In The Present: Live From Lyon (2CD/DVD)

Double live CD set with a bonus DVD. Recorded in Lyon, France on 12/1/09. This is the reconstituted lineup featuring Benoit David on vocals and Oliver Wakeman on keys. The DVD is a mix of documentary and live footage.

Product Review

Tue, 2011-12-13 10:25
Rate: 
0
The dvd is a little bit disappointing,but the cd's are excellent,great sound & performances throughout. No sound of Benoit singing out of tune here either.
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Product Review

Tue, 2011-12-13 10:25
Rate: 
0
The dvd is a little bit disappointing,but the cd's are excellent,great sound & performances throughout. No sound of Benoit singing out of tune here either.
You must login or register to post reviews.
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