The Lesser Key of Solomon

"These days, it is one thing just to be able to release an album given the current state of the music business. However, to release said band’s best material while trying to pin down a job, scrap together some funds, have a family, maintain a “normal life” and deal with record companies with a 2014 “business model” is a whole other thing all together.

Most bands know that the gold at the end of this rainbow, through all the hard work and creativity, is merely deeming albums a “labor of love” and hope and pray they get enough gigs to make it “worth it” even with vast monetary loss. So is the life of A Sound of Thunder – a snapshot of a hard working band that is both the current and future of this business. Blessed with immense talent upswing that garners a “legion of thunder” to quickly reach crowdsourcing campaign goals, it is actually hard to take any record company offers seriously. Whether or not the band made a pact with the seven princes of hell, “The Lesser Key of Solomon” is A Sound Of Thunder's best work to date and a sleeper album of the year that should not go unnoticed.

In stark contrast to “Time’s Arrow” (which listening back now almost sounds Cro-Magnon by comparison), “The Lesser Key of Solomon,” pushes the band in a much more progressive and mature direction over a bed of gleefully evil lyrical content. The style is a unique combination of progressive rock, 90’s W.A.S.P. and an overly obvious dose of eerie King Diamond. Oddly enough, when the Kickstarter edition of opening track “Udoroth” was issued to backers, it was a real stripped down pure metal song in the “Queen of Hell” vein and seemed way more basic metal than what the band has been releasing in recent years. However, when the completed album version hit my stereo it was as if it had been transformed. Choirs, sound clips, and added vocal parts have expanded it into way more than the simple barbaric nature of the pre-release.

With longer songs and higher levels of progression all around, “The Lesser Key of Solomon” presents the band's most complex material to date – with a foursome of tracks in “The Boy Who Could Fly,” “Elijah,” “Blood From the Mummy’s Tomb,” and “House of Bones” that stand up to any album released this year and back. “Elijah” is near 10 minutes with so many flowing parts it could really be divided into three separate and distinct tracks, but it is just so damn perfect linked together.

Guitarist Josh Schwartz has perfected his craft over the years and each album presents an ever growing talent. On “Lesser” there is more exploration with bluesy styles alongside the usual butchering riffs and soaring, engaging solos that have propelled him into one of the best out there. Sadly though, he is still under the radar of most of the world. Check out the guitar emoting on “Black Secrets” and “House of Bones.” Backed up by the monster rhythm section of drummer Chris Haren and bassist Jesse Keen, the musicianship is absurdly fantastic.

Vocalist Nina Osegueda has blossomed into one of the leading front women in the business today (and if you haven’t heard….shame on you). You won’t hear an operatic droning or any glitzy bubble gum pop metal infused vocals that are all the rage in Scandinavia these days. What you get is ass kicking, bold, face-punching power. On “Lesser,” Osegueda really expands her “softer side” (shown last on “Time’s Arrow” favorite “I’ll Walk With You”). Check out the performances on “One Empty Grave” and “Lesser” favorite “The Boy Who Can Fly,” with just the perfect amount of emotion to draw listeners into the same feeling. On top of all that, Nina has clearly re-stumbled upon the King Diamond back catalog, for she adds a huge dose of creepy “sing song-telling” in tracks like “Elijah” (check out 7:34-7:50 for example).

Armed with the knowledge that the next album is already nearly completed… I can’t even imagine where this talented U.S. act will take its musical direction. “The Lessor Key of Solomon” already represents the best material the band has released to date, which is exactly how I felt with “Time’s Arrow.” The constant drive to be better coupled with perfect execution makes "The Lesser Key Of Solomon" easily rank among the elite albums released in 2014. Skipping over this album would be a real disservice to truly inspiring and independent music." - Metal Underground

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  • "Live release from the British modern classic rock band. In 2014, Mostly Autumn released the highly acclaimed Dressed in Voices. They decided, after much consideration, that the concept album Dressed in Voices deserved to be played live in its entirety at every show. It proved to be the right decision and seemed to hold audiences spellbound, so much so that they were overwhelmed with requests for a live recording and here it is! Box of Tears - named after the final track on the album - is a live version of Dressed in Voices recorded during the band's 2014 tour. Winners of Best Live Concert and Best Female Vocalist 2014 in the Classic Rock Society awards, they have earned themselves a name for their outstanding live shows and have been described as 'the best band you have never heard'. The album really comes alive in a concert environment and the emotion shines through - you can hear a pin drop between songs as the audience becomes enthralled in the drama."
    $14.00
  • "Periphery have been an omnipresent force in the prog metalcore realm since their first album released in 2010 – band founder Misha Mansoor has served as producer on several of the genre’s albums, and the other members are all famous in their own right, whether it’s simply for their craft (Matt Halpern), their involvement in other projects (Spencer Sotelo, Mark Holcomb, Nolly Getgood), or just simply being the nephew of someone exceedingly famous (Jake Bowen). This makes whatever they decide to do extremely important, and the band’s decision to release a concept double album has created hype of hugelargic proportions. In my humble opinion, the band has delivered on all fronts, but not without some disappointments in the “could’ve been” area.Since their inception, Periphery have changed from a chugga-chug ambidjent project posting demos on the internet in the late 2000s to a full-fledged prog metal band with heavy elements of metalcore, post-hardcore, and pop music in general. If you weren’t onboard for “Periphery II”, “Juggernaut” likely won’t change your mind (unless your issues were relatively small), as it’s more of the same poppy atmosphere and less of the techy downtuned riffs, though god knows THOSE are still around. But there’s also a lot of style experimentation – jazz fusion, death metal, and various forms of electronica are all utilized on a semi-normal basis, and range from being seamlessly integrated into the music to being tacked on to the ends of songs like gluing a top-rate dildo onto an already particularly throbby penis. If this all sounds a bit schizophrenic, rest assured that the songcraft is, for the most part, tighter than it’s ever been. Singles from Alpha like “22 Faces” and “Alpha” itself show off Periphery’s pop prowess with choruses and hooks that refuse to leave your head, and complex riffs that are somehow just as ‘wormy as the vocals. And the songs on Omega are longer, more complex, and still manage to be as infectious as the most annoying of STDs – even the twelve minute sprawling title track that has more in common with the bombastic riffs of Periphery I has a shapely middle section that rivals even the hottest of…ugh, fuck it, done with the metaphors. It’s just insane. I cried when I heard it.And now onto what I don’t care for; first off, the decision to split the album into two parts was definitely well-informed from a marketing standpoint. Most people don’t go around listening to 80 minute records all day, myself included, and the supposedly delicate structure of a concept album also means that listening to Juggernaut by skipping to different songs would devalue the experience. So the band broke it into two records to make it seem more manageable to listen to in daily life. Another stated reason was so that newcomers to the band would be able to buy Alpha at a discounted price, decide if they liked it, and then purchase Omega if they were so inclined (music previewing doesn’t work like that anymore, but hey you can’t fault the band for trying to turn that into tangible record sales). The problem I have is that Omega isn’t really paced to be its own album, which makes releasing it on its own instead as simply as the second disc in a package a little pointless. It’s not like the excellent “The Afterman” double albums from Coheed and Cambria, which were each albums that worked in their own right. I realize that this is really just semantics, but I think calling Juggernaut both the third and fourth album from Periphery, while technically correct, is just disingenuous, and judging them fairly on their own as separate albums is impossible (which is why all reviews being published are including them together).Periphery has always had a unique way of pacing their albums, regularly including playful, sometimes relatively lengthy interludes between tracks. Juggernaut is no different, and these interludes are now occasionally used to seed songs that will appear later on the album, or provide callbacks to tracks already present. The transitions aren’t always elegant however, and can range from grin-inducing to head-scratching to just plain grating. Thankfully, the band isn’t going for the illusion that each song flows seamlessly into the next, at least no more than they were going for it on any of their previous albums, and it’s easy to get used to everything given multiple listens.Overall, Juggernaut is a dense album that’s going to take a myriad of listens to fully sink in, just like most of the band’s prior releases (I don’t think anyone is gonna argue that “Clear” has any depth that you would find after about the fifth listen or so, but hey hey that’s ok kay). But it’s also accessible on the surface with deceptively simple rhythms and poppy choruses, which draw you in to appreciate the deeper cuts. I’d recommend it to anyone who likes unique and thoughtful music in the post-hardcore, metalcore, and progressive metal genres, but I’d also recommend it to anyone ever, because this is my absolute favorite band and I think they’ve created a masterpiece. So take from that what you will, and then get the fuck out of here. The play button is calling my name." - iprobablyhateyourband.com
    $11.00
  • "Next is the third album by Journey and was released in 1977.Journey continued the formula from 1976's Look into the Future but this album also retains some of Journey's progressive rock style from the first album."
    $5.00
  • DGM has been cranking out albums for years and with all the lineup changes they go through, somehow the music gets better and better.  Forget that Russell Allen and Jorn Viggo Lofstad guest on the album - sure that's cool.  More important are the facts that vocalist Mark Basile is rock solid and the band has come up with a perfect blend of melodicism, heaviness and proginess. (not sure that is a word).  This one makes all the right moves. File under: AWESOME!   Highly recommended.
    $15.00
  • Justin Greaves continues to churn the lineup but the core sound of Crippled Black Phoenix remains the same.  Vocals are now helmed by Daniel Änghede and he's quite good.  Not sure why no one can hold down the fort at the microphone for more than one album but Greaves keeps finding quality voices.The sound of CBP is a modern twist on vintage Pink Floyd.  A mash up of post rock and old school prog rock.  No Mellotrons here but lots of splashes of organ at just the right time that will remind you of Richard Wright.  Contemporary but old all at the same time.  That's the enigma of Cripple Black Phoenix and what keeps me coming back for more, album after album.  Highly recommended.(Oh - apologies about the price.  The band is signed to Mascot Records, who for reasons unknown to either the band or their management, do not give CBP's albums a US release.  This is an expensive imported digipak)
    $21.00
  • ""RUSH: CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR" was filmed and recorded last November at the American Airlines Arena in Dallas, Texas, during Rush's highly successful Clockwork Angels Tour. The eleven month-marathon world tour crossed North America twice and ventured overseas to Europe in support of the band's acclaimed 2012 studio release "CLOCKWORK ANGELS."In capturing the tour's electrifying three hour set, "RUSH: CLOCKWORK ANGELS TOUR" pairs Rush classics ("Tom Sawyer," "The Spirit Of Radio," "2112"), with a nod to the 80's Rush era (The Analog Kid," "Territories," "Subdivisions") alongside newly reworked arrangements specifically for the tour featuring the Clockwork Angels String Ensemble ("Headlong Flight," "YYZ," "Red Sector A"). The string section marks the first time the trio has brought additional musicians on the road with them. To showcase their latest studio release, the epic set list also features nine tracks off "CLOCKWORK ANGELS." Other highlights include tracks rarely performed and never before recorded live ("The Body Electric," "Middletown Dreams"), in addition to three separate drum solos by the incomparable Neil Peart."
    $22.00
  • 1976's Straosfear clearly defined the band's heavily sequenced sound.  It was highly melodic - all the experimentalism of the early 70s was gone.  Dark and a bit intimidating, its one of their best.
    $10.00
  • "The name of the album is Les Contes du Singe Fou but all lyrics are sung in english. Maybe little despair for commercialism? Who knows. Anyways Clearlight is in my mind the best french-progressive band ever. While not alienating listeners with avant-garded obscurities theres still a fine progressive and true symphonic approach to music. Les Contes du Singe Fou is a science-fiction concept-album released in 1975 and it consists out of five numbers from which numbers 1 and 3 are divided into multiple parts. The first piece of music is "The Key" which is divided into 1)The Outsider which is an excellent build up with fine vocals. The Outsider flows nicely into part two: A Trip to the Orient. The last part is Lightsleeper's Despair which brings to mind A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers by Van Der Graaf Generator, especially the vocals are a little similar to Peter Hammills. After "The Key" comes Soliloque, a beatiful song which doesnt quite answer the hopes, The Key builded up before. Then there is a cosmic baroque inspired 1:50 long Prelude right in the middle of the album. The Prelude starts a three-part song called "Time Skater". Part two of Time Skater is called Count Down To Eternity. It has a melody that resembles far too much the flute-theme in Genesis's Suppers Ready but otherwise it's definetly musically the best part of the album. Cosmic Crusaders ends "Time Skater". It's an acoustic piano rollercoaster, a bit too stretched in length but still worthwhile to listen to. The album ends with two excellent pieces of music. Stargazer which again has vocals and then the worthy ender for the album Return to the Source, an excellent build-up song with all the instruments that were played through the album. You can hear that Clearlight put very much effort into making this album, but still something isn't right. Some pieces are a bit stretched in length and some pieces borrow ideas from other albums. The originality isn't the same as in Clearlight's first albums. Still this is a fine album." - ProgArchives
    $12.00
  • "Powermad Finns Battle Beast are back and, it has to be said, sounding better than ever. Unholy Savior is their third full-length effort and, after the disappointment of second album Battle Beast, the pressure was definitely on guitarist Anton Kabanen and company to deliver the goods here.They’ve certainly done that. Unholy Savior is a satisfyingly ‘complete’ sounding album, an album where all the bits of greatness the band has hinted at in the past find themselves being woven together with gratifyingly high impact.Personally I felt the big drawback of the last album was the vocal performance of Noora Louhimo, who I felt failed to adequately replace the first album’s vocalist Nitte Valo in terms of power and personality. Well, those misgivings have been firmly dismissed on Savior… OpeNing the album in a sultry fashion reminiscent of the Metal Queen Lee Aaron herself, Louhimo reaches top gear quickly unleashing a truly magnificent scream at the end of the title track which is nothing less than an affirmation that she’s finally arrived as this band’s rightful vocalist. It’s a magnificent performance, and she keep it up throughout the album.There’s more variety on this album, too. The band no longer seem to feel bound to put the pedal to the metal all the time, occasionally easing off the gas and giving rein to their eighties fantasies with predictably encouraging results. Sea of Dreams, despite it’s faux-Celtic Nightwishesque intro, actually sounds like something Roxette might have come up with (and that’s no bad thing in my book);  At least until the end of the song, that is, when Louhimo unleashes those formidable pipes again and hits the song right out of the park – absolutely spine tingling stuff!After that interlude, the explosion of metal that is Speed and Danger sounds even heavier than it probably is. The song sounds like the sort of thrashy metal Judas Priest were experimenting with around the time of Ram it Down, especially the frantic soloing of Kabanen who manges to sound like both Glenn Tipton and KK Downing in the space of about four bars – no mean feat! – The parping keyboard solo by Janne Bjorkroth adds a bit of light relief before he and Kabanen then attempt to out-Stratovarius Stratovarius in a deliriously over the top instrumental break. All heavy metal life is here!Touch in the Night has an even more ludicrously eighties intro, sounding like something Laura Branigan might have released, before easing into an easy Euro Pop groove where Noora is allowed to highlight the softer side of her vocal range. It’s cheesy as all hell, but somehow it works, and it’s here that the true value to the Battle Beast blueprint of Louhimo is revealed – Nitte Valo could never have sung this little gem.So there you have it – easily Battle Beast’s most appealing and enjoyable outing yet, though songs like Touch in the Night are sure to lose them some of their more hardcore metallic following;  Unholy Savior finds the band finally finding their true niche, and sounding all the more impressive for it. " - Metal As F**K
    $11.00
  • "The great dream of Fabio Zuffanti since he began writing the music on Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "The rime of the mariner ancoent" was to transpose the whole opera in a theatrical version, giving people a version that could visualize its magic words and music. Thanks to the meeting with genoese director Susanna Tagliapietra, author of the great achievements in the field of the musical with his versions of "Aida" and "Jesus Christ Superstar", the dream has become reality.Susanna has helped to bring alive the musical world of Zuffanti creating a multimedia work and reproducing on stage the supernatural universe of Coleridge with multimedia elements, dance and stage actions. The first of the show was held last December 16, 2012 in the prestigious Teatro Verdi in Genoa getting a great success.From that evening comes this double album, containing a DVD with the shooting of the show (and a funny backstage) and a CD with the audio recording of the evening. Compared to the studio version, published on CD last year, the theatrical version contains many new arrangements and a brand new piece ("Interlude")."
    $25.00
  • “Tempo”, long waited new Osanna release with a 40 pages book with lots of photos and 2 DVD. Prog lovers will be captured by this work full of great music with a recent concert at Trianon Theatre in Naples with orchestra and archives material with rare 70s video footage.The book shows many pictures which tell Osanna Story with some photos from the 1st Osanna line up (Elio D’Anna, Danilo Rustici, Massimo Guarino, Lello Brandi) and a biography of the band written in Italian and English. The 2 DVD tell the history of the band from the first RAI video clips ‘til the recent live plays in Naples in 2012.First DVD “Live in Naples” has realised at the Trianon Theatre in Naples on 24 October 2012 during the presentation of  “Rosso Rock” album; a concert with some guests as: David Jackson, Sophya Baccini, Maurizio Capone, Elio Eco, Giampiero Ingrassia, Gianni Leone, Antonella Morea, Tito Schipa Jr., la Banda “Concerto Musicale Speranza” di Pino Ciccarelli e l’Orchestra d’archi “Rosso Rock” Ensemble” diretta da Gianluca Falasca.First half is more “electric” and Osanna plays with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini songs as: “‘A Zingara”, “Introduzione da YS” del Balletto di Bronzo, “Everybody’s gonna see you die”, In un vecchio cieco”, “Vado verso una meta” and “Theme One” (VDGG) to close first half of the gig.The second half start with a tribute to “Milano Calibro 9” movie directed by Fernando Di Leo, with the suite from the album “Preludio Tema Variazioni e Canzona” realised in 1972 with Luis Bacalov; Osanna plays with the “Rosso Rock Ensemble” Orchestra directed by Gianluca Falasca.Following some guests play with Osanna: Giampiero Ingrassia in “There will be time”, Tito Schipa Jr. “Per la Strada” (“Orfeo 9”) and “Fiume” (Landscape of Life), Antonella More, Maurizio Capone and Elio Eco in the final part of gig in “O Cuore e Napule” and “Fuje a chistu paese”.Second DVD “Story” : 20 video clip represent the story of the Band, some are from RAI Archives and there are also videos from Capodistria and some come from private archives. From 1971 to 2009 20 videos show different Osanna line up from time of RAI and TeleCapodistria ‘til recent videos in Naples and Savona. Many different “L’Uomo” versions presented by Renzo Arbore, Enrico Simonetti, Nino Fuscagni, Vanna Brosio and clips taken from “Speciale Tre Milioni”, “Domenica In”, “Amico Flauto”, “Adesso Musica”, “Tutto è Pop” etc.A really exclusive video is the one showing a Pop Festival in Naples “Be-In” (1973) where you can see some “prog” stars on stage...11 videos are taken from the 70s and 9 videos regarding Osanna from 2000 to 2009 including live at Mediterraneo Theatre in Naples in 2001 and live at Chiabrera Theatre in Savona in 2009 with David Jackson, Gianni Leone and Sophya Baccini.
    $33.00
  • I guess miracles do happen. Incredible to think that its been 18 years since Epilog was released. The long promised third album is finally here and it does not disappoint. The boys and girl are back in town and they sound exactly the way they did on Hybris and Epilog. Essentially Anglagard infuse their music with the best elements of 70s prog from Sweden, Germany, and England and do it at the same high standard as the original bands that influenced them. Viljans Oga consists of 4 epic tracks of Mellotron laded symphonic rock bliss.After the band's triumphant return to the stage at Nearfest Apocalypse, the band generously divided up their remaining stock of the new album among the various vendors. For the moment we have a limited stock that we expect to sell out very quickly. More will be on the way shortly. For the moment - if you are reading this grab it because it won't be here the next time you look.BUY OR DIE!
    $18.00
  • Released in the UK in December 1968, "Shine on Brightly” followed on from the huge international success in 1967 of the band’s debut single "A Whiter Shade of Pale” and the follow up single "Homburg” and built on the creative path begun on Procol Harum’s self-titled debut album issued in January 1968. Gary Brooker (voice, piano), Robin Trower (lead guitar), David Knights (bass guitar), B.J. Wilson (drums) and Matthew Fisher (Hammond organ) took the music of the band to new heights with this, their second album. Dominated by the 17-minute epic suite "In Held ‘Twas in I”, Procol Harum re-wrote the rule book of popular music with the material written and recorded for "Shine On Brightly”.Newly re-mastered from the original tapes, this 3 CD clamshell box Deluxe edition of "Shine on Brightly” has been expanded to include the 1968 Mono mix of the album (released on CD for the first time) and 20 bonus tracks (9 previously unreleased) drawn from studio sessions, single mixes and three BBC radio sessions recorded in 1968, featuring 9 previously unreleased recordings.This expanded deluxe edition also includes a lavishly illustrated booklet that fully restores the original album artwork and features a new essay by Procol Harum biographer Henry Scott-Irvine and also includes a poster.Disc One"SHINE ON BRIGHTLY”THE STEREO MIX REMASTERED1. QUITE RIGHTLY SO2. SHINE ON BRIGHTLY3. SKIP SOFTLY (MY MOONBEAMS)4. WISH ME WELL5. RAMBLING ON6. MAGDALENE (MY REGAL ZONOPHONE)7. IN HELD TWAS IN I    a. GLIMSPES OF NIRVANA8. IN HELD TWAS IN I    b. TWAS TEA TIME AT THE CIRCUS9. IN HELD TWAS IN I    c. IN THE AUTUMN OF MY MADNESS10. IN HELD TWAS IN I     d. LOOK TO YOUR SOUL11. IN HELD TWAS IN I     e. GRAND FINALEBONUS TRACKS12. IL TUO DIAMANTE ("SHINE ON BRIGHTLY” ITALIAN VERSION) (MONO)RECORDED IN SEPTEMBER 196713. QUITE RIGHTLY SO14. IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS OF SIXPENCEA & B SIDES OF SINGLEDisc Two"SHINE ON BRIGHTLY”THE MONO MIX REMASTERED(PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED ON CD)1. QUITE RIGHTLY SO2. SHINE ON BRIGHTLY3. SKIP SOFTLY (MY MOONBEAMS)4. WISH ME WELL5. RAMBLING ON6. MAGDALENE (MY REGAL ZONOPHONE)7. IN HELD TWAS IN I    a. GLIMSPES OF NIRVANA8. IN HELD TWAS IN I    b. TWAS TEA TIME AT THE CIRCUS9. IN HELD TWAS IN I    c. IN THE AUTUMN OF MY MADNESS10. IN HELD TWAS IN I     d. LOOK TO YOUR SOUL11. IN HELD TWAS IN I     e. GRAND FINALEDisc Three1. MONSIEUR ARMAND (MONO)2. SEEM TO HAVE THE BLUES (MOST ALL THE TIME) (MONO)3. MAGDELEINE (MY REGAL ZONOPHONE) (1967 MONO VERSION)4. SHINE ON BRIGHTLY (1967 MONO VERSION)5. IN THE WEE SMALL HOURS OF SIXPENCE (STEREO MIX)6. MONSIEUR ARMAND (STEREO BACKING TRACK)7. A ROBE OF SILK (STEREO BACKING TRACK)8. MCGREGOR9. THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO… (WISH ME WELL)10. SKIP SOFTLY (MY MOONBEAMS)11. QUITE RIGHTLY SO12. RAMBLIN’ ON13. SHINE ON BRIGHTLYBBC RADIO ONE SESSION14th FEBRUARY 1968PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED14. SKIP SOFTLY MY MOONBEAMS15. WISH ME WELL16. LONG GONE GEEK"TOP GEAR” BBC RADIO ONE SESSION 19th AUGUST 1968PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED17. IN HELD ‘TWAS IN I (LOOK TO YOUR SOUL /FINALE)"TOP GEAR” BBC RADIO ONE SESSION 6th OCTOBER 1968PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED 
    $33.00
  • Digipak edition with bonus track."These Power Metal merchants are held in high regard thanks to their personnel who have the experience, plus the previous four albums by Silent Force have held the attention mixing the hooks with rampant guitar riffs and their flair for clinical execution.Their last album, 'Walk The Earth', was unleashed back in 2007 so there has been plenty of water under the proverbial bridge leading up to this release.One notable difference for fans of Silent Force is the absence of D.C. Cooper on lead vocals. He has returned to the mighty Danish Melodic Progressive Rock band Royal Hunt and on this album is replaced by Michael Bormann known for his work with Bloodbound and Powerworld.Known as the main brain behind these Metal marauders, Alex Beyrodt starts the proceedings with some Yngwie Malmsteen style fretwork before 'Caught In Their Wicked Game' runs loose. Fast paced and ready to eliminate the competition the band sound hungry and eager to please.The new vocalist here really complements the sound, but may have some struggles winning over purists who yearn for their favourite original singer. 'There Ain't No Justice' and 'Circle Of Trust' both thrust the sword through the torso as the energy remains relentless.I really enjoyed the opening salvo of these three songs the first time I heard this album, through to the fifth spin and so on. The latter of these three tracks retains a pop sensibility, but loses none of the Metal credentials that you'd expect from this band.Not much to find fault about regarding 'Living To Die' which doesn't have the same prominent and obvious hooks as the previous songs, but still retains the quality. Listen out for some tasty keys from Alessandro Del Vecchio in the song 'Before You Run' and there's some mean riffing throughout 'You Gotta Kick It'. The balancing trick between the keys and guitar is the love affair that makes this album so appealing to the ears. They are the real stars from start to finish.Sarah has a lot to answer for as 'Turn Me Loose' tackles a relationship lyrically and maintains the groove in the backdrop. Solid drumming from André Hilgers keeps the good ship Silent Force on course providing a solid backbone, but is still unable to save this song from being below par in comparison to the rest. Perhaps slipping a little through the gears and reaching auto-pilot, 'Born To Be A Fighter' goes through the numbers competently enough, but the sparks aren't flying.Meanwhile, 'Anytime Anywhere' picks up the level of quality and mixes things up with a fine arrangement oozing melodies at each turn. This brings us to the final track 'Kiss Of Death' which chugs along like your favourite Metal anthem. The chorus stands up well and is a great way to round off what overall has been an enjoyable journey.Eight out of ten of the songs here are monuments to their reputation and abilities. Top quality musicianship, crisp production and power found in the crevices are all that I was hoping for initially, plus a feisty and strong delivery from the new vocalist. Thankfully, they tick the boxes consistently apart from a couple of weaker tracks that don't quite reach up to the benchmark they set with the rest of the album. Let power and melody unite in a blissful collision once more, as album number five aligns itself with their back catalogue." - Metal Talk  
    $16.00