Hybrid Child

SKU: LE1057
Label:
The Laser's Edge
Category:
Progressive Rock
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District 97, is the only progressive rock band in the world to feature an American Idol finalist and a Chicago Symphony Orchestra virtuoso cellist.

The band was formed in the Fall of 2006 by drummer Jonathan Schang, keyboardist Rob Clearfield, bassist Patrick Mulcahy and guitarist Sam Krahn. The foursome from Chicago honed a no-holds barred style of Liquid Tension Experiment-inspired instrumental rock before deciding the right vocalist was needed to complement their sound; enter 2007 American Idol Top 10 Femal Finalist, Leslie Hunt. With a look, sound and stage presence comparable to a young Ann Wilson, Leslie's dynamic performances pushed the band into a new direction that forged a unique marriage between accessible, cathy vocal melodies and an adventurous instrumental prowess.

After attending a show and being highly impressed, Katinka Kleijn, cellist extraordinaire from the world renowned Chicago Symphony Orchestra joined the band. She was soon followed by one of Chicago's finest young guitarists, Jim Tashjian. With this new lineup of peerless musicianship in place, District 97 began wowing crowds and establishing a devoted fan base through packed shows at legendary Chicago venues such as House Of Blues, Schubas and Martyrs.

Hybrid Child balances a meticulous attention to detail and studio-craft with the visceral power of a rock band that is firing on all cylinders. Running the gamut from Meshuggah-inspired metal, the epic majesty of Yes, and the melodicism of The Beatles, Hybrid Child unveils District 97 as a true force to be reckoned with, and one that is poised to take the music world by storm. With fans ranging from high school students to world class musicians, this process is clearly well underway.

Product Review

Fri, 2010-08-27 15:20
Rate: 
0
Seriously good stuff on this debut. Reminds a bit of the Bruford band's "Gradually Going Tornado" period. Leslie Hunt is no Simone Simons or Annie Haslam but she does not need to be. This is great organic prog rock that is very original and satisfying. And the cello? The cello makes a ton of difference, adding an edge of menace to the rhythm guitars. I will be replaying this one for quite a while to come. Leyth
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Product Review

Fri, 2010-08-27 15:20
Rate: 
0
Seriously good stuff on this debut. Reminds a bit of the Bruford band's "Gradually Going Tornado" period. Leslie Hunt is no Simone Simons or Annie Haslam but she does not need to be. This is great organic prog rock that is very original and satisfying. And the cello? The cello makes a ton of difference, adding an edge of menace to the rhythm guitars. I will be replaying this one for quite a while to come. Leyth
You must login or register to post reviews.
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