New Views

SKU: SIREENA 2106
Label:
Sireena Records
Category:
Progressive Rock
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New reissue of the long out of print first album from this Swedish band.  This was originally released in 1984.  Tribute made four albums - the later two finds them hooking up with Pierre Moerlen.  New Views is instrumental symphonic rock highly influenced by the the melodic side of prog. Mike Oldfield is an obvious influence as is Camel.  Layers of female voice is used as an instrument evoking the spirit of Incantations.  The real highlight is the near 22 minute title piece.  Highly recommended.

Product Review

Thu, 2013-01-31 19:00
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Tribute actually played at my high school in Sweden in 1985. It was probably the moment that opened my eyes to this kind of music. An absolutely mind blowing experience..... The vinyl was purchased after the show, naturally autographed by all band members. This cd will be bought ASAP. I recommend this highly to all fans of symphonic / progressive music. Brilliant stuff indeed.
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Product Review

Thu, 2013-01-31 19:00
Rate: 
0
Tribute actually played at my high school in Sweden in 1985. It was probably the moment that opened my eyes to this kind of music. An absolutely mind blowing experience..... The vinyl was purchased after the show, naturally autographed by all band members. This cd will be bought ASAP. I recommend this highly to all fans of symphonic / progressive music. Brilliant stuff indeed.
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