Relayer (CD/DVD-A)

SKU: GYRSP50096
Label:
Panegyric
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Of all the Yes albums that needed a remix this is the one that needed it the most!

"Relayer (1974) is the third in a series of remixed and expanded Yes albums.

Presented as a double digi-pack format in a slipcase with booklet featuring new sleeve notes by Sid Smith, along with rare photos and archive material, the album has been remixed into stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound from the original studio masters by Steven Wilson and is fully approved by Yes.

The DVDA also contains the original album mix in high-resolution, and a complete alternate album running order drawn from demos/studio run-throughs

Restored artwork approved by Roger Dean, the release of which coincides with the 40th anniversary of the album’s original late 1974 appearance."

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