L'Ethique

SKU: 14238
Label:
Spalax
Category:
Progressive Rock
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This one has been out of print for many years but recently brought back in limited quantities by Cuneiform. L'Ethique is a great album from what was at the time The Richard Pinhas Band. It featured members of Magma plus a number of musicians that had floated in and out of the Heldon/Pinhas axis over the years. It rocks out mightily in a King Crimson direction interspersed with Pinhas' sheer sound treatments. One of the best albums of the 80s!

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  • "While other musicians mostly vary their repertoire with nuances, every Klaus Schulze performance is hard to predict. His former bandmate Edgar Froese (Tangerine Dream) once needed a nice image when describing his way of improvising on stage with electronic instruments, "This is like a parachute jump where one cannot be sure if the parachute will even open." This was particularly true during the time of the unpredictable, analog synthesizers- but Klaus kept this same work method throughout the years without making any changes. And with this he is one of the few musicians who saved this art of improvising, all during the transition from the analog to the digital era. This is also true according to Schulze's principle, "It is important that I do not have a clue when I should be going onstage." What appears to be a paradox or what smells like absolute randomness is quite the opposite; it is a reference to all factors of this deciding moment along with a full release as well as an arrival. The definite highest point however would be the Amsterdam concert. It may also be that it was the tour's third concert after Warsaw and Berlin and all those involved had perfectly played one after another. But this does not explain the magic and the breathtaking dramaturgy of the entire performance. The non-verbal and deeply emotional interaction between Klaus Schulze and Lisa Gerrard was seldom so homogenous, real union as it was here! - Vol. 2 of the series of 3 volumes "Big in Europe" - Electronic-pioneer Klaus Schulze meets Dead Can Dance-Singer Lisa Gerrard - Complex DigiPac contains 2 CDs and 2 DVDs, as well as a booklet with extended linernotes - "žA Moogumentary II", an exciting and fascinating documentary by french director James L.Frachon on DVD 2."
    $22.00
  • "Balansia is the third release from the instrumental prog outfit from Finland called Hidria Spacefolk. Their music, I discovered, is a more clearer description of what could be truly termed "acid rock" in my mind. Mikko Happos' guitar work explodes like a shooting star that rides, reaches, and discovers an endless night. Janne Lounatvuori accentuates the ride with pulsing, hypnotic synths, electric & acoustic piano, and organ, especially on the songs "Astroban" and "Pajas." The six tunes, which total just over 50 minutes, channel fluidly from the hot (as in molten core) rhythms of Sami Wirkkala's intricate guitar weaves, Kimmo Dammerts' steady bass, and Teemu Kilponen's pounding drums. Hidria Spacefolk is a proper name for this band, as the use of trumpet, cello, slide, vibraphone, and marimba help make the journey complete, adding folk instruments to their sonic approach for a unique sound. The band soars, roars, and rambles through the outer limits of galaxies not yet discovered. Highly recommended!" - Sea Of Tranquility
    $13.00
  • Latest release from Crippled Black Phoenix is marketed as an EP but at 45 minutes in length its anything but.  Longtime vocalist Joe Volk is gone, replaced by John E. Vistic.  The core sound is intact, an expansive, cinematic blend of post rock and early 70s Pink Floyd.  The 12 minute tune "How We Rock" sounds like an instrumental soundtrack piece Floyd would have recorded for a Sergio Leone film.  As far as I'm concerned these guys can do no wrong.
    $16.00
  • "Gazpacho envisaged a story of a man who cuts all ties to the world and moves to a lighthouse to write a mass for Atropos and to taste true solitude. The title is also a wordplay on misanthropy which supposedly plays a part in the concept as well. The album tells the story of what happens inside his head and includes three of his attempts to write the mass as well as the final Missa Atropos."
    $15.00
  • MY BROTHER THE WIND is an improvisational cosmic rock collective consisting of members of widely known Swedish acts Makajodama, Magnolia, Animal Daydream and most notably Anekdoten, one of the more widely recognized names in the 1990s prog rock revival.Recorded live in the studio with no overdubs during a single day in January 2013, Once There Was A Time When Time And Space Were One captures the collective's progressive soundscape qualities with incredible analogue studio production. The band utilized 6 and 12 string acoustic and electric guitars, Mellotron, flute, bass, drums, congas and more to complete the task. Expect 45 minutes of the band's most succinct material to date, recorded deep in the snowy, forested, Swedish wilderness.In 2013, MBTW expanded into an even wider fanbase, having been invited to play the mighty Roadburn Festival in Tilburg, Holland, as well as at Duna Jam in Sardinia.  At the invitation of Opeth’s Mikael Okerfeldt, guitarist Nicklas Barker returned to Roadburn to perform an improv set with Dungen guitarist Reine Fiske.Those who frequent the works of Popol Vuh, Amon Duul, Sun Ra, Träd, Gräs Och Stenar, Albert Ayler, Ash Ra Tempel, Gong, Pink Floyd and other visionary, psychedelic rock artists are advised to investigate this act. "Lush and instrumental for its duration, My Brother the Wind‘s third full-length, Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One (released by Free Electric Sound/Laser’s Edge), rolls out of the speakers much easier than its title rolls off the tongue, though both title and the work itself satisfy rhythmically. The Swedish four-piece — they now seem to be a bass-less trio with Nicklas Barker (Anekdoten) and Mathias Danielsson (Makajodama) on electric/acoustic 12-strong guitar and Daniel Fridlund Brandt on drums, but Ronny Eriksson plays bass on the album — reportedly recorded live to two-inch tape on a vintage machine, and the passion they put in bleeds readily into the nine-song/45-minute outing, fleshed with liberal splashes of Mellotron courtesy of Barker to play up a ’70s prog feel in a piece like the 12-minute “Garden of Delights.” That’s hardly the only point at which those sensibilities emerge, but even more than that, the primary vibe here is one of gorgeous heavy psych exploration, the band adventuring and feeling their way through the material as they go.On peaceful moments like the title-track, which arrives as the penultimate movement before “Epilogue” leads the way back to reality — accordingly, “Prologue” brings us in at the start — that exploration is positively serene, the 12-string complemented by spacious electric tones spreading out across vast reaches, but Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One offers more than drone and psychedelic experiments. Subtly pushed forward by Brandt‘s drums, pieces like “Into the Cosmic Halo” and even “Epilogue” enact classic space rock thrust, and even “Song of Innocence Part 1,” the first part of the journey after the backward atmospherics of “Prologue” introduce, has some cosmic feel amid its echoing solos. Its subsequent complement, “Song of Innocence Part 2,” swells to life on an even more active roll, waves of amp noise up front while drums and bass groove out behind, waiting for the guitars to catch up, which they do in a suitably glorious payoff, relatively brief but masterfully engaging, setting a momentum that continues well into “Garden of Delights,” a focal point for more than its length.Because the songs flow so well one to the next, some directly bleeding, others giving a brief pause, and because later cuts like “Thomas Mera Gartz” — named in honor of the drummer for ’70s Swedish proggers Träd, Gräs och Stenar — and the title-track have a quieter take, it’s tempting to read some narrative into the shifts of Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One, but with the material not being premeditated, I’m not sure that’s the intention so much as a signal it’s well arranged. In any case, the album offers an immersive, resonant listen, with tonal richness to spare and the presence of mind to keep a sense of motion even in its stillest parts and a balance of organic elements — Danielsson‘s recorder and Brandt‘s percussion on “Misty Mountainside,” the 12-string, etc. — amid a wash of effects and swirling psychedelia. This attention to sonic detail makes Once There was a Time When Time and Space were One more than just a collection of jams, and adds further purpose to the already worthy cause of My Brother the Wind‘s thoughtful musings, wandering and not at all lost." - The Obelisk
    $13.00
  • First time on CD - now available as a mini-lp sleeve version as well. Luna was a quartet put together by Osanna guitarist Corrado Rustici after their breakup. Released in 1981 it didn't have much success. The music has progressive overtones and Rustici offers his usual great playing but overall I would put file this one under the melodic rock category and leave it for Italian prog completists only.
    $21.00
  • "Henry Fool's Men Singing is an ambitious four track instrumental album featuring members of No-Man, I Monster and Roxy Music. Equal parts dynamic drums, spiky guitars and atmospheric washes of fluttering flutes and vintage keyboards, the album was produced and arranged by Stephen Bennett (keyboards) and Tim Bowness (guitar), and mixed by Jarrod Gosling (I Monster/Regal Worm), who also contributes Mellotron, glockenspiel and artwork. Appearing on two of the four tracks, Phil Manzanera's legendary guitar skills can be heard in the context of long-form instrumental music for the first time since his celebrated stint in 1970s mavericks Quiet Sun. Other contributions come from Peter Chilvers (bass), Michael Bearpark (guitar), Andrew Booker (drums), Myke Clifford (sax/flute) and violinist Steve Bingham. A vibrant and instinctive contemporary take on Progressive, Psychedelic and Jazz Rock styles, Men Singing is available as a limited edition cd in vinyl replica artwork. Mastered by Pink Floyd sound engineer, Andy Jackson."
    $15.00
  • New Steven Wilson mix taken from the original multi-track tapes. OK here is what you get:CD (Original Album 2010 mix)"Peace: A Beginning""Pictures of a City""Cadence & Cascade""In The Wake of Poseidon""Peace: A Theme""Cat Food""The Devil's Triangle (part I)""The Devil's Triangle (part II)""The Devil's Triangle (part III)""Peace: An End"Bonus Tracks"Groon""Peace: An End" - Alternate mix"Cadence & Cascade" (Greg Lake guide vocal version)DVD-AMLP Lossless 5.1 Surround/DTS 5.1 Digital Surround - 2010 mix:"Peace: A Beginning""Pictures of a City""Cadence & Cascade""In The Wake of Poseidon""Peace: A Theme""Cat Food""The Devil's Triangle (part I)""The Devil's Triangle (part II)""The Devil's Triangle (part III)""Peace: An End""Groon"MLP lossless/LPCM - 2010 stereo mix:"Peace: A Beginning""Pictures of a City""Cadence & Cascade""In The Wake of Poseidon""Peace: A Theme""Cat Food""The Devil's Triangle (part I)""The Devil's Triangle (part II)""The Devil's Triangle (part III)""Peace: An End""Groon"Original 1970 stereo mix, 30th anniversary remaster:"Peace: A Beginning""Pictures of a City""Cadence & Cascade""In The Wake of Poseidon""Peace: A Theme""Cat Food""The Devil's Triangle (part I)""The Devil's Triangle (part II)""The Devil's Triangle (part III)""Peace: An End"Bonus Tracks"Cat Food" (single version)"Groon" (single b-side)"Cadence & Cascade" (unedited master)"Cadence & Cascade" (Greg Lake guide vocal version)"Cadence & Cascade" (instrumental take from Wessex Studios)"Groon" - Take 1"Groon" - Take 5"Groon" - Take 15"The Devil's Triangle" (rehearsal version from Wessex Studios)"Peace: An End" (alternative mix)
    $22.00
  • "Originally released in 1998, the new SPV Super Value edition of Sky Of Avalon has been remastered by Uli Jon Roth and contains a bonus video track and an all new booklet with rare photos and liner notes by Uli John Roth. li Jon Roth is without doubt one of the most eminent and influential guitarists of the international music scene. Be it as a long-time member with the Scorpions, founder and mastermind of his own band Electric Sun or as a solo artist, whose brilliant symphonic rock concept Sky Of Avalon caused a stir with its exciting m‚lange of classical music and rock: the musician from Hanover has already had a lasting influence on the music world. In 1993 Roth made a name for himself in the classic crossover sector as the musical director of an extremely successful production called 'Symphonic Rock For Europe', which was broadcast by the German TV channel WDR. As part of the production, his first complete symphony Europa Ex Favilla was performed by almost one hundred artists from the Brussels Symphonic Orchestra, together with a large choir and a rock band. The theme was taken up again in 1995, when Roth's Puccini treatment Bridge To Heaven - performed by vocalist Klaus Meine with Roth on guitar - was celebrated during the great Jos‚ Carreras Christmas Gala in Leipzig. Since leaving the Scorpions, Roth repeatedly became the talking point in the rock genre. In 1991 U.J. Roth, undisputedly Thee German authority when it comes to authentic rock interpretations, was asked to take on the musical direction of the WDR TV special A Different Side Of Jimi Hendrix. The result was a moving TV spectacle, with Roth alongside Jack Bruce (Cream), Simon Philips (Toto, The Who, Bob Dylan among others), Jule Neigel, Randy Hansen, Zeno and Peter Bursch performing a fascinating repertoire of Hendrix' compositions, which was praised on an international level. Roth dedicated the concert to Monika Dannemann, Jimi Hendrix' last girlfriend and later Roth's partner for over twenty years before her tragic death in 1996."
    $12.00
  • "I can't wait. I should have reviewed other albums before this but it's the first thing that I listen from this artist and I wasn't expecting anything like this. Symphonic orchestral arrangements on melodic bases and a concept behind. I'm not expert in William Blake's poetry but this album has made me curious.The introduction "William" is a symphonic piece of beauty with a guitar of the "not a misplaced note" kind, like Andy Latimer is used to do, some "mute" vocals and a very nice melody. A stunning surprise."Angel Of The Revelation" starts with electronics and piano, then vocals and a proper song starts. The high pitched voice of Sophya joined in a choir by whom? Maybe Sonja Kristina who features in the guests? The guests list is another thing to check. This is a progressive track as I think people usually intends "progressive": sung parts alternated with instrumentals, structured as a suite with different movements and recurring themes. And all in 4 minutes and half."Satan" has an obsessive rhythm and has the theathrical flavor of a rock opera. The electronics behind have a vintage sound but is remarkable the dialogue between guitar and piano before the last sung part and the coda. Another great song."Love Of Hecate" Is a slow waltz. It's folky and theathrical in the same time, with excellent vocals again. The signature changes in the chorus. It's still a 3/4 (almost) but the tempo is accelerated. Vocals like in Mozart's magic flute are replaced by a cymbal, then piano and vocals. Another very complex and "circular" song.Percussive piano and bass with water sounds to start "La Porta Dell'Inferno". This is a little mistake: it's taken from Dante's Comedy, but the door should lead to the "anti-inferno". The first lyrics are taken from Dante, then the man talking leaves the Dante's book to give a different view of the hell's entrance. "Here nothing grows because nothing dies". Another great song with the music perfectly fitting with the concept. The violins support the whole track, choirs, a stupendous coda... Great.After a track like the previous one staying on the same level is very difficult, so the style changes totally. "The Number" is a rock song. Of course the number is 666. It starts hard rock, but with no relations with Iron Maiden, and the rock screamed part is alternated to more quiet and symphonic interludes. The organ is excellent, neither Emerson nor Wakeman, the sound reminds me more to Vitalij Kuprij (Artension)."Just" is opened by percussion, piano and cello. The theme recalls "La Porta Dell'Inferno" but the vocals take a different direction. The song's intro, before the male singing, makes me think to the Russian Iamthemorning, mainly because of the instruments used. However, after 2 minutes the song changes drastically. The impression is still of a rock opera. Remove the metal element from Ayreon and add more symphonics to have an idea. The vocals here are more operatic. Not enough to think to Zeuhl, but enough to enhance the track. Great guitar solo in a Van Halen style which slows down and closes Floydian before the last sung reprise."Cerberus" is the three-headed infernal dog. Keyboard and strings introduce the song which reprises the chords of the main theme. It's on this song that I'm almost sure Sonja Kristina is singing. I don't know it for sure because I have received a download link from Blackwidow records and I haven't seen the notes on the CD. This is a very dark song on which the rock-opera factor is very relevant. I want to add the the most I listen to this album the most I'm surprised. It's surely one of the best albums I've listened to during all the 2013."While He's Sleeping" starts in a weird way respect to the symphonic mood of the previous tracks. It's still classically influenced but has a touch of Canterbury, especially in the melody. Not an easy track, but very enjoyable.Back to full orchestra and theatrical suggestions. "Au Matin Du Premier Jour" (At the morning of the first day) is sung in French by a man who sounds like the chansonniers of the end 50s / early 60s. French and operatic don't mean Magma, but this song has a Zeuhl flavor in the instrumental parts."Beatrice" brings us back to Dante's Comedy. To Paradise now. Her character would deserve some words but this would lead us off topic. Of course there's less darkness now. Piano and ethereal voice for a very melodic song. A Sophya's solo performance and let me add that the sequence of chords deserves a mention. There's plenty of good passages. excellent also from the composition point of view.We are now at the title track. Full orchestra and voice plus some electronics behind. It starts like a symphony and turns into rock. I don't know who's the male singer but his voice is incredible. The mood is still of a rock opera I'm finishing the words...The album is closed by a cover. "Jerusalem" has been played and recorded by the likes of Vangelis, Emerson Lake and Palmer, Par Lindh Project for what I remember. Well, I must say that it's probably the best version that I've heard up to now. It's a new interpretation when the one from Par Lindh was an ELP clone.A masterpiece, amazing because unexpected. How can an artist that I've never heard before have done a thing like this? Symphonic proggers and RPI fans will surely agree with me, but there's so many stuff in this album. It will stay in my portable reader for a very long time, I think." - ProgArchives
    $16.00
  • Fourth and final studio album from the original lineup. Still plenty of good stuff here but marred a bit by an attempt at English vocals.
    $18.00
  • "Since the early days of Sonic Pulsar, Portugal's Hugo Flores's output has been prolific and impressive - and Factory Of Dreams is his latest project.Designed to counterpoint the complexity of his Project Creation music, Factory Of Dreams is - by comparison - more straightforward and approachable, less creative and experimental, and it's song-oriented instead of a sweeping concept piece.Poles should find a wide audience as it slots neatly into the genre originally created by The Gathering, and since enriched by luminaries such as Within Temptation, Nightwish, Edenbridge, Lacuna Coil, After Forever, and Epica - et al. It is goth metal, though the 'metal' label is used lightly, fronted by the rich soprano of Sweden's Jessica Lehto. But unlike its genre-mates, Factory Of Dreams isn't a band - it's a 2-person project, an Internet collaboration, with vocals and many arrangements provided by Jessica while multi-instrumentalist Flores provides the rest. Consequently, there's a fair amount of variety from track to track, though the dynamics and the energy - and the synth percussion - are consistent, and some might accuse each song of sounding somewhat similar to the next.Although it isn't a concept piece in the sense of the complicated Project Creation story, Flores remains close to his sci-fi story roots with this one. The theme here revolves around a place on some distant planet comprising two lands called Poles, separated by a river, divided by good and evil - or "positiveness and negativeness". This world is ruled by a "Generator Of Illusions", hence the Factory of Dreams title. It gets more complex, and hints tenuously at modern society's inclination to ingest what we're told as the absolute truth. That may sound somewhat over the top, but the theme does add a layer of sophistication to the record."Electric Boom" is a guitar-led piece, and showcases Flores's virtuosity on his primary instrument - rich guitar work underscored by a fat fretless bass, and only a few brief lines sung by Jessica. "Air Powerplant" is a standout - one of the simpler tracks, yet the tempo changes from elegant piano work to a huge metallic wall of sound, and with Jessica slipping in and out of an operatic style, it has an appeal of its own. "The Piano In The Sea" is another soft ballad, with piano and electronica floating above that soothing songstress. Closing track "Crossing The Bridge To The Positive Pole" ends rather abruptly, leading you to check your CD player - because surely there ought to be another song?If you're a fan of the progressive goth format of a semi-operatic soprano contrasting dark atmospherics and power-chord driven bass-heavy hard-rock, Factory Of Dreams is not Poles apart from others in the genre - but it's a pleasing listen, and has a lot going for it." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $3.00
  • New electric band effort from Mr. Hackett was long overdue. Wild Orchids marks the return of keyboardist Nick Magnus to the fold. The rest of the band are the cats that Steve has been recording and touring with for years now but there are augmented by the "Underworld Orchestra". The music has a subdued laid back vibe but of course we get those trademark withering solos that are unmistakably pure Hackett. Some world music influences creep into the mix in spots reminding of Peter Gabriel's solo work, while other tracks evoke the feel of Please Don't Touch. One curious inclusion is a cover of Bob Dylan's "The Man In The Long Black Coat" - Steve slays on it but...
    $15.00
  • "People go on about how many members have been in The Fall, but I reckon even more have passed through Hawkwind. The Notting Hill counter-culture of 1969 in which they formed is a lifetime away,  on another planet, and only Dave Brock remains from those wild, formative years under the Westway with Lemmy, Bob Calvert and co. But they still travel with that aura of proper rock'n'roll mythology – extreme, even insane, too far out, uncompromising and sometimes brutally overpowering.On this typically peculiar new album of old songs refreshed, new mixes, and new tracks, intimations of their original greatness bleed through. First off, there’s original guitarist Huw Lloyd-Langton (one of the great undersung British guitarists) on what may be his last recording, a retooled "Master of the Universe", and his lines are melodic, wailing, sensitive and powerful. There’s no other player like him.Then there’s Hawkwind’s equivalent of selfies – old tracks re-recorded – including Warrior on the Edge of Time’s "Assault & Battery/Golden Void", which is enjoyable without touching the hem of the 1975 original, and a haunting, haunted "We Took The Wrong Step", a lament which has only increased in sadness and weight since it was released on X In Search of Space in 1971. Finally, there are remixed songs from the current (stable) line-up’s recent albums, and a scattering of new tracks that veer from the ersatz to the properly weird.This was released to coincide with a US tour, their first in decades, and postponed on account of 1970s frontman Nik Turner touring at the same time, and some confusing business over band-name trademarking. It would be better if Turner and Brock buried the hatchet in each other’s heads and got on stage together; the cheers would be enormous. But bad blood sloshes around their long history, and that, like Brock’s churning, propulsive guitar, remains another constant in the band’s epic, Game of Thrones-style history." - The Arts Desk
    $6.00