Pronto Viviremos Un Mundo Mucho Mejor

Pronto Viviremos Un Mundo Mucho Mejor

BY Flippers, Los

(Customer Reviews)
$9.00
$ 5.40
SKU: GUESS023
Label:
Guerssen Records
Category:
Psychedelic
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"One of Colombia's better known 60's & 70's groups is Los Flippers. But few people outside Colombia knows about this wonderful 1973 album they did. It's probably because it was self- released by their leader Arturo Astudillo's own label rather than the bigger labels they used before, hence low sales. But in any case, it's no doubt a great album that must be heard.

The music on this album is quite special, as it blends psychedelia with progressive sound and soul as well. With a very good production, here we find Los Flippers at their peak of inspiration and being now a bunch of very experimented musicians. The result is much more mature than any of their previous works of course, and they really achieved a sound that ranges with any supergroup.

With all original compositions except a Buddy Miles cover, they used a good dose of psychedelic effects and some tasty horns as well. As an addition, this first ever reissue comes with a killer bonus track from an earlier 45, with a killer sound reminiscent of Iron Butterfly.

Remastered sound from tapes (except the bonus track), and insert with liners by Arturo Astudillo."

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