Glorious Collision (Ltd Edition)

SKU: SMH-CD-308760
Label:
SPV/Steamhammer
Category:
Power Metal
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Limited edition digipak of the new Evergrey album includes 2 booklets and one bonus track.

"Reformed and rejuvenated may best describe Evergrey 2.0 and their eighth studio album Glorious Collision After dissolving the band in the Spring of 2010, founder, guitarist, and vocalist Tom Englund immediately began recreating Evergrey, writing several songs with remaining keyboard player Rikard Zander. Englund then filled out the band with the incoming talent of Marcus Jidell (guitar), Hannes Van Dahl (drums) and Johan Niemann (bass).

A cursory listen to Glorious Collision finds Evergrey revitalized and seeming to draw from a well of new sources. In the past, both lyrically and musically, Englund/Evergrey was almost uniformly heavy, bleak, and often discomforting. I don't think Englund has lost any of his somber, near depressive, edge, but musically Glorious Collision certainly has a more lively feel to it. Leave It Behind, You, and It Comes From Within find Evergrey drawing on a more classic melodic rock feel wrapped in pure heavy metal. Wrong brings back some of Evergrey/Englund's melancholy while sounding like a Swedish version of current, and commercial, modern hard rock. Others, like Frozen, thunder along with a well-paced and invigorating melodic power metal style. Generally, with the depth and variety of the arrangements, Evergrey hasn't lost it's progressive edge either. But I'm not ready to call this work pure progressive metal. Ultimately, when listening to Wrong, I'm Drowning Alone, or the wonderful To Fit the Mold, Glorious Collision has a sweeping near epic quality to it thanks to the aforementioned melodic rock character wrapped in some serious heavy metal.

If Glorious Collision is the future of a re-emergent and revitalized Evergrey, then we are in for some grand days ahead. Glorious Collision is impressive: heavy, melodic, thick with groove, and quite entertaining. Maybe more bands should reboot." - dangerdog.com

Product Review

[email protected]
Sat, 2011-02-26 19:06
Rate: 
0
Has anybody been listening to this?? Gotta say, I've been following these guys since ISOT and granted the last couple releases have been - huh? But this release has a return to that Evergrey emotion that haunts with that driving power we love. Check it out!
[email protected]
Tue, 2011-03-22 19:58
Rate: 
0
I have to say this sounds like the most radio friendly one in the bunch. I had to push to find some moments I liked
[email protected]
Thu, 2011-03-24 13:01
Rate: 
0
Much better than I had expected. Torn was weak, to me even worse than MMA (which I really didn't think was that bad as everyone says). But this new one is worth checking out if you had lost faith in this band. Not as good as their first 4 releases, but surprisingly refreshing.
[email protected]
Tue, 2011-06-07 16:20
Rate: 
0
It's so sad to admit that the magic is gone!It's a better album that TORN,but still weak compared to the first ones!I am dissapointed!Too many slow songs and nothing surprising!Such a shame!
[email protected]
Fri, 2011-06-17 00:36
Rate: 
0
Ummmmm - quite frankly, I found this boring. Same with MMA and Torn. The aggression that I so loved in S,D,T, ISOT, Recreation Day and even Inner Circle is simply not here. In fact, it's been gone for a while. Still hoping for more of a return to original form.
You must login or register to post reviews.

Product Review

[email protected]
Sat, 2011-02-26 19:06
Rate: 
0
Has anybody been listening to this?? Gotta say, I've been following these guys since ISOT and granted the last couple releases have been - huh? But this release has a return to that Evergrey emotion that haunts with that driving power we love. Check it out!
[email protected]
Tue, 2011-03-22 19:58
Rate: 
0
I have to say this sounds like the most radio friendly one in the bunch. I had to push to find some moments I liked
[email protected]
Thu, 2011-03-24 13:01
Rate: 
0
Much better than I had expected. Torn was weak, to me even worse than MMA (which I really didn't think was that bad as everyone says). But this new one is worth checking out if you had lost faith in this band. Not as good as their first 4 releases, but surprisingly refreshing.
[email protected]
Tue, 2011-06-07 16:20
Rate: 
0
It's so sad to admit that the magic is gone!It's a better album that TORN,but still weak compared to the first ones!I am dissapointed!Too many slow songs and nothing surprising!Such a shame!
[email protected]
Fri, 2011-06-17 00:36
Rate: 
0
Ummmmm - quite frankly, I found this boring. Same with MMA and Torn. The aggression that I so loved in S,D,T, ISOT, Recreation Day and even Inner Circle is simply not here. In fact, it's been gone for a while. Still hoping for more of a return to original form.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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