categorizing as a heavier version Evanescenes style. Jacob Bunton from Lynam / Adler fame contributed in Just Can't Let Go. This is yet again in alternative / US modern metal feel. Michael Starr from Steel Panther trusted with Redemption, a track that focused on wild glam metal form, fit the image of Steel Panther. Veteran singer Jeff Scott Soto is in the spiritful AOR track of Summer Days. Finally there at least an European feel in Dreamkeeper, where Evergrey singer Tom S. Englund delivered it epic-ly!What a great packed of quality materials in one album. Of all tracks not only Gus G able to fit the styles of his song to the respected guess, he also seem like outdone the guess' each band. For example in Tom Englund's track, we can feel Evergrey's music in it. There are enough punches on each song, added more  replay value to the album. Interestingly, Gus G decided to not gives any clue about his music from Firewind. A good choices, meaning his creativity in the area of power metal will still dedicated to the main band. I Am the Fire is a great album with fresh ideas stretching  from modern metal to oldies glam metal. A must have." - Metal Harem
    $12.00
  • New edition comes with a bonus DVD filled with videos and documentaries. Same price as before!!Amaranthe are a new Swedish/Danish band signed to Spinefarm. The band is fronted by Elize, who you will know from her touring with Kamelot. To say Elize is hot is an understatement. The band don't take the expected gothic metal route. Their order of business is a mix of poppy-melodic metal laced with death metal. Curiously the band features three vocalists. Elize is front and center but she shares the spotlight with the death growls of Dreamland's Jake E and the clean vocals of Andy Solvestrom. At times there is a similarity to some of Delain's poppier tunes but the death growls add a heavier aspect. There was a buzz developing on this disc before it hit here - I have to say I was quite surprised.
    $12.00
  • We don't typically stock CDs by unknown solo artists but when I saw all the musicians involved I realized this wasn't a typical album!  American guitarist Jeff Green has collaborated with a number of musicians entrenched in the British prog scene and come up with a nice symphonic rock album that deserves your attention.  Nice Yes vibe!"In 2011 the American born musician Jeff Green, who lives in Ireland, recorded his first solo album Jessica (see review). The album contained a sad but true story dealing with the death of his daughter and the awareness of stillbirth. During the interview I had, I asked him about his future plans (see interview). Green told me that he was working on a second album called Elder Creek which should be released in the spring of 2012. Moreover, he said that this would be a prog project dealing with the subject of memory, and how memory or loss of memory makes us who we are. The musicians on this record would be the same as the ones who played on Jessica. Well, apparently the recordings of this album took more time since its release was only early 2014.Elder Creek isn't released as Green's second solo album, but as the Jeff Green Project. While listening to the album I realized why he had called it a project, because it definitely sounds as a band effort. Apart from Jeff Green (lead and rhythm electric guitars, six and twelve-string acoustic guitars, mandolin, guitar synthesizer, lead and backing vocals, programming) crucial roles are for Mike Stobbie (keyboards, ex-Pallas), Pete Riley (drums, Guthrie Govan, Wetton & Downes, Icon, Keith Emerson), Andy Staples (bass), Garreth Hicklin (lead and backing vocals, Illegal Eagles) and Imogen Hendricks (lead and backing vocals). Several guest musicians have minor parts, but strangely enough these parts are just as important because their contributions are really significant on certain tracks. These musicians are Phil Hilborne (Keith Emerson, Brian May, Glen Hughes, Steve Vai), who plays some guitar solos, Alan Reed (ex-Pallas, lead vocals on A Long Time From No) and Sean Filkins (ex-Big Big Train, lead vocals on Elder Creek).As Green already explained in the interview Elder Creek indeed explores the concept of memory, amnesia and the part it plays in our personal lives in particular and in society in general. Using both anecdotal and mythological subjects, the album evokes the question: if memories define who we are, then who are we without them? Many lyrics were based on poems written by Jeff's father. In a way this was very important because his grandmother, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, was the inspiration for the concept of this record. He was very close to her and she always believed in his musical aspirations and talents.The music written for this personal concept is a wet dream for all devotees of prog and neo-prog rock. From the beginning until the end I got carried away on a musical roller coaster that blew me out of my chair. Especially Jeff's collaboration with keyboardist Mike Stobbie makes Elder Creek an amazing album. The synergy between both musicians can be heard throughout. Green excels on guitar and mandolin by playing strong riffs and outstanding solos; Stobbie just knows how to play an excellent solo on his MiniMoog and how to create an atmosphere with his keyboards by playing impressive parts on the Mellotron, amongst others. Of course, this doesn't mean that all the other contributors didn't do their job properly. Certainly not; all of them succeeded in putting everything in the right place to create seven superb sounding songs.These seven songs do not always sound originally. But hey, which band is still original nowadays? I guess none! So I don't see a problem here; what really matters is the music and this grabbed me by the throat. So I don't care at all that the MiniMoog sometimes sounds as if it was played by Rick Wakeman (ex-Yes) or Rob Reed (Magenta, Kompendium), and I don't mind that the guitar occasionally sounds like the way Steve Howe (Yes) plays the guitar or Joe Walsh (The Eagles). Well, by the way, sounding like Joe Walsh isn't that strange because Jeff Green was and still is a member of the tribute band Illegal Eagles. I also heard influences from Yes, especially from Close To The Edge (1972) and Drama (1980), and from Keith Emerson on the epic piece A Long Time From Now, which in my opinion belongs to the highlights of this CD.Not only the music of Elder Creek has been worked out well; this also applies to the booklet. All tracks are visualized with photos and paintings; all lyrics have been included as well as the line-up per track. A detailed explanation of the concept of this great album is given by Tom and Jeff Green. Jeff can be seen on one of the pictures in the booklet surrounded by albums recorded by Pink Floyd, The Who, Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles, although hardly any influences of these artists can be heard on the album.I kept playing Elder Creek over and over again. I just couldn't get enough of the wonderful music. I love it so much that I can only give the highest possible rating of five stars. In my opinion this is a true masterpiece that deals with a delicate subject, but performed in a pleasant way. It's highly recommended to people who enjoy acts such as Yes, Magenta, Rick Wakeman and Keith Emerson. As far as I'm concerned this is one of the best albums I've heard in 2014! " - Background Magazine
    $16.00
  • Complete 2 hour performance from the band's show at The Catalyst in Santa Cruz, California. As you know Andy Latimer has been battling cancer for some years (he seems to be fighting his way back to good health) so this is billed as a farewell performance of sorts.
    $22.00
  • Supreme krautrock mindblower featuring the German composer/keyboardist Eberhard Schoener on Moog, Sigi Schwab on guitar, Pete York on drums combined with a Balinese orchestra. German space rock meets gamelan! Comes with a DVD of a German TV documentary from 1975 filmed in Bali. WOW!!!
    $16.00
  • I could easily make this write up short and simple: Bad ass old school progressive rock served up by a bunch of Canadian virtuosos. Instead I'll elaborate a bit more. Druckfarben is a quintet based out of Toronto. They are fronted by Phil Naro who some of you may remember from his days with Billy Sheehan in Talas. With this prog rock venture he does his Jon Anderson best to fit in and he does perfectly (no hints of metal on this disc). Naro is the best known of the band but everyone playing on it obviously have a love for 70s prog rock and they have the chops to nail it down. This debut is an amalgam of all the good stuff - ELP, Yes, Kansas, Rush, and Gentle Giant all rolled into one. If you like your prog the way it used to be you have to hear this disc. Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • "This is above-par progressive rock fare with obvious stylistic similarities to progressive titans Dream Theater. That being said, Fughu concentrates on bursts of melodic development in between bouts of dizzying coordinated instrumentation for this album. This is a technical musician’s album, through and through, and all instruments are on display. Somewhere in this amalgamation is a sensibility distinctly Argentinean.This is more than the sum of its instrumental parts, with each instrumentalist taking the best of what he can do and melting it into a showy melting pot of songs. The songs don’t exactly cover new ground, as far as musical innovation goes, but they are damn good chunks of progressive rock. One notable thing about the record is the vocals of Santiago Burgi. With a forceful and full voice, as well as a range of expression befitting a Broadway musical singer, Burgi brings a show of his own to songs like “Dead End Start,” “Absence,” “Storm,” and the gentle “Solitude.” While the vocals shine through the album, the mix on “Absence” pushes the vocals back a bit behind the guitars and drums, which is unfortunate and should be remedied on future releases, as the lyrics are hard to discern when lots of instrumentation is present.Also of note are the piano and keyboard parts, lending the bulk of the melodic force on the album. Marcelo Malmierca’s talents make up the majority of the lead parts, as well as the guitar talents of Ariel Bellizio. If you appreciate soulful modern blues-metal guitar solos and rhythm guitar parts with the flair of a modern Yes, there’s much to like. The bass guitar lines of Juanma Lopez are also deceptively skillful and showy at times. The drum work reeks of Mike Portnoy’s style, but Ale Lopez’s percussive talents are undeniable and add the necessary backbone of the album. On the album’s longest track, “Pain_Craving_Broken_Stop,” the band fires on all cylinders and gives an all-star closer to the album, moving from a delicate piano beginning to an exciting two climaxes before and after the middle of the 10-minute song. Further, the instrumental sections are monstrous and take the album to its highest heights.This Argentinean brew has substantial musical counterpoints to the metal aspect of it, while maintaining a triumphant feel and complex musical heights. Fun and full of life, “Absence” is a fulfilling album you will keep coming back to time and again." - Metal Underground
    $13.00
  • Luxembourg is not exactly a hotbed for prog rock bands but they have at least one in TNNE.  The band was originally known as No Name but went through an upheaval in their lineup.  No named The No Name Experience, the band still features original keyboardiste Alex Rukavina and vocalist Patrick Kiefer.  These guys revel in the neo-prog sound.  If you are a Pendragon or IQ fan you will eat this stuff up!
    $15.00
  • Remastered edition with two bonus tracks."Journey's ninth new studio album found the group reduced to a trio of guitarist Neal Schon, singer Steve Perry, and keyboard player Jonathan Cain. But even without their regular rhythm section, the group was able to re-create the accessible pop/rock sound perfected on earlier albums such as Escape and Frontiers. Schon's guitar still cut through the fat keyboard chords, and Perry's fluid tenor still gave the songs an airy, melodic appeal. All of that was good for sales of two million copies and five chart singles, four of which made the Top 40 and one of which, "Be Good to Yourself," reached the Top Ten. That didn't match the seven-million-selling number one Escape, but it confirmed that Journey's music had a large audience right to the (temporary) end of its career." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • About six years ago guitarist Tony Vinci put together an excellent prog metal project under the Speaking To Stones moniker.  There was one main drawback - the drums were canned.  After a long silence, he's put together a new edition of the band and he's gotten a great drummer in the person of one Mark Zonder.  Andy Engberg handles the vocals and he does his usual superb job.  Keyboardist Anthony Brown adds a symphonic element (no pun intended).  The album consists of five long tracks - all very much guitar driven.  Vinci plays his ass off - this guy has the chops.  There are some neoclassical leanings to his playing at times but this is purely a prog album, very much in the Dream Theater mold.    2012 wasn't the greatest year for progressive metal but here at the tail end we get a stellar release.  Highly recommended.
    $14.00
  • "Periphery have been an omnipresent force in the prog metalcore realm since their first album released in 2010 – band founder Misha Mansoor has served as producer on several of the genre’s albums, and the other members are all famous in their own right, whether it’s simply for their craft (Matt Halpern), their involvement in other projects (Spencer Sotelo, Mark Holcomb, Nolly Getgood), or just simply being the nephew of someone exceedingly famous (Jake Bowen). This makes whatever they decide to do extremely important, and the band’s decision to release a concept double album has created hype of hugelargic proportions. In my humble opinion, the band has delivered on all fronts, but not without some disappointments in the “could’ve been” area.Since their inception, Periphery have changed from a chugga-chug ambidjent project posting demos on the internet in the late 2000s to a full-fledged prog metal band with heavy elements of metalcore, post-hardcore, and pop music in general. If you weren’t onboard for “Periphery II”, “Juggernaut” likely won’t change your mind (unless your issues were relatively small), as it’s more of the same poppy atmosphere and less of the techy downtuned riffs, though god knows THOSE are still around. But there’s also a lot of style experimentation – jazz fusion, death metal, and various forms of electronica are all utilized on a semi-normal basis, and range from being seamlessly integrated into the music to being tacked on to the ends of songs like gluing a top-rate dildo onto an already particularly throbby penis. If this all sounds a bit schizophrenic, rest assured that the songcraft is, for the most part, tighter than it’s ever been. Singles from Alpha like “22 Faces” and “Alpha” itself show off Periphery’s pop prowess with choruses and hooks that refuse to leave your head, and complex riffs that are somehow just as ‘wormy as the vocals. And the songs on Omega are longer, more complex, and still manage to be as infectious as the most annoying of STDs – even the twelve minute sprawling title track that has more in common with the bombastic riffs of Periphery I has a shapely middle section that rivals even the hottest of…ugh, fuck it, done with the metaphors. It’s just insane. I cried when I heard it.And now onto what I don’t care for; first off, the decision to split the album into two parts was definitely well-informed from a marketing standpoint. Most people don’t go around listening to 80 minute records all day, myself included, and the supposedly delicate structure of a concept album also means that listening to Juggernaut by skipping to different songs would devalue the experience. So the band broke it into two records to make it seem more manageable to listen to in daily life. Another stated reason was so that newcomers to the band would be able to buy Alpha at a discounted price, decide if they liked it, and then purchase Omega if they were so inclined (music previewing doesn’t work like that anymore, but hey you can’t fault the band for trying to turn that into tangible record sales). The problem I have is that Omega isn’t really paced to be its own album, which makes releasing it on its own instead as simply as the second disc in a package a little pointless. It’s not like the excellent “The Afterman” double albums from Coheed and Cambria, which were each albums that worked in their own right. I realize that this is really just semantics, but I think calling Juggernaut both the third and fourth album from Periphery, while technically correct, is just disingenuous, and judging them fairly on their own as separate albums is impossible (which is why all reviews being published are including them together).Periphery has always had a unique way of pacing their albums, regularly including playful, sometimes relatively lengthy interludes between tracks. Juggernaut is no different, and these interludes are now occasionally used to seed songs that will appear later on the album, or provide callbacks to tracks already present. The transitions aren’t always elegant however, and can range from grin-inducing to head-scratching to just plain grating. Thankfully, the band isn’t going for the illusion that each song flows seamlessly into the next, at least no more than they were going for it on any of their previous albums, and it’s easy to get used to everything given multiple listens.Overall, Juggernaut is a dense album that’s going to take a myriad of listens to fully sink in, just like most of the band’s prior releases (I don’t think anyone is gonna argue that “Clear” has any depth that you would find after about the fifth listen or so, but hey hey that’s ok kay). But it’s also accessible on the surface with deceptively simple rhythms and poppy choruses, which draw you in to appreciate the deeper cuts. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes unique and thoughtful music in the post-hardcore, metalcore, and progressive metal genres, but I’d also recommend it to anyone ever, because this is my absolute favorite band and I think they’ve created a masterpiece. So take from that what you will, and then get the fuck out of here. The play button is calling my name." - iprobablyhateyourband.com
    $11.00
  • Import special edition comes with:Download code for studio version of “Into The Sun”40-pages picture booklet"Imagine this - you're thrust into the metal world and, as a classical singer, it's pretty alien. But you do your job, sing your songs and the money comes in. And your name gets bigger. And the band become enormous and before you know it - you're literally singing for your supper. Your ultimate passion becomes your job. But is the world of metal really a place for a classical singer? Many thought that, once ousted by Nightwish, Tarja Turunen would soon return to her classical roots. Not quite. She began producing symphonic tinged material that, dare we say it, took the same path as the band that brought her success.The cynics are always going to be around, and I admit, I had the tendency to be one of them - Tarja is clearly only sticking with the guitars because it pays the bills, right? If it was up to her, she'd be singing 'Ave Maria' until the cows came home, right? Some of you stubborn lot will never shift from that point of view, no matter how many metal albums she releases, but it has become clearer than ever whilst listening to 'Colours In The Dark', that Tarja has found the beauty of orchestral metal just as captivating as Nightwish fans and her conviction is growing ever more powerful - if you don't believe it, check out the Romanticide-styled outro of 'Never Enough'. There's plenty more headbangs left in those raven locks - know that!'Victim Of Ritual' highlights the way Tarja commands a song vocally and suits it's position as opening track. The rolling 'R' in the title refrain and the silence she will inevitably conjure during live renditions of the accapella bridge stand to prove why she is such a beloved vocalist. Musically, the track deals in 'Phantom Agony'-era Epica, orchestra-lite and guitar heavy. It also has the most addictive refrains on the album, so it's position as single is proven correct. Likewise 'Never Enough' is instantly enjoyable - the chorus still sounds as vibrant and exciting as when it premiered. The real standout, surprisingly, is the Peter Gabriel cover though. 'Darkness' is not half as pop-ready as her take on 'Poison' and much more Tarja-friendly than 'Still Of The Night' - it shows just how successfully she can transform a cover and make it into her own. The thick strings and swooping instrumental wrap around her versatile vocals as Tarja switches between sinister and emotional at the drop of a hat.It can be a little taboo to mention the language problems, but the purity in which Tarja approaches her English lyrics is both a positive and a negative. Whilst there are the odd cringe-worthy blips throughout ('A conquest of fear, lonesomeness and dislike'), there is a richness to the lyrics of songs like '500 Letters' that simply tell a story, without killing it with too many pretence-laden metaphors. Tarja's infamous pronunciation also serves in her favour on the record - as minor as it may seem, her slightly peculiar delivery brings an unfamiliar flavour to the songs and possesses the ability to coat any banal lyrics with seductive and intriguing overtones just with a twist of a syllable.The record does have plenty of moments to excite you, as I mentioned, but it's not an entirely smooth ride. Too often, the songs feel a little lengthier than they should. I noted in my review of 'Never Enough' that the closing guitar riff went on for too long and a lot of the songs have a similiar fate. None of the tracks are skippable and every single one has it's merits, but it feels as if their strengths may be washed aside by a niggling thought in the back of your head, pondering whether you can bother to venture into a seven minute song for three minutes of beauty. 'Lucid Dreamer' is one such track that would have benefited from a little chopping. 'Mystique Voyage', too, could have seen a shorter track length further highlight the triumphant classical influence on the chorus.Though I exaggerate her operatic past, Tarja has spent most of her vocalist talent and career amongst metal music and it has really shown. What is both frustrating and rewarding, though, is that she is learning as much as the fans are. The music she has produced so far has been on a huge upward curve. The saccharine tendencies of 'My Winter Storm' pale in comparison to 'What Lies Beneath' and it's fantastic manipulation of orchestra, ambiance and metal. 'Colours In The Dark' comes as the next step up - slightly better than it's predecessor but, and this is where the frustration might set in, not quite as brilliant as you predict the next release will be. Editing the tracks a little more and emphasizing the true moments of beauty that linger within the songs is the next mission for team Tarja to take on.Watching an artist grow into the music that gave her the career she has  is not something you see everyday and Tarja is truly and deeply passionate, something many musicians don't retain after many years of the same old record-and-touring routine. She has eager ears and versatile lungs that want to explore. They want to learn and they want to become better. Listen to that aforementioned discography and you'll see how much Tarja has grown and become a force to be reckoned with in metal. 'Colours In The Dark' is nowhere near perfect but it's another chapter in the increasingly refined career of a woman that is, quite rightly, sticking her middle finger up at those who have written her off much too soon." - The Sonic Reverie
    $21.00