Realms Of Eternity

SKU: 27770927869
Label:
Syzygy Music
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Third album from this talented Ohio based band arrives with some twists. They have enlisted Yngwie Malmsteen vocalist Mark Boals (kind of a wild card pick) and there is a definite Christian slant to the lyrics. My tolerance for bible thumpin' is pretty low. Syzygy comes close to the threshold but don't cross it - I guess because the music is so strong. The linchpin of the band is guitarist Carl Baldassarre who continues to be quite tasteful. He can get crunchy and heavy but displays roots in classical guitar. Have no fear - there is plenty of instrumental symphonic rock firepower as in the past. Oh yeah lots of tuneage here - over 77 minutes.

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