Fate Of A Dreamer (2CD Digipak)

Atmospheric and mysterious. Those were the key words that Arjen Anthony Lucassen had in mind when he started his ambient rock project Ambeon back in 2001. For this, the multi-instrumentalist started a co-operation with singer Astrid van der Veen, a 14 year old super talent that Lucassen had discovered shortly before, and the later Within Temptation drummer Stephen van Haestregt. Ten years after the first release, Ambeon’s only album Fate of a Dreamer is now being released as a digipack with remastered original recordings, some single-edits/remixes and an extra track. The big surprise is a bonus-cd with acoustic versions of various Ambeon songs and many Ayreon classics, which has been Lucassen's flag ship for almost two decades.

DeLuxe 2CD Set in Digipack, Original Album, Extensive Booklet,
27 Remastered Tracks = 10 tracks Original Album + 17 Bonus Tracks,
over 115 minutes of music.
Liner notes by Arjen Lucassen.

Track listing

TMD-070 AMBEON – Fate Of A Dreamer: The Album – The Unplugged Recordings

CHAPTER 1: THE ALBUM
1. Estranged 2:51
2. Ashes 5:29
3. High 4:15
4. Cold Metal 6:50
5. Fate 7:45
6. Sick Ceremony 3:44
7. Lost Message 4:33
8. Surreal 4:38
9. Sweet Little Brother 6:08
10. Dreamer 5:17

Bonus Tracks
11. Cold Metal 3:48 – Single Version
12. Merry-Go-Round 4:45
13. High 3:29 – Remix

CHAPTER 2: THE UNPLUGGED RECORDINGS
1. Actual Fantasy 1:25
2. Valley of the Queens 2:39
3. Ashes 3:15
4. Charm of the Seer 3:29
5. Castle Hall 4:33
6. Estranged 2:49
7. Temple of the Cat 3:32
8. Isis and Osiris 6:09
9. High 3:43
10. Garden of Emotions 4:31
11. Sick Ceremony 3:02
12. House on Mars 5:22
13. Lost Message 3:42
14. Into the Black Hole / Cold Metal 5:10

REMASTERED IN THE 24-BIT DOMAIN FROM THE ORIGINAL MASTERS

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