Lost In The Black Divide

SKU: PSRCD152
Label:
Pure Steel
Category:
NWOBHM
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"First off, when you check the name SPACE VACATION it sounds like they might be a Psychedelic Retro-band style outfit. Then you hear them and you think of classic NWOBHM- IRON MAIDEN/ early DEF LEPPARD, maybe a British or European band. In fact, SPACE VACATION are from San Francisco and play pure Heavy Metal. There is melody throughout but the style is straight-ahead Heavy Metal. I can’t help but think this sounds like a modern take on early PRAYING MANTIS. MANTIS were the most skilful NWOBHM band next to MAIDEN and very melodic but still heavy. This band is in that zone. It’s really easy stuff to listen to. The Galloping bass and guitars, great melody, harmonising guitar solos and good vocals and choruses. This is old school with a modern delivery.

“Devil To Pay” kicks off with feedback guitars in a very 80’s sound similar to the first DIO album. The vocals are very melodic; however, the music is in a true Metal style and is heavier than the likes of RATT or QUIET RIOT, for example. Although the bands of reference are 80’s era, the sound is updated to sound original. This is highly entertaining Metal. “Stay Away” has a nice bass sound. It is tuned to the key of “Steve Harris” and this provides a nice familiar feel for any traditional Metal fan. This is a mid-paced track with great tempo and vocal combination with the bass lines. I can almost detect a bit of synth guitar in there to provide variation. The guitar solo peels away delightfully in the key of “Dave Murray”. It may sound familiar but it is great song.

“See you Again” starts with a riff that is pure PRAYING MANTIS with that beautiful melodic twiddling sound. This is probably the least Metal track with a Soft Rock feel, but done really well. “Roll The Dice” pounds away nicely with a drum-driven pace and more of a UFO/  SCHENKER guitar break and harmonising vocal. These songs have a very warm rhythm section with the galloping bass and drums. The guitars are not really duel attack in style though. Kiyoshi seems to handle the riffs and stops to break for the solos with Scott providing support. Everything is very neat and clean in the guitar department.

“Enemy” has really nice melody to it with the vocals shining through. The guitar riff overlays the song well and the solo is brought in similar to a THIN LIZZY track. “The Black Divide” is a stand-out song. This has a real Metal riff and the song picks up pace similar to early METALLICA (with more melody). There is fast riffing and headbanging rhythm. Then a slow breakdown but with a big riff over the top and a great guitar solo at the end to give the song three or four phases. This is Classic traditional Metal for sure.

“Reason or Rhyme” is a grand sounding track. There is piano and a story-telling style harmonised vocal. This has a touch of Pomp Rock to it and gives variation to the album. There are subdued lower- tuned guitars that sit nicely in the mix. This gives the song a classical music feel and orchestration. The drums pound and roll before the song breaks down to the piano again to provide light and shade. The album finishes with “Through the Door” which returns to the NWOBHM influence. This has that classic riffing and energy synonymous with NWOBHM. There is a nice Richie Blackmore style solo on this one and bass line compliment. It’s a truly great track.

Overall, “Lost In The Black Divide” contains highly entertaining traditional Heavy Metal sounds. The band is playing live with some other New Wave of Traditional Heavy Metal bands and providing great live entertainment. For anyone with Metal running through their veins this is highly recommended. I think fans of more Extreme Metal will also enjoy this record." - Metal Temple

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  • • This Acid solution has nothing to do with the lysergic excesses of late 60s American rock, or the dance craze of the late 80s UK. This dose of Acid are the female-fronted, cult heavy metal quintet from early 80s Belgium. From Bruges, in fact.• Taking their cue from the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal movement that gave us Iron Maiden, Saxon and Diamond Head, they featured lead singer Kate De Lombaert, Demon on lead guitar, Dizzy Lizzy on rhythm guitar, T-Bone on bass and Anvill on drums. After releasing their debut single for the legendary HM label Roadrunner in 1981, Acid recorded three highly influential slabs of pure, unadulterated heavy metal for their own Giant Records between 1982 and 1985.• Reissued with band approval and their full involvement, and featuring liner notes from Acid expert and Classic Rock/Metal Hammer writer Malcolm Dome, this release features the bonus tracks HELL ON WHEELS (7” Version), HOOKED ON METAL (7” Version), FIVE DAYS HELL (Demo Version) and WOMAN AT LAST (Demo Version).• Also available from Acid are the second studio album "Maniac" from 1983 and third release "Engine Beast" from 1985, both with non-album bonus material.• For fans of Judas Priest, Motörhead and Venom.
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  • Limited edition of 500 copies."Every now and then you make a connection with some early piece of aural obscurity, something you've long toiled over but never quite molted with. Suddenly, the realization of genius becomes so clear, as if it were staring at you through a mirror all along. Firedance is one of situations. Far ahead of its time, and almost unheard of by anyone outside the diminishing circle of NWOBHM collectors and old metal explorers. One can only marvel that Shiva were not a raging success. After all, they struck at a time when the waters were right for progressive rock and metal, with bands like Rush and Yes topping the charts and British metal and hard rock exploding into the next big thing.Shiva possessed both of these characteristics. One might even imagine them the perfect coupling of Rush and the American band Riot, with superb songwriting skills that put the majority of their NWOBHM peers to complete shame. But perhaps this band was just too smart for the period in which it arrived, and tragically resigned to the status of a non-entity, while bands like Judas Priest, Def Leppard and Iron Maiden would soar past them. The tragedy is that they probably gave up too soon. A few more albums like Firedance and it would have been nearly impossible for anyone to ignore them, and with progressive metal labels springing up in the 90s like Inside Out, they would have undoubtedly found a reliable home. But all we have to remember them by are a few demos, a compilation of unreleased material, and this one near masterpiece of a debut album.Shiva was a power trio by definition, and by that I mean each of the members possessed enormous talent at his given instrument. Chris Logan was a skilled drummer, but never over indulgent here, and Andy Skuse has a beautiful, popping bass tone that never rolls over to play dead for the guitar. Speaking of the six-strings, the true center of the band must be John Hall, who performed both the vocals and guitars, and has quite a good run with each. His tones were sweet, clear and smooth, characteristic of many peers but not so sharp or piercing as a Kevin Heybourne (from fellow NWOBHM power trio Angel Witch). No, he reminds me quite a lot of Geddy Lee from the 70s Rush recordings, and his selection of notes is always teeming with life, perfectly married to the cycle of classic metal riffing and bluesy leads that lie beneath. The result is an album, Firedance, which would appeal far beyond the core metal fan of the day, to the lover of blues, progressive rock and perhaps even folk rock. Fly By Night meets Fire Down Under? Sign me up.Shiva never forget that they're a metal band first and foremost, and tracks like "How Can I?" and the amazing "Wild Machine" display a strength in creative, accessible riffing that moves beyond some mere mutation of Judas Priest, Sabbath and Deep Purple. Not the sinister groove that hangs at the end of the verse of "Wild Machine", before a robotic voice heralds a most glorious 'silent chorus' riff. "Borderline" shows a little more of a roadster spin, as if it were Shiva's take on something like "Living After Midnight". The vocals are superb, and they'd be alluring enough without the excellent guitars. But you are gifted with both. "Stranger Lands" journeys further into the realm of progressive rock, with a carousel of Skuse's wonderful lines. "Angel of Mons" is drifting and desperate, and "User" burns with the heat of molten, classic metal. The band's namesake "Shiva" is another impressive offering, with a crazy synthesizer break near the finale that immediately lifts the imagination above some creative percussion.The band accomplishes all of this without the inflated, excess song structures that many prog rockers were often guilty of. This is no Tales from Topographical Oceans, it's constantly aware of its status as a hard, driving rock record, but one of a positive life affirmation more than morose infatuation. It's not so mystic as to become psychedelic, but its sure to deliver the goods that a Rush fan demands from anything that band carved out in their initial decade of output. Well worth tracking down if you fancy other prog/NWOBHM crossover acts like Saracen or Budgie, and though it nears 30 years in age, its highly enduring." - Metal Archives
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  • "This re-issue of mid-era Saxon displays all of the fire and passion that has helped to make Saxon an all-time undisputed classic heavy metal band. Ever since their 1979 debut, the band has admirably stayed the course, dishing out album after album of pure, unadulterated metal. "Unleash The Beast" is no exception and deserves a place in every Metalhead s collection."
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  • • This dose of Acid has nothing to do with the druggy excesses of late 60s US rock, or the techno craze of the late 80s UK. This preparation of Acid are the female-fronted, cult heavy metal fivesome from 1980s Bruges, in Belgium.• Highly influenced by the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal, a movement that gave us Iron Maiden, Saxon and Diamond Head, Acid featured lead singer Kate De Lombaert, Demon on lead guitar, Dizzy Lizzy on rhythm guitar, T-Bone on bass and Anvill on drums. They recorded three highly influential slabs of pure, unadulterated heavy metal for their own Giant Records between 1982 and 1985.• Reissued with band approval and their full involvement, and featuring liner notes from Acid expert and Classic Rock/Metal Hammer writer Malcolm Dome, this release features the bonus tracks drop DEAD, THE DAY YOU DIE and EXTERMINATOR.• Also available from Acid are their debut studio album "Acid" from 1982 and third release, 1985's "Engine Beast", both with non-album bonus material.• For fans of Judas Priest, Motörhead and Venom.
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  • "First off, when you check the name SPACE VACATION it sounds like they might be a Psychedelic Retro-band style outfit. Then you hear them and you think of classic NWOBHM- IRON MAIDEN/ early DEF LEPPARD, maybe a British or European band. In fact, SPACE VACATION are from San Francisco and play pure Heavy Metal. There is melody throughout but the style is straight-ahead Heavy Metal. I can’t help but think this sounds like a modern take on early PRAYING MANTIS. MANTIS were the most skilful NWOBHM band next to MAIDEN and very melodic but still heavy. This band is in that zone. It’s really easy stuff to listen to. The Galloping bass and guitars, great melody, harmonising guitar solos and good vocals and choruses. This is old school with a modern delivery.“Devil To Pay” kicks off with feedback guitars in a very 80’s sound similar to the first DIO album. The vocals are very melodic; however, the music is in a true Metal style and is heavier than the likes of RATT or QUIET RIOT, for example. Although the bands of reference are 80’s era, the sound is updated to sound original. This is highly entertaining Metal. “Stay Away” has a nice bass sound. It is tuned to the key of “Steve Harris” and this provides a nice familiar feel for any traditional Metal fan. This is a mid-paced track with great tempo and vocal combination with the bass lines. I can almost detect a bit of synth guitar in there to provide variation. The guitar solo peels away delightfully in the key of “Dave Murray”. It may sound familiar but it is great song.“See you Again” starts with a riff that is pure PRAYING MANTIS with that beautiful melodic twiddling sound. This is probably the least Metal track with a Soft Rock feel, but done really well. “Roll The Dice” pounds away nicely with a drum-driven pace and more of a UFO/  SCHENKER guitar break and harmonising vocal. These songs have a very warm rhythm section with the galloping bass and drums. The guitars are not really duel attack in style though. Kiyoshi seems to handle the riffs and stops to break for the solos with Scott providing support. Everything is very neat and clean in the guitar department.“Enemy” has really nice melody to it with the vocals shining through. The guitar riff overlays the song well and the solo is brought in similar to a THIN LIZZY track. “The Black Divide” is a stand-out song. This has a real Metal riff and the song picks up pace similar to early METALLICA (with more melody). There is fast riffing and headbanging rhythm. Then a slow breakdown but with a big riff over the top and a great guitar solo at the end to give the song three or four phases. This is Classic traditional Metal for sure.“Reason or Rhyme” is a grand sounding track. There is piano and a story-telling style harmonised vocal. This has a touch of Pomp Rock to it and gives variation to the album. There are subdued lower- tuned guitars that sit nicely in the mix. This gives the song a classical music feel and orchestration. The drums pound and roll before the song breaks down to the piano again to provide light and shade. The album finishes with “Through the Door” which returns to the NWOBHM influence. This has that classic riffing and energy synonymous with NWOBHM. There is a nice Richie Blackmore style solo on this one and bass line compliment. It’s a truly great track.Overall, “Lost In The Black Divide” contains highly entertaining traditional Heavy Metal sounds. The band is playing live with some other New Wave of Traditional Heavy Metal bands and providing great live entertainment. For anyone with Metal running through their veins this is highly recommended. I think fans of more Extreme Metal will also enjoy this record." - Metal Temple
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  • • This Acid mixture has nothing to do with the lysergic excesses of late 60s American rock, or the UK Acieed of the late 80s. This dose of Acid are the highly influential, female-fronted, cult heavy metal quintet from early 80s Bruges in Belgium.• Taking their cue from the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal movement that gave us Iron Maiden, Saxon and Diamond Head, and featuring lead singer Kate De Lombaert, Demon on lead guitar, Dizzy Lizzy on rhythm guitar, T-Bone on bass and Anvill on drums, Acid recorded three highly influential slabs of pure, unadulterated heavy metal for their own Giant Records between 1982 and 1985.• Reissued with band approval and their full involvement, and featuring liner notes from Acid expert and Classic Rock/Metal Hammer writer Malcolm Dome, this release features the bonus tracks HEAVEN’S DEVILS (DEMO VERSION), POWER (DEMO VERSION), HOOKED ON METAL (DEMO VERSION) and HELL ON WHEELS (DEMO VERSION).• Also available from Acid are the debut studio album "Acid" from 1982 plus follow up "Maniac" from 1983, both with non-album bonus material.• For fans of Judas Priest, Motörhead and Venom.
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  • "NWOBHM legends Satan are one of the greatest comeback stories in recent memory. Formed in the UK in 1979, the band’s early work was part of the blueprint for what became thrash and speed metal. However, Satan themselves had a rough career, plagued by lineup issues and multiple name changes, resulting in nearly two decades of non-activity. They eventually returned to the live stage in 2004, but no one could have predicted 2013’s Life Sentence, a blast of well-crafted, authentic, damn-near-perfect heavy metal that had seemingly been frozen in amber since about 1982. Two years later, the band returns with Atom By Atom, another collection of classic metal that threatens to put all other old-schoolers to shame.Singer Brian Ross’ glass-shattering scream kicks off opening cut “Farewell Evolution,” a speedy number that splits the difference between “Aces High” and perhaps Kill ‘Em All-era Metallica. Ross’ voice is seemingly ageless, capable of the same piercing highs and rich midrange displayed on 1983’s classic Court In The Act. “Fallen Savior” is a more midtempo rocker with a chorus so anthemic, I can already hear thousands of old-schoolers singing along to it at metal festivals next summer.Production-wise, Atom By Atom is nearly identical to Life Sentence, which is very much a good thing. The instruments all sound appropriately raw and 1980s-vintage, Ross’ vocals are given just enough reverb to make it work, and the performances sound remarkably like an actual band playing in a room together. These are all admirable qualities in a metal record, and I commend the band for sticking with them.“Ruination” is another extremely well-composed track, utilizing guitar harmonies and a slightly prog arrangement as buildup to a waltz riff that makes me want to hit people with a mic stand. Throughout this record, the guitar interplay between Steve Ramsey and Russ Tippins is incredible to witness, and is a huge part of what makes Satan‘s comeback feel so right. The vintage tones, semi-technical riffage, and tradeoff solos are practically a clinic on how heavy metal guitar should be done.The title track boasts yet another top-shelf classic riff and yet another monstrous chorus. At this point I’m wondering how the world didn’t already have these songs in it until now, because they feel like they’ve always been there. “In Contempt” is another master class of technical and harmonically complex guitar work, with some sections that border on thrash metal and some flashy fills from drummer Sean Taylor. (Side bar: considering Satan‘s history of courtroom puns as album titles, I’m surprised “In Contempt” wasn’t the name of this record.)Side 2 of Atom By Atom takes a slight dip in quality from the material on Side 1. “My Own God” is a little hokey lyrically, although I certainly agree with the sentiment. And after all the ridiculously tasty guitar work preceding it, “Bound in Enmity” can only be seen as somewhat redundant. However, the band still has one ace up their sleeve: closing track “The Fall Of Persephone.” Satan goes all-out on this one, with harmonized leads, exotic guitar textures, and huge choirs of vocals, among other things. This song is, frankly, fucking stunning, and ends the album on an extremely high note.Proving that Life Sentence was no fluke, Satan continues to churn out white-hot classic metal and make it look easy. There are very few bands from this era who are still making music this vital and high-quality. Atom By Atom is another nearly-flawless victory, and if you enjoy heavy metal music, I suggest you check it out." - Angry Metal Guy
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  • 24 bit gold disc remastered edition of the second album from this oddball NWOBHM band. Comes with one bonus track.
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  • "New Wave Of British Heavy Metal act Apocalypse from London was formed by guitarist Steve Grainger around 1980.  The band emerged from two bands in North London. Phaze and Stone Lady. Originally Nick Brent Dave (MEX) Higgen (Stone Lady) and Marc and Steve Grainger.(Phaze) Mex left the band to move in a different direction and to set up the Octave Studio and PA Company in North London. Dave Robertson joined and Apocalypse were established. Ironicallyi t was Dave (mex) higgen who named the band APOCALYPSE.It took the band two years to release their one and only single called "Stormchild" for Gate Records. After minor personnel problems with another band of the same name the band changed their name to Omega and recorded the number “Blood Sacrifice” for Ebony's rather obscure “Metal Warriors” compilation (issued in 1983).Steve Grainger explains that APOCALYPSE was more or less forced to look for a new name: “We were aware of one other band in the UK called APOCALYPSE, they were completely non-apocalyptic if you ask me. More of a pop band. But they were under the guidance of a major player in the UK music business so we felt that we would have to change our name. I was always against this. I thought they should change their name but I was overruled. We did get a fair bit of music press coverage during the argument though, so it was not all bad news."“The Prophet” was originally released on Rock Machine (basically a subdivision of Punk label Razor Records) in 1985. The line up consisted of Dave Robertson (bass, vocals), Nick Brent (guitars, vocals), Steve Grainger (lead guitars, keyboards, vocals) and Graham Roberts (drums). The High Roller re-issue of the album comes with new, superior cover artwork. The CD edition contains unreleased demo recordings of “Summertime”, “Heat of the Night”, “Abandon Hope”, “Blood Sacrifice” and “The Child” as exclusive bonus material.Steve Grainger explains how the original deal with Rock Machine came about in 1985: “There was a sniff of interest from one or two labels but nothing came of it, we weren't considered a big enough band. We would have tried to do it on our own again on Gate Records but then Rock Machine (aka Razor Records) got involved and we took it from there. Rock Machine kept sales figures pretty close to their chests but it was released worldwide on license. Nick and I regained the rights after five years [though, I think,delete this bit SG"> and that's how we are in a position to be re-releasing it again now on our own terms. I guess a few thousand must have been released, you can still pick up the original vinyl online, so they are about.” "The Prophet" was illegally re-issued on vinyl a couple of years back. Those counterfeit copies are annoying to any self-respecting rock band. “I have never traced exactly who was doing what”, states Steve Grainger. “It comes from Comet Records in Italy I believe, probably an original license holder to release the vinyl, but they took it further without permission to create a CD version and stick their logo on it. They are, I suspect, also behind a recent i-tunes/ e-music download. Apple have, to their credit, taken it off their site but I am still dealing with e-music who are less than quick in this matter. I have a copy of the i-tunes payment schedule but it doesn't say who the recipient of the money is.”Somehow the band Omega was lumped in with a few other progressive-sounding N.W.O.B.H.M. bands like Shiva, Chemical Alice, Legend (Jersey) and Bleakhouse. “We were not bothered about that, really”, says Steve. “We were in our own little bubble, doing our own thing and consciously avoiding whatever was trendy at the time. If people liked what we did that was great, if they didn't, then ... so what? We were in many ways quite reclusive in our writing. I certainly went out of my way to not be influenced too much by other bands. We like to do things our way and that was that.”The press was pretty kind to Omega in Britain as Steve explains: “The reviews were quite reassuring from the British music press. It was hardly front page stuff as far as they were concerned but they liked it on the whole, Europe was okay with it as I recall. Some French radio station did a show featuring it and from what I gather they loved it, they were particularly enthusiastic about my guitar work … hurrah! It was the American reviews that seemed to put a dampener on the album. I don't think that they got the idea of the prophet being metaphoric, taking it as a literal slur didn't go down too well. Also there was a feeling from them that they didn't want to be reminded about the 'doom and gloom' although funnily enough when the track 'The Final Countdown' was released by Europe, they were all over it like a rash. How wonderful it was to see young musicians with such foresight and wisdom etc., oh well ...”Guitarist/vocalist Nick Brent explains the meaning behind “The Prophet” in more detail: “Blimey, you could write a thesis on this one! In brief, the song 'The Prophet' describes the persecution of anyone who dares to publicly highlight the injustices inherent in long established organisations, religious or otherwise, or society as a whole. We used the Christian metaphor as the 'Christ' figure is apparent in most religions going back through the ages, representing the need for change when stagnation and decay in society lead to the oppression of sections of the population by the 'Chosen Few'. The ending - 'But why do you still smile?' - echoes both the insecurity of the status quo and the optimism that change can happen.” Quite an intellectual and interesting concept, no doubt about that.The original cover artwork implies that there might have been an anti-war message involved as well, which Nick confirms. “So the artwork is self explanatory now eh?”, he asks. And adds: “As children who grew up through the cold war with the threat of 'The Bomb', 'The Four Minute Warning', the Vietnam War, Trident etc., and the counter culture of the hippie movement, Greenham Common, Ban the Bomb marches et al, the threat of war was/is a constant in our lives. The human race's seemingly insatiable appetite for all things destructive is, fortunately, matched by a huge capacity for compassion, tolerance and understanding. The battle between good and evil is a constant in our lives.”The most unusual number on “The Prophet” is without a doubt the cover of “Day Tripper” by the Beatles. “I can't remember whose idea it was”, reflects Steve Grainger. “Definitely not because we were running short of material, our biggest headache was what to leave off the album. With hindsight perhaps we wouild not have used the track on the album as it doesn’t seem to sit right amongst the other tracks, but at the time we decided to include it. It is a yardstick to judge us by if you like - a song that everyone knows given the Apocalypse/Omega treatment. We like doing stuff like that. To be honest, most of the actual guitar riff would never have come from McCartney but we wouldn't have written a song like that. But put together, I reckon we added to it.”After the release of the album Omega were desperately looking for a tour as Steve remembers: “We had a few leads in that direction. But … in those days getting on tour as a support act to a bigger named band cost money … you know … the old handful of dosh in an envelope sort of thing. We even got given a price. 25 grand! That's £25,000, in those days a shed load of money. It only cost two or three grand to do the recording. Either way, Rock Machine wouldn't cough up the money so we were effectively stuffed. We were by then a bit too big for the smaller London pubs and clubs but not big enough for the bigger London venues, hence we did most of our London gigs at the Marquee, either as support to such bands as Pendragon, Rock Goddess, Clive Burr's Escape, (they were in effect Praying Mantis in all but name) or as a headline act ourselves.”Unfortunately, “The Prophet” remained Omega's one and only album: “We still had loads of material but without reasonable record company backing we didn't have the means to go back into the studio again. It was only later on with the reforming of Apocalypse that we had our own studio set up and could muck about with all the ideas we'd had, but Nick had gone off to concentrate on other projects and I was working with other songwriters. Mind you, it has to be said that the talk of of new songs has often been bandied around between me and Nick. Sadly, the passing of Dave Robertson was a bitter blow to us and it seemed like that was the end of it all. Who knows, our original bass player Mex may well have the time to get involved in a new project, as you may know he played some stuff on the 'Abandon Hope' album. So there you go. Never say never … it might happen yet!”"
    $19.00
  • Remastered digipak with 2 bonus tracks."I have to thank Metal Mind Productions for helping to complete my Tank battalion. Still not full, they have given me another soldier in the relentless metal army that is the group Tank. With the re-release of Still At War, you will have 13 more reasons to wonder why this band was not more popular. Not only do you get the 11 tracks from the original disc remastered, Metal Mind has also included a couple songs that only showed up on the Japanese version of this album.With the tenacity of a snarling pit bull, Tank grabs a hold of you and shakes you with a heavy metal ferocity that will make you tremble before these masters of genre. The duel guitar attack of Mick Trucker and Cliff Evans once again threatens to peel the skin with a blistering array of metal riffs designed to destroy anything that stands in their path. Anthem like rockers roll of their fingers with such ease it becomes a virtual heavy metal assault on the senses. This is an unrelenting piece of work that is designed for maximum enjoyment at the highest volume you can possibly stand.Still At War is a great dose of the metal medicine that will remedy what ails you. They may not be as well known as some acts but this album certainly proves they are as good as many who have become household names. Do yourself a favor and unleash your inner metalhead with this terrific disc!" - Sea Of Tranquility
    $11.00
  • 24 bit gold disc digipak remaster. Limited to 2000 copies. Here is the record label hype: "Tröjan was formed in 1982 in Wigan, England by guitarist Pete Wadeson and gathered musicians known from bands such as Taliön or Betrayed. The band, alongside groups such as Jaguar or Satan, was a worthy representative of the speed-metal genre, proving that not only Germany had a strong line-up in the terms of fast and powerful metal music. Their debut album, "Chasing the Storm", which released in 1985 had the misfortune of emerging during the hostile times for metal in the UK. Tired with being flooded by countless new NWOBHM releases, the British music industry despised debuting speed/power metal acts, what unfortunately also affected Tröjan. Thus the band was unfairly ignored in England, however the rest of Europe proved to be more welcoming. In 1983, the mentioned before groups Jaguar and Satan stormed the continent, becoming a huge success. Nevertheless, by 1985 and Tröjan's debut Roadrunner release, the industry grew much more fonder of the thrash metal scene, leaving speed metal giants such as Exciter less effective than few years earlier. "Chasing the Storm" has pretty much the same structure as most of Exciter's albums, but in the same time revealing its own unique style. Limited to only one guitar (which by that time was considered a major risk) Tröjan managed to develop an impressive musical structure, based mainly on Wadeson's skillful guitar play and intense vocals performed by Wyatt. All ten tracks on the album are pure speed-metal classics, with the highlighted "Icehouse", being itself a quintessence of the entire genre. After their debut the band dissolved, with the musicians focusing on other projects, none of which receiving proper acclaim as well. Today, Tröjan remains one of those underestimated speed-metal gems, waiting to be discovered by patient and demanding music connoisseurs."
    $16.00
  • "Metal Mind Productions once again gives you a chance to capture Algy Ward and the boys from Tank in case you missed them the first time around. For those that remember the glory days of British metal, this is a band that is very near and dear. For those that are newcomers to the Tank invasion, the live disc offered here is a great place to enlist in the Tank army.Taken from a live concert in Germany in August of 1997, the eight live tracks on here show all the power and might of one of the great early metal pioneers. In a live setting, they are just a rolling battalion of heavy metal fury.As the crowd starts chanting to open the album, it takes little imagination to think you are there in the middle of this heavy metal brigade, ready to bang heads with those that are near. When the band fires into the classic "This Means War", please make sure that you are in a safe location for continuous noggin bumping as from this point to the end of the disc, there is little let up from the ferocity of the Tank attack!Once again there is a glorious opportunity to hear one of the most underrated bands and to hear them loud and proud on stage delivering one blistering performance. Not only that, Metal Mind gives you a bonus of two studio tracks! Do the metal head in you a favor and pick up this disc. Your sore neck will tell you it is well worth the price." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $11.00
  • Remastered digipak with 10 bonus tracks."These guys may not be the most widely known metal band in the world and for that matter, I cannot call them the best but they are a highly entertaining group that gives you 100% every time out and that is very evident on this live disc where they get a chance to crank it out before an audience. You can tell that the band is in its element on stage as each song is pumped to maxim speed and vocalist Algy Ward had me checking to see if I had slipped in a Motorhead disc by mistake. Still this is not what I would call a stand out disc by any means. It is a good slice of the Tank pie but a very mixed bag at best.This album shows the band in all their heavy metal glory. Guitarist Pete Brabbs pulls out all the stops and delivers some terrific work but after awhile it seems that they are treading on all too familiar ground. There is a sameness to the music that makes most of the disc one that will gather a layer of dust before you decide to pull it out for another spin.There are some very good moments on the album but overall this is one that is for the Tank fanatics only.Metal Mind has as usual packed the disc with bonus tracks and added songs. This time they include some very unnecessary demos and four additional live tracks taken from a concert recorded roughly a year later. The main complaint is the repetition. There is really no reason for three versions of the song "Blood, Guts and Beer"!While I have enjoyed most of the re-releases of the Tank catalogue, this one is not on the must have list. It is a decent album but that is the best that I can give it. These guys have done much better work and I would have to say that you might want to look elsewhere for you dose of Tank." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $11.00