Gentle Stream

SKU: SUBL085CD
Label:
Subliminal Sounds
Category:
Psychedelic
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Beautiful laid back psychedelic offering from this Swedish supergroup. Members include Reine Fiske (Landberk/Dungen), Johan Holmegard (Dungen), Christoffer Gunrup and Moussa Fadera. The music has a distinct 70s west coast vibe. It all has a gauzy lysergic haze over the sound but Reine's burning solos and the Mellotron remind us of the band's true roots. This one is like a wonderful dream you are trapped in and never want to wake up from. US edition with one bonus track.  Highly recommended.

"With a name like The Amazing, a certain standard is already expected; just as well the Swedish ‘supergroup’ don’t disappoint. Gentle Stream, the band’s sophomore efforts (2010’s Wait For a Light To Come was a ‘mini album’) is only eight tracks long, but totals in at a prolific forty-five minutes, and sees Reine Fiske et al pull together to create an alluring sound, one which has already gained the comparisons of Pink Floyd and Nick Drake.

Title-track ‘Gentle Stream’ opens the album, with somber strumming of the guitars, which is indeed reminiscent of David Gilmour, and the dreamlike vocals of Christoffer Gunrup. The opening of ‘The Fog’ would be perfectly at home on a track like Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘Dangling Conversation’, that is until the heavier plucking of Fiske comes into play, combined with melodic chiming, it gives the track that neo-psych feel the band are known for. Gunrup’s vocals are as beautiful as ever on this track, and sound so relaxed and calm that you don’t even realise "bring the bastards down" is a regular line. It’s things like this that elevate the album from being blithe and casual, which is how it seems on first listen. Of course, this isn’t a bad thing, and the whole album is simply exquisite to listen to, but the juxtaposition of such de-stressing music with slightly potentially darker lyrics is a strange, yet good one.

‘Dogs’ is a contender with ‘The Fog’ for best track on the album. It would be silly to deny the likeness to Pink Floyd when the beginning of this track launches, but again, those vocals make the song completely their own. The percussion (from Johan Holmegard) is particularly strong here, and truly lifts the song and helps it come to life.

Thankfully for them, and luckily for us, The Amazing live up to their name, having put together a harmonious and elegant album; excellently produced and beautifully orchestrated." - The 405

Product Review

Thu, 2012-01-26 10:48
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Very nice stuff!
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Product Review

Thu, 2012-01-26 10:48
Rate: 
0
Very nice stuff!
You must login or register to post reviews.
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