Nine Paths

SKU: LE1061
Label:
The Laser's Edge
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Nine Paths is the fourth album from respected Dutch band Knight Area. They have garnered attention around the world, performing in North America multiple times as well as tours through out Europe. Knight Area has performed at NEARfest in the US as well as The Night Of The Prog festival in Loreley, Germany.



Not content to simply stick to a musical formula, Knight Area will surprise their fanbase with Nine Paths. While remaining firmly faithful to the symphonic rock tradition, the band has gone one step further and added a harder edge to their sound. This transformation comes courtesy of noted producer Neil Kernon (Cannibal Corpse, Queensryche, Nile) who’s mix has provided a more contemporary approach to progressive rock. The track “Please Come Home” features a guest vocal appearance by Charlotte Wessels (Delain). The music of Nine Paths is perfectly complemented by the fantasy art of Dennis Sibeijn at Damn Engine


"Knight Area's fourth release, Nine Paths, is simply a great sounding album of melodic progressive rock. Earlier works were likely gathered under the symphonic rock genre also. But Nine Paths seems to find Knight Area upping the rock ante just a bit. With that said, don't think that founder, composer, and keyboardist Gerben Klazinga is not offering an abundance of his synthesizer finesse. Yet you'll notice an emphasis on straight melodic rock in Clueless, where prog nuances have been vacated. Even the instrumental Pride and Joy sounds more like a rock tune, even though keyboards and guitar get into some serious duets and dueling. Perhaps the clearest representation of melodic rock (also with some symphonic notes) is the incredible ballad Please Come Home, where Mark Smit is joined by Charlotte Wessels (Delain) in a brilliant duet. Yet, those rock notes arise in segments within other tracks as in the latter half of Summerland or with larger sound created by big riffs over synths in the heart of The Balance.
Fundamentally, Nine Paths is melodic progressive rock. The opener Ever Since You Killed Me looms large in both progression and instrumentation. Later, The Balance, Wakerun, and Angel's Call offer more flashes of ingenuity than some bands can offer over several albums. One overarching element amidst these three is the impressive bass line within each. Next most notable is the satisfying drum work, as within Wakerun around four minutes where it the movement with near atmospheric color. It also introduces a heavier part of the song, advancing again that greater emphasis on a rock edge.


In the end, as said earlier, Nine Paths simply sounds great. The musical canvas is large and Knight Area fills it with color and imagination to entertaining effect. Nine Paths is a must have for fans of melodic progressive rock. Strongly recommended." 5.0/5.0 - Danger Dog.com

Product Review

Fri, 2011-10-21 16:23
Rate: 
0
I dont know what the problem is with this band for me, This is their 5th cd which I have all 5. IMO their First cd was a Classic release for me ..Every cd after that seemed to lose my interest,,, cd after cd.. With the new one, After 3 tracks I stopped it because I just could not get into it any more....Maybe after a few weeks Ill try again.... but I said that with their other releases,, I never went back sorry Just being honest....R.Ricci
Mon, 2011-10-24 11:37
Rate: 
0
It was not whether, but when the Dutch band Knight Area would make a good step forward. After three acclaimed albums, it was time the band would renew and thereby show that they're serious about their commitment to make each album better. With 'Nine Paths' the band has gone the right way... The opening track 'Ever Since You Killed Me' captures the listener from the first tones. Sturdy and quiet sections follow one another without a hitch in this nearly 10-minute composition. The song sets the tone for an album full of varied progressive rock. For the first time not all the music is written by keyboardist Gerben Klazinga. Gijs Koopman delivered with 'The River' a little masterpiece, which also can be said of Angel's call, a song written by Mark Smit. Most notable track is surely 'The Balance'. The first three minutes are sampled, to be followed by a stunning finale. 'Nine Paths' shows the progress of Knight Area in every way. The compositions are strong and all the band members seemed to have increased the bond with their instruments. The keyboard parts by Gerben Klazinga are very strong, Mark Vermeule (guitars) excels as never before, the bass tones of Gijs Koopman come to full advantage and Pieter van Hoorn's strikes on the drums form a solid surface. Really notable on Nine Paths are the strong vocals of Mark Smith. He seems to have more skills, is more daring, and shows more feelings in his voice. Nine Paths is in every aspect better than its predecessor. While 'Realm of Shadows' sometimes was too bombastic and even sounded occasionally forced, 'Nine Paths' is a one-piece album that will be better every time you listen to it. Highly recommended!
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Product Review

Fri, 2011-10-21 16:23
Rate: 
0
I dont know what the problem is with this band for me, This is their 5th cd which I have all 5. IMO their First cd was a Classic release for me ..Every cd after that seemed to lose my interest,,, cd after cd.. With the new one, After 3 tracks I stopped it because I just could not get into it any more....Maybe after a few weeks Ill try again.... but I said that with their other releases,, I never went back sorry Just being honest....R.Ricci
Mon, 2011-10-24 11:37
Rate: 
0
It was not whether, but when the Dutch band Knight Area would make a good step forward. After three acclaimed albums, it was time the band would renew and thereby show that they're serious about their commitment to make each album better. With 'Nine Paths' the band has gone the right way... The opening track 'Ever Since You Killed Me' captures the listener from the first tones. Sturdy and quiet sections follow one another without a hitch in this nearly 10-minute composition. The song sets the tone for an album full of varied progressive rock. For the first time not all the music is written by keyboardist Gerben Klazinga. Gijs Koopman delivered with 'The River' a little masterpiece, which also can be said of Angel's call, a song written by Mark Smit. Most notable track is surely 'The Balance'. The first three minutes are sampled, to be followed by a stunning finale. 'Nine Paths' shows the progress of Knight Area in every way. The compositions are strong and all the band members seemed to have increased the bond with their instruments. The keyboard parts by Gerben Klazinga are very strong, Mark Vermeule (guitars) excels as never before, the bass tones of Gijs Koopman come to full advantage and Pieter van Hoorn's strikes on the drums form a solid surface. Really notable on Nine Paths are the strong vocals of Mark Smith. He seems to have more skills, is more daring, and shows more feelings in his voice. Nine Paths is in every aspect better than its predecessor. While 'Realm of Shadows' sometimes was too bombastic and even sounded occasionally forced, 'Nine Paths' is a one-piece album that will be better every time you listen to it. Highly recommended!
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