Madmen & Sinners featuring James LaBrie

PERHAPS THE BEST $5 CD YOU WILL EVER BUY. Superb new progressive metal project put together by noted fretless guitarist Tim Donahue. He decided to go right to the top and put together a collaboration with Dream Theater's James LaBrie. LaBrie brought monster drummer Mike Mangini into the fold. In addition to fretless guitar (you have to hear it to believe it), Donahue plays all bass and keyboard parts. This is classy, epic progressive metal done right. Highly recommended!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
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0
I'll second Ken's recommendation. This album is quite good, especially if you enjoy Labrie's singing. It is a no-brainer at 5 bucks.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
I'll third it! :-) A GREAT album.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
I'm gonna go against the grain and say I was disappointed with this--yes, even at 5 dollars. Some of the guitar work is interesting but, as an entire album, it doesn't stand up. The song writing just isn't there yet. If you're looking for something original, this probably isn't the way to go--if you're looking for standard prog-metal that’s cheap, take a shot.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Totally agree with the last reviewer - have to say this album sucks a bit. I purchased it when it was about 8 bucks and still thought it was a waste of dosh. Totally against the grain as this album has recieved rave reviews. Agreed that LaBrie is ok but the guitar sound is boring after a while whilst the song structures and content are second rate. At 5 bucks you can afford to take a chance but you can't take away the fact this is below average prog-metal. For me, I'd recommed saving your hard earned money and put it towards any of this years other great albums i.e Transmission, Spheric Universe Experience, Thought Chamber. sc
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Not really prog but full of metal riff, also full of ballads and plenty of awesome melody who thick in my head. A really great discovery for me. Louis-Philippe Chabot
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
One would think that having Labrie on board would be a guaranty...it´s not. A. Gallegos, Costa Rica.
Sun, 2010-08-08 22:37
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0
This is the worst five dollar cd you will ever buy. Song writting is horrid, James sounds off and the music is just noise. Laser's Edge, what were you thinking ? Don't wast your time or money..
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
I'll second Ken's recommendation. This album is quite good, especially if you enjoy Labrie's singing. It is a no-brainer at 5 bucks.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
I'll third it! :-) A GREAT album.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
I'm gonna go against the grain and say I was disappointed with this--yes, even at 5 dollars. Some of the guitar work is interesting but, as an entire album, it doesn't stand up. The song writing just isn't there yet. If you're looking for something original, this probably isn't the way to go--if you're looking for standard prog-metal that’s cheap, take a shot.
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Totally agree with the last reviewer - have to say this album sucks a bit. I purchased it when it was about 8 bucks and still thought it was a waste of dosh. Totally against the grain as this album has recieved rave reviews. Agreed that LaBrie is ok but the guitar sound is boring after a while whilst the song structures and content are second rate. At 5 bucks you can afford to take a chance but you can't take away the fact this is below average prog-metal. For me, I'd recommed saving your hard earned money and put it towards any of this years other great albums i.e Transmission, Spheric Universe Experience, Thought Chamber. sc
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
Not really prog but full of metal riff, also full of ballads and plenty of awesome melody who thick in my head. A really great discovery for me. Louis-Philippe Chabot
Tue, 2010-06-08 09:56
Rate: 
0
One would think that having Labrie on board would be a guaranty...it´s not. A. Gallegos, Costa Rica.
Sun, 2010-08-08 22:37
Rate: 
0
This is the worst five dollar cd you will ever buy. Song writting is horrid, James sounds off and the music is just noise. Laser's Edge, what were you thinking ? Don't wast your time or money..
You must login or register to post reviews.
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