Parallels (2CD/DVD Expanded Edition)

Newly remastered set includes a bonus disc with a live recording at the The Palace in Hollywood from 1/23/92. Also included is pre-production demos. To sweeten the pot Metal Blade includes a DVD witha complete gig from New Haven, Ct on 2/13/92 as well as a "making of Parallels" documentary and 2 video clips. Cheap too!!

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Fates Warning and Prog Metal fans in general: don't hesitate in getting this. The remaster sounds a bit crispier and brighter compared to the original release. The live material itself is worth it. The documentary gives a great insight on what Parallels meant to the band. Some other interesting facts are revealed by Jim and band mates as well. This was FW most successful album commercially speaking, but for some reason it just didn't take off as expected by everybody. Great hooks, great melodies, great music...Recommended! OQ
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:52
Rate: 
0
Fates Warning and Prog Metal fans in general: don't hesitate in getting this. The remaster sounds a bit crispier and brighter compared to the original release. The live material itself is worth it. The documentary gives a great insight on what Parallels meant to the band. Some other interesting facts are revealed by Jim and band mates as well. This was FW most successful album commercially speaking, but for some reason it just didn't take off as expected by everybody. Great hooks, great melodies, great music...Recommended! OQ
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