Everything Is Connected

SKU: 5060195515623
Label:
White Knight
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Third album from this very fine Irish neo-progressive band.  Dead Heroes Club have that traditional sound down.  Frontman Liam Campbell's voice has an uncanny resemblance to Fish and Peter Gabriel (which one depends on the tune).  This one is ripped right out of the Clutching At Straws playbook but the band tends to stretch out a bit more.  I also noticed that the guitar is cranked up a bit more than in the past.  Good stuff.

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  • Next to last album finds the band with a new lineup and a more commercial direction. Still some good stuff here.
    $18.00
  • Some of this sounds so much like Black Sabbath that I thought I was listening to a Count Raven album.  Latest album from this French doom metal band continues to mix in 70s prog moves as well as psychedelic folk.  A bit underproduced but that does lend a bit of charm.  Cool stuff!"It’s no secret that the French progressive doom band Northwinds is a favorite here at Vertical Chamber Apparatus as the band continually pushes themselves both creatively and compositionally. Despite their two-and-a-half decades of existence and a bulletproof discography the band still dwells in relative obscurity to the world at large. While the group is often and not necessarily unfairly labelled as a “doom metal band” that label is really only a fraction of the story. Northwinds definitely invokes the ancient rites of doom metal—mostly in an organic, proto-doom spirit—but they also voyage extensively into the realms of progressive rock, folk, psychedelia, and 70’s inspired hard rock thus taking the listener on phantasmagorical journeys into uncharted lands. With four outstanding releases already under their collective belts the band is poised to release their fifth full-length, the long-awaited and highly anticipated ‘Eternal Winter.’The band’s excellent 2012 album, ‘Winter,’ was initially conceived as a double album appropriately titled ‘Winter…Eternal Winter,’ but the idea was shelved by Black Widow Records as a risky venture. ‘Winter’ was a career defining moment for the band as the release seemed to capture them not only at their doomiest, but also at their most mystical. Based on the strength of ‘Winter’ it is exciting to know that most, if not all, of the material of ‘Eternal Winter’ was conceived and composed during the same writing cycles that have produced some of Northwinds’ strongest and darkest material to date.‘Eternal Winter’ is unquestionably an extension of ‘Winter,’ though the latest doesn’t quite descend into the same dark depths as its predecessor, nor does it establish the consistent magical atmosphere that was threaded throughout the previous album. These points should not be mistaken as criticism, but should be taken as mere observation as Northwinds has yet to disappoint and ‘Eternal Winter’ is no exception from that rule. While the magical atmospherics that were in abundance on ‘Winter’ are in slight decline on the band’s latest they definitely are not absent. The dreamy intro of “Chimeres” gives way to one of the most powerful tracks of the album. “Chimeres,” with its effective use of synths and ghostly sound effects, shares a stylistic and tonal kinship to other standout tracks from the band’s discography like “Black Tower” or “Winds of Sorrow.” Adding to the atmosphere of “Chimeres” is a sinister, phantom-like vocal effect that echoes the vocals of Sylvain Auvé—a subtle, yet effective detail that enriches the track as a whole.Where ‘Winter,’ for the most part, was steeped in darkness ‘Eternal Winter’ chooses to travel paths more related to progressive influenced hard rock. The flute heavy “Crossroads” has an epic, classic rock vibe that is fueled by majestic guitar solos, organ, and Auvé’s soulful vocals. The uncharacteristic “From the Cradle to the Grave,” one of the shortest non-instrumental songs written by the band, is dominated by a 70’s style strut that seemingly burns out almost as soon as it starts. “A Light for the Blind” may just be the best representation of Northwinds’ sound. It is a sprawling track that is embedded with moments of catchiness—particularly due to the lead guitar—juxtaposed with sonic explorations to other dimensions. It’s a great track that captures Northwinds doing what they do best—crafting intricate, often emotional tunes that never fail to keep the listener engaged.Northwinds have, impressively, continued their upward trajectory by releasing another stunner in a succession of stellar albums. The band is poised to have an incredible year with the upcoming release of ‘Eternal Winter’ hot on the heels of their killer split 7” with fellow countrymen Marble Chariot. In addition, the vinyl release of their 1995 demo courtesy of metalloscope-music has just been released. ‘Eternal Winter,’ like the rest of Northwinds’ discography, is an enchanting album that is comprised of a multitude of layers. Fans of doom metal and progressive rock will undoubtedly discover and hear a lot to admire in the music of Northwinds and ‘Eternal Winter’ is no exception. An engaging listen from start-to-finish. Highly recommended." - Vertical Chamber Apparatus
    $16.00
  • Trillium is the new project from Amanda Somerville. You may not be overtly familiar with her but you've heard her work. In addition to the Aina album, she has collaborated with Avantasia, Kamelot, and Epica among others. In fact she filled in for Simone Simons on one of Epica's US tours. In addition to being a songwriter she is a prominent vocal coach.Trillium is a collaboration with Sander Gommans (ex-After Forever) and noted metal producer/musician Sascha Paeth. Musicians from the Paeth universe are featured through out. Most notable are duets with Jorn Lande (!) and Matt Sinner. The music is an amalgam of hard rock, symphonic metal, and perhaps even a smidgen of gothic metal. Ms. Somerville is a great singer and is adaptable to all the styles she presents. Shockingly good!
    $7.00
  • " A careful look at the back catalogue of the power/progressive (early), power/thrash (later) metal outfit Tad Morose from Bollnäs, Sweden, will reveal an interesting pattern. The activity of the band is divided into two distinct periods sharing a common attribute, the notable improvement with each subsequent full-length release per period. During the ‘90s, the band became known within the power/progressive metal circuit with the release of three albums. The third one, 1997’s A Mended Rhyme saw the band shifting from the keyboard driven melody of the two previous albums (especially Sender of Thoughts) to a much more engaging balance between the said sound and a more upbeat, aggressive take on power metal.Unfortunately, a 5-year period of silence followed the release of Mended Rhyme and halted the further refinement of that album in future endeavors, as it was difficult for the band to ink a new record deal. Most fortunately however, Century Media Records decided to sign the band in 1998 and with a second guitar replacing the keyboards, Tad Morose became a straight-up power metal outfit. During the period 2001-2003, the band recorded three albums, whose merit ranked between “great” and “monumental”. Modus Vivendi (2003) in particular, lies among the best power/thrash metal albums ever recorded, but some times a near-perfect album can be a blessing as much as it can become a curse. Urban Breed decided to leave the band in 2006, and scheduled recording sessions for a new album were suspended. After several line-up changes and with real life issues constantly getting in the way, Tad Morose joined forces with newly founded Swedish label Despotz Records and a new album entitled Revenant was released, an album signifying the start of a prosperous era for the band.As expected, the new Tad Morose album extends the band’s power/thrash metal storytelling, right from where Modus Vivendi had concluded. The first strategic move in the said respect on behalf of the band, is no other than the recruitment of vocalist Ronny Hemlin, a musician known to Tad Morose from the second album of Inmoria (a band which features ex and current Tad Morose members). Hemlin is in charge of a powerful, clean voice with an impeccable vibrato, in the vein of Tim “Ripper” Owens. The said attributes are ideal for the narration of the album’s ominous lyrical content and the adaptation to the devastating choruses of songs such as “Beneath a Veil of Crying Souls” and “Within a Dream”. The rest of the band does not fall short either. The trademark “Bollnäs power/thrash metal” sound is (more than) convincingly reproduced, although it feels darker than in before (check the “goth” keyboards in the album’s rear). Moreover, Tad Morose have included elements from Swedish power/doom metal and outfits such as Memory Garden (for example in the song “Ares”), whereas they appear to dig Painkiller-era Judas Priest all too much (for instance, check “Death Embrace”), as the shell of several songs is decorated accordingly.Despite the album’s great merit, certain pitfalls seem to have not been avoided. First of all, the sound production, although it’s clean and powerful in principle, it fails to conceal its digital origin, and ends up detracting power, primarily from the rhythm section and (at a much lesser but perceivable extent) the rhythm guitars. Whereas the album would be much better off with 8 or 9 songs, several numbers from the existing track list, could use a more careful proofreading in more respects than one. For example, the Painkiller-era Judas Priest elements (especially the mid-tempo, double bass “power metal” segments) are used carelessly and greedily, while then main lead guitar melodies per song are adequate, but rather passable overall. Moreover, the rhythm section patterns are going through their motions from a point further, especially in the Judas Priest song segments.With Revenant, Tad Morose have started climbing again that very mountain, whose summit they had conquered with Modus Vivendi. Despite the long period of inactivity and the adverse line-up fluctuations, it seems that the band’s ascension process has started from a much better current status than the corresponding one during the dusk of the ‘90s. As the band has implied in interviews about Revenant, the aforementioned shortcomings have come as a result of the long period of hiatus and the sudden urgency to conclude work for it, while coping with various deadlines. Looking at their current state of play, the only way for Tad Morose is to raise the stakes and go up. They can do it, they’ve been here before." - Sputnik Music
    $13.00
  • "With 1985's Metal Heart, German metal institution Accept attempted to add catchier choruses and melodies to their high-octane guitar riffing in a clear ploy to crack the American market. Not that this move in any way upset the balance of their thus-far smooth-running metal machine, which had been gaining momentum with every release since the start of the decade. No, Metal Heart was certainly a step toward accessibility, but a cautious one at that -- and, frankly, there was no toning down when it came to the lacerated larynx of gifted lead screamer Udo Dirkschneider. You gotta hand it to Accept, they sure knew how to make an entrance by now, and the apocalyptic title track is about as dramatic as it gets (the operatic "Bound to Fail" comes close), with guitarist Wolf Hoffman taking the helm on a long, mid-song solo excursion containing equal nods to Beethoven (very nice) and Edward Van Halen (get real). First single "Midnight Mover" is next, and along with the even more melodic "Screaming for a Love-Bite," it places obvious emphasis on hooks and melodies (and proved to be the toughest to stomach for the band's more hardcore fans). But despite another strange detour into jazz territory with the bizarre "Teach Us to Survive," Accept still packed amazing power, heaping on their Teutonic background vocals for the ultraheavy "Dogs on Leads" and gleefully pile-driving their way through relentless moshers like "Up to the Limit" and "Wrong Is Right." The brilliantly over-the-top "Too High to Get It Right" finds Dirkschneider screeching like never before, and to cap things off, the band really cooks on "Living for Tonight" -- arguably the best track all around. A winning set." - Allmusic Guide
    $5.00
  • This is the original US CD pressing on MCA Records.  
    $5.00
  • This is without question the most "prog" album The End has released on their label. Unexpect are a unique 7 piece ensemble from Quebec. It's somewhat hard to dissect this avant metal band but the closet comparison I can come up with is Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. Musicianship is insane - be it guitar, violin, keys, drums, or 9-string bass. The vocals are a predominantly clean mix of dual male/female harmonizing. It can be a cacophonous mix of shifting meters and then gorgeous melodies - all with the space of 30 seconds. A real grower of an album that really grabs your attention. Highly recommended.
    $10.00
  • New album clocks in near 80 minutes. No insanely long epics and the album is probably all the better for it. About as proggy as these guys have ever gotten.
    $9.00
  • Mega-rare US late 60's flower power psych/pop band with some subtle prog tendencies. Features lots of unreleased versions.
    $24.00
  • New authorized edition of one of the great UK organ rippers. Fuzzy Duck had roots in Five Day Week Straw People, Andromeda, and Atomic Rooster. This one falls into that "proto-prog" category. Its from 1971 and pre-synthesizer. The music has a great balance of organ/guitar interactions with Roy Sharland's organ really dominating. Sort of a cross between The Nice and Human Beast. This Esoteric edition features the 4 non-lp singles tracks as well as Mark Powell's usual excellent essay chronicling the band's brief history.
    $17.00
  • A tremendous album where they mix the avant-garde stuff in a bit with the tunes and it really works! Don't let this description drive you off. This is a powerful fusion band. Just one with a fervent imagination. I know several people that hate that squeaky stuff but love the tune Evaporazione from this disc. Fusion with accessible avant-guarde moments.-Rick Eddy
    $15.00
  • "The UK progressive synth group known as Zoltan have been turning heads since arising in 2010 as one of the most interesting projects signed to a then-fledgling Austrian label by the name of Cineploit Records.Fast forwarding four years later, both Zoltan and Cineploit are hitting a creative stride in their partnership, as the Sixty Minute Zoom LP will strongly attest. This sophomore effort from Zoltan follows up an EP for famed British doom label Rise Above-an audio take on director Amando De Ossorio's classic Blind Dead series of horror films-as well as a Cineploit-released tribute to John Cameron's score to the equally iconic Seventies film Psychomania, while at the same time leaving nearly every prior release from the band in the proverbial dust, so epically addictive and immensely blissful is this sound.Sixty Minute Zoom takes the building blocks of influence carved from the likes of film composer Fabio Frizzi, Italian prog giants Goblin and Pittsburgh duo Zombi and erects here a monument to their own creativity and unique compositional eye. Indeed, every aspect of Sixty Minute Zoom sounds more focused, confident and actualized as keyboardist Andy Thompson, bassist/keyboardist/guitarist Matt Thompson and drummer Andrew Prestidge lock into each others' musical strengths and unleash what is most certainly the defining Zoltan release up until this point in the band's career.Highlight tracks such as "The Ossuary" pulse with a malevolent bass drone and swirling, atmospheric synth, while the album's epic, twenty minute closer "The Integral" moves effortlessly between horrifically mood-setting soundscapes and low key electronic experimentation, anchored by an absolutely amazing drum performance from Prestidge. The drummer's lock-tight groove at the thirteen minute mark through the track's sizzling finish is bested perhaps only by the subtly powerful groove Prestidge hits upon as the Thompson's growling synth stabs lift the opening movements of "The Integral" as the best soundtrack theme never featured for an Italian horror or giallo film.No hyperbole or exaggeration here: Sixty Minute Zoom demands immediate attention from electronic music fiends and Eurocult soundtrack buffs the world over, as it bucks the late year trend as one of the finest albums of 2014." - The Examiner
    $18.00
  • Upstart Finnish label Svart Records has undergone a licensing program with the legendary Love Records label for an ongoing series of vinyl releases.  Many prog reissues are on the horizon.Tabula Rasa cut two albums for Love and this is their second.  Strong Camel influence - guitarist Heikki Silvernnoinen sounds quite a bit like Andy Latimer in tone. The use of electric piano, string synthesizer reminds me of Mirage.  While it doesn't quite hit the heights of their debut its a very nice slice of mainstream prog.This is a limited edition of 300 copies on black vinyl.
    $28.00
  • First time on CD! Early MPS session for this great keyboardist who is still going strong. Recorded in 1967, it reads like a who's who of krautrock and fusion. Members of the septet include Jean-Luc Ponty (violin), Gerd Dudek (tenor sax, clarinet), Eberhard Weber (cello), Jurgen Karg (bass), Mani Neumeier (drums), and Fred Braceful (drums). Frankly I was expected a wild free set and actually it's not too crazy at all. The music actually swings in spots. Gorgeous reissue arrives in a mini-LP sleeve with detailed liner notes and photos as well as 24 bit mastering.
    $21.00