Högtid

SKU: TRANS127
Label:
Transubstans Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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When the vinyl came in I proclaimed this as one of the frontrunners for album of the year and nothing has changed since.  Stunning album.

Agusa is an instrumental quartet from Sweden.  The band is derived from members of Sveriges Kommuner & Landsting, Kama Loka and Hoofoot.  This is a VERY retro sounding album that will appeal to fans of Kebnekajse, Pink Floyd, and perhaps even Anglagard.  No symphonic elements - just straight up organ, guitar, bass, and drums ripping it up over four long tracks.  Very dynamic sounds going on - shimmering echoey guitar leads that will remind you of Kenny Håkanson or Achim Reichel battling it out with undercurrents of organ that erupt into solos.  Overarching the music is a mystical psychedelic vibe - like this whole thing was cooked up in an Arab hashish den.  BUY OR DIE!!

Product Review

Thu, 2014-07-17 14:43
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Agusa is a new band emerging from Malmö, Sweden; and this first album literally floored me. The band’s line-up at the time they recorded Hogtid was: Tobias Pettersson (bass), Mikael Ödesjö (guitar), Dag Strömkvist (drums) and Jonas Berge (Hammond Organ). Their Facebook page indicates since the recording, they have a new drummer, Tim Wallander. Agusa’s music is most certainly what many would describe as Prog Rock, but there is no denying the psychedelic influences, with obvious leanings toward such diverse acts as Kebnekajse (Sweden), Amon Düül II (Germany) and Colosseum (UK), but at the same time presenting something unique. The album is almost entirely instrumental except for one track and will take you back to Sweden in about 1975! Hogtid features five compositions, a total of 44 minutes of music and strangely it has a distinct Scandinavian feel to it. I say strange because you wouldn’t expect to hear that in instrumental music, but there is a certain feel to the way the music is played and the instruments used. Keyboards listed show only the Hammond Organ which provides the band a very distinct flavor. The songs are mostly instrumental and mostly on the longish side; anywhere from seven to fourteen minutes in fact. Each song consists of a number of core melodic themes that are run through and then either dispensed with or returned to after some experimental, spacey, droning musical excursions. There are plenty of long rambling musical excursions where each member has the opportunity to display their craft. Nothing here is overly angular; in fact it’s all quite musically melodic. So while the structure and arrangements are drawn from the Prog world, much of the guitar and organ soloing tends to reflect the genre’s earlier psych origins. Together it fits very well. Some might call this Retro-Prog because of its late sixties vibe, others may call it Krautrock because of the spacey extended solos, but whatever label you want to put on it, it’s well-played and certainly interesting to listen to. Agusa have a good thing going here and prog fans would do well to check them out. The music on Hogtid is a nice blend of psychedelic influences and progressive rock that would make a great addition to your prog CD or vinyl collection (I liked the album so very much that I bought both, vinyl and CD). Authentic 70's progressive tunes that lived through four decades can be heard on this amazing album!
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Product Review

Thu, 2014-07-17 14:43
Rate: 
0
Agusa is a new band emerging from Malmö, Sweden; and this first album literally floored me. The band’s line-up at the time they recorded Hogtid was: Tobias Pettersson (bass), Mikael Ödesjö (guitar), Dag Strömkvist (drums) and Jonas Berge (Hammond Organ). Their Facebook page indicates since the recording, they have a new drummer, Tim Wallander. Agusa’s music is most certainly what many would describe as Prog Rock, but there is no denying the psychedelic influences, with obvious leanings toward such diverse acts as Kebnekajse (Sweden), Amon Düül II (Germany) and Colosseum (UK), but at the same time presenting something unique. The album is almost entirely instrumental except for one track and will take you back to Sweden in about 1975! Hogtid features five compositions, a total of 44 minutes of music and strangely it has a distinct Scandinavian feel to it. I say strange because you wouldn’t expect to hear that in instrumental music, but there is a certain feel to the way the music is played and the instruments used. Keyboards listed show only the Hammond Organ which provides the band a very distinct flavor. The songs are mostly instrumental and mostly on the longish side; anywhere from seven to fourteen minutes in fact. Each song consists of a number of core melodic themes that are run through and then either dispensed with or returned to after some experimental, spacey, droning musical excursions. There are plenty of long rambling musical excursions where each member has the opportunity to display their craft. Nothing here is overly angular; in fact it’s all quite musically melodic. So while the structure and arrangements are drawn from the Prog world, much of the guitar and organ soloing tends to reflect the genre’s earlier psych origins. Together it fits very well. Some might call this Retro-Prog because of its late sixties vibe, others may call it Krautrock because of the spacey extended solos, but whatever label you want to put on it, it’s well-played and certainly interesting to listen to. Agusa have a good thing going here and prog fans would do well to check them out. The music on Hogtid is a nice blend of psychedelic influences and progressive rock that would make a great addition to your prog CD or vinyl collection (I liked the album so very much that I bought both, vinyl and CD). Authentic 70's progressive tunes that lived through four decades can be heard on this amazing album!
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