Living Madness

SKU: 889211543502
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Private Release
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" Living Madness, available everywhere June 16, is VANGOUGH's crowd-funded live CD that was recorded while on tour with Pain of Salvation last fall. Topping just over 40 minutes with seven tracks; Living Madness is a testament to VANGOUGH's unhinged and dominating live performances, which touched down in such cities as New York City, Toronto, Seattle and San Diego among others.

Taking a cue from their 2013 album Between the Madness, VANGOUGH have upped the ante in terms of ferocity as is displayed here on their live release. Featuring tracks from across the band's career, including a medley from 2009's debut Manikin Parade, fans will be very pleased to hear their favorite tracks in a new way. "Seeing as this was our very first tour, we wanted to capture all the raw energy and emotion you'd expect from a first-time touring act."

Recorded by guest guitarist Cameron Conyer, Living Madness was then mixed back in Dallas by long-time collaborator and producer Sterling Winfield. "I love working with Sterling and always trust him to produce a killer mix." The band also connected with famed album artist Travis Smith for the cover. "We felt like it was time to further shift the artwork into a more brooding and disturbing direction as is befitting of where we're headed. Travis' vision fit perfectly with ours."

"Most importantly, this album was made possible by our amazing fans who backed us via our Kickstarter campaign. We are truly humbled by their show of support and hope that this album is a reflection of how hard we work to bring you the very best that VANGOUGH has to offer.""

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