Quipu

SKU: PARALL020CD
Label:
Parallax Sounds
Category:
Progressive Rock
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We don't typically stock CDs by individual artists unless they are extremely well known.  Brian Ellis is of interest to us because he happens to be the guitarist for Astra, a band very important around these parts.  It also happens that this is one slammin' disc.  Ellis is obviously a talented multi-instrumentalist.  Compositionally its a bit of a jumble but in this case in a very good way.  He wears his influences on his sleeve and replicates the sounds of the 70s: kosmigroov Miles Davis, blistering Mahavishnu fusion, and topped off with a visit to Kobia.  Quite a clever achievement and highly recommended.

"Brian Ellis is an multi-instrumentalist from San Diego, California. He has released several albums in the last few years under multiple monikers and is perhaps better known as lead guitarist for the progressive rock group, ASTRA.

By playing guitar, bass, drums, various synthesizers and keyboards, saxophone, trumpet, sitar, xylophone, kalimba, etc., Brian creates the illusion of a large live band jamming all together. After releasing 2 albums in 2007 for the now defunct Scottish electronic label, Benbecula Records, Brian found himself straying away from the programmed/sequenced elements and wanted to make an album where all the instruments were played live. The album was completed in early 2008 and was set to be the follow up to "The Silver Creature". Unfortunately, Benbecula decided to close it's doors at this time and the album was shelved.

"Quipu" takes Brian Ellis' jazz/fusion/funk sound from his previous solo works to the next level. The opening track "Birth" sets a deep atmosphere of delayed trumpets and saxophones with a slow beat and funky bass before exploding into an odd-timing heavy fusion workout harkening back to the days of Mahavishnu Orchestra. Whereas later tracks like "Psaw" (featuring David Hurley of Astra on drums) take on much more of a free jazz sound similar to Miles Davis "Bitches Brew" era, full of dissonance and surprising elements. The final track "Walomendem" is a 14 minute progressive rock epic hailing as a tribute to the great french band Magma."

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