Riah Sahiltaahk (CD-EP)

SKU: JV570045
Label:
Jazz Village
Category:
Zeuhl
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The original version of Rïah Sahïltaahk that was recorded in 1971 is featured on the album 1001° Centigrade (vol. 2). But at the time, its composer, Christian Vander, was unhappy with the arrangement written by the group. This radically new version, adapted to suit the group’s current line-up, is more faithful to the spirit of Magma’s music and its uniquely weird and wonderful prog-rock style."

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  • Its been quite a long time since we've heard from Magic Pie.  They went through lots of trials and tribulations getting this album finished but now its finally arrived.  If you are not familiar with this band here's the deal: Magic Pie are a Norwegian band with a retro 70s sound.  The music is a bit of a high wire act balancing the neo-prog sounds of The Flower Kings with the heavier elements of classic Uriah Heep.  They also seem to be the darlings of Rosfest having played there multiple times."It's hard to believe it's been 10 years since these proggers from Norway released their promising debut "Motions of Desire". At that time, their music struck me as an enthusiastic combination of classic prog and classic hard rock. (Think Deep Purple for the hard rock side of that equation.) At their best, they offered memorable passages and pieces that sounded like they very well could have been long lost recordings from many years ago. At their worst, they sometimes fell short of filling the big shoes of the legendary bands whose music they strove to emulate. That's actually not bad for a debut album from a new prog band. I found much to like and looked forward to hearing from them again in the future.Checking back in on them a decade later, I must say that I am very impressed with how they have developed and matured. No longer do I get the feeling that certain sections of songs are direct homages to any particular band from any one particular decade of prog's illustrious history. Their influences, while still very present and valid, are now more varied, including a greater percentage of modern reference points. More importantly, their influences are just that--merely influences rather than templates or even primary reference points.The sound quality on "King for a Day" is superb thanks in large part to the enlistment of sonic genius Rich Mouser (whose resume includes similar work for prominent contemporaries like Spock's Beard, Transatlantic and Dream Theater).Keyboardist Erling Hananger is an excellent addition to Magic Pie's recipe. His keyboard parts are expressive, dynamic and integral to the music. When appropriate, his leads seamlessly blend, harmonize, and work synergistically with electric guitar.The lyrics have a melodramatic and somewhat tragic flair this time around, but this is prog so you should be accustomed to the musical ride including a few tragic tales from time to time by now, right?OK ' so it's time for the "magic" question... A decade after their debut album, how has my impression of Magic Pie changed?On "King for a Day", I now hear a band which has found "its own voice", one that resonates confidently in the space somewhere between classic arena rock of yesteryear (on prog-steroids of course) and modern melodic prog of the 21st Century (like Spock's Beard and The Flower Kings). Add a few dashes of modern prog-metal to taste and you, my friend, have baked up a very nice confection indeed... MAGIC PIE!If you love modern prog anthems with big harmonies and 'sing along' choruses, give "King for a Day" a listen! I'm glad I did!" - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • This album compiles and releases for the very first time all of the studio recordings (as well as two live recordings) made by guitarist and composer Kerry Livgren with the 2nd edition of Kansas, a seven-piece band that immediately preceded the formation of the lineup of the band that the world knows as Kansas. These recordings present a different and fascinating contrast to the music that Kerry would develop and release upon the world with Kansas just a couple of years later. Yet, as composer of all the tracks here, they still have his obvious imprint. In fact, two of the songs here would later reappear in different versions on Kansas' albums; Belexes would show up on the band's self-titled debut album, while Incomudro would appear on their 2nd album, Song For America. With dual keyboards (one of whom doubled on reeds) and an electric saxist/flautist featured in addition to the more standard rock instrumentation, the sound is obviously influenced by jazz/rock pioneers such as Don Ellis, Soft Machine and Frank Zappa and The Mothers Of Invention as well as early progressive rock bands such as Van Der Graaf Generator and King Crimson. Early Recordings From Kansas 1971-73 is an exciting archival release of dark and exploratory early American progressive rock. The fact that these musicians were not able to find success while making this adventurous music in the heartland of agricultural America over 30 years ago should not be a surprise, but the fact that the tapes have survived and are able to finally be presented to the world in an authorized form will give fans of Kansas as well as all fans of early progressive rock a very pleasant surprise. These recordings have been licensed from, and released with the full consent and agreement of all the musicians. Kerry Livgren has returned to the original tapes and worked on all tracks in his studio to present this material in the best possible light. He also contributed liner notes and provided archival photographs.
    $13.00
  • "Never say Casey Crescenzo lacks ambition. If this guy had been in the control room for NASA’s lunar mission, he would’ve been griping about how we weren’t thinking “big” enough. The Providence-based songwriter is the self-styled Proust of prog rock. If he’s so vain, it’s because the song is about him, though what it’s really about is the aporia of existence and the cyclical nature of life, etc., etc.Restraint might not be Crescenzo’s strong suit, and he’s probably not moving any records with his sense of humor. But six albums into his career as The Dear Hunter, he’s right where he feels most comfortable: in the middle of an epic album cycle that explores the birth, life, and eventual death of his navel-gazing nom de guerre.When we last left off in summer 2009, The Dear Hunter’s overarching narrative had just reached the conclusion of Act III. That’s three full albums dedicated to the convoluted story of a boy who comes of age in the early years of the 20th century, with three more still to go. Before picking up with Act IV, however, Crescenzo stepped away from his magnum opus to focus on writing another concept project, a series of nine EPs about the color spectrum. Some musicians choose cocaine as their preferred drug. Crescenzo might be the first to develop a genuine addiction to big-picture rock records. Even 2013’s Migrant, the first non-conceptual album in the Dear Hunter catalog, feels like a grandiose production. Crescenzo described it as a “slightly more stripped-down” record, but that’s like calling a humpback slightly smaller than a blue whale.Whether you love or loathe The Dear Hunter will likely depend on factors bigger than one album, or even six. Like The Mars Volta, Coheed and Cambria, and other modern acts that fly the prog flag, this isn’t a band for those who seek out rock music for its simple, visceral pleasures. The stakes on a Dear Hunter record are high as heaven, and Crescenzo genuinely sounds like he’s trying to squeeze more out of his talents with each outing.This much holds true on Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise, the long-awaited continuation of the six-album concept series that began in 2006. If the complexity of Crescenzo’s songwriting has grown by leaps and bounds over the past decade, so has his fans’ eagerness to extract a coherent story from his lyrics. Online forums overflow with musings on The Dear Hunter’s hero (or anti-hero — we’re never quite sure), and it seems the band’s mythos has benefited from the internet culture it has evolved alongside.All of this obscures the fact that Crescenzo is far more interesting as a musician than as a lyricist. His “story” is too often hindered by vague, flowery language and one-dimensional characters saddled with names like Ms. Terri and Ms. Leading (get it!?). We’ll leave the more narrative aspects of Act IV to annotation sites, which seem to have been made for highly textual bands like The Dear Hunter. Suffice it to say there’s some batshit stuff going on here, though much of what happens in the protagonist’s story is rooted in Crescenzo’s own life. Here’s the dirty secret: Strip away the concept, and you’re not really losing all that much.As far as the actual music goes, Crescenzo has never sounded more willing to take chances. The results are sometimes strange, sometimes thrilling, and sometimes both. A title like Rebirth in Reprise suggests that repetition can be a cleansing or purifying act, but Crescenzo doesn’t sound like he’s moving in circles here. He throws the whole damn sink into opener “Rebirth”, which transitions from a choral invocation into a chamber waltz with a flick of the maestro’s wrist.Crescenzo enlisted Bay Area musicians the Awesöme Orchestra for this chapter of his tale, and he sure gets his money’s worth. They steal the show on “Rebirth” and lend a snappy, swinging rhythm to the epic centerpiece “A Night on the Town”, making it feel shorter than its interminable nine minutes. Aside from texture, the orchestral arrangements add a crucial sense of time and place. Act IV is supposed to take place in the early 20th century, and the horns especially evoke the Jazz Age. It’s a good look for The Dear Hunter, a band that’s always relied heavily on atmospheric elements but has never sounded as confident in their tools as they do here.In some ways, Act IV is the most ambitious entry in the series yet. It’s also among the more accessible. Tucked into all that prog silliness are some successful standalone pop songs. “Waves” is a pretty, contemplative rock ballad that takes its cues from the anthemic folk rock that’s blossomed in the years since Act III. The song’s soaring guitar line is reminiscent of Icelandic indie rockers Of Monsters and Men, and its lush production is typical of the genre. “The Squeaky Wheel” is more of a conventional piano rocker, but its subtle variations remain interesting throughout, and Crescenzo’s voice shines at the front of the mix.Other cross-genre stabs at pop accessibility don’t work out quite so well. “King of Swords (Reversed)” is powered by a disco beat that feels anachronistic at best and cheesy at worst. Not even Crescenzo has the power to bring disco back.In fact, the back half of Act IV — pretty much everything that follows the three-part continuation of “The Bitter Suite” — features more stumbles than outright triumphs. It’s most successful in its quiet moments, like the acoustic ballad “The Line”, which chronicles a relationship fading and fizzling. In this way, the song calls back to “Waves” and suggests that there’s something cyclical about the album’s sequencing. It’s too bad that “The Line” is followed by the murky “Wait”, whose existential lyrics (“Will I ever know heaven or hell/ Or is eternity something worse?”) want to hit hard but don’t carry the same immediacy as a simple love song. At moments like these, Crescenzo sounds like he’s merely playacting at profundity, or at least reading a little too much Nietzsche.For all of its many excesses, Act IV basically represents Crescenzo at the height of his powers, and fans will likely eat it up, digest it, regurgitate it, and sidle back up to the table for another helping. As for the uninitiated? That depends on the sensitivity of your bullshit meter. There will always be people who want more from rock music than music. They want literature, mystery, capital-M Meaning. They want the hand of God in the grooves of the vinyl. Crescenzo is fun because he’s down to take on that impossible role of savior. Whether it all amounts to a car crash or a meteor shower, give him this: We can’t look away." - Consequence Of Sound
    $14.00
  • New reworked edition of the band's first album - from back when they were originally known as Witsend.  This new version features remastered, resequenced tracks, bonus tracks, new artwork and liner notes.  It might have been their first album but it was certainly one of their best!  Highly recommended.
    $12.00
  • Third album from this excellent Norwegian band.  Arabs In Aspic is yet another prog band influenced by the sounds of the 70s.  Lots of similarities to Black Bonzo.  Vintage keyboard sounds and nice heavy-ish guitar leads.  Vocalist Rune Sundby of the 70s Norwegian band Ruphus guests.  That band would be a pretty good comparison but you can definitely hear undercurrents of Uriah Heep and Deep Purple but there is more going on here. On the longer, jammier tracks the music takes on the psychedelic feel of Echoes period Pink Floyd.  Beautifully done.  Highly recommended.
    $24.00
  • Now here's an album that kicks ass from start to finish. Easily going to be one of my favorite discs of the year. Venturia is a new French progressive metal band put together by guitarist Charly Sahona along with drummer Diego Rapacchietti. Charly found this incredible vocalist from New York named Marc Ferreira and paired him with Lydie Robin the band's female vocalist who primarily sings back up as well as the ocassional lead. Adagio's Kevin Codfert guests as the keyboardist. The New Kingdom is an impressive mix of phenomenal chops, infectious melodies and complexity. The closest comparison I can think of is Arabesque. A tune like "Words Of Silence" crushes but at the same time it's hook laden and will stay with you for days. Lydie Robin has a breathy gorgeous voice that works blends well with Ferreira. Venturia are to be applauded - they drew from a variety of different inspirations and put together something really fresh. Highest recommendation - I love this disc. Top 10 candidate.
    $14.00
  • "Get All You Deserve is a high-definition 4 disc audio-visual set from Steven Wilson.Directed by long-time visual collaborator Lasse Hoile, Get All You Deserve was filmed in Mexico City during the recent Grace For Drowning Tour. The set captures the spectacular live experience that Wilson and Hoile created for the tour on Blu-ray, DVD and 2CD.Following the release of Grace For Drowning, Steven embarked on his first ever solo tour, assembling a virtuoso band, featuring Marco Minnemann (drums), Nick Beggs (bass), Theo Travis (flute and sax), Adam Holzman (keys) and Niko Tsonev (guitars), to accompany him. For the shows he worked extensively with Lasse to create a show unlike anything else he had attempted with his other bands, Porcupine Tree, Blackfield, No-Man or Bass Communion.The shows immersed fans in a rich sensory experience: rear speakers provide surround-sound effects, giant screens show off Lasse's films made specifically to accompany these songs, and cutting-edge lighting designs giving texture to each song.Get All You Deserve captures one of the key shows from the tour. Recorded at a sold-out Teatro Metropolitan in Mexico City, the gig features tracks from both Wilson's solo albums along with the new, as yet unreleased, track Luminol. " 
    $31.00
  • Fantastic live album recorded at Royal Albert Hall on December 12, 1969. This sat in the vaults until 1977 and came out a year before they regrouped for Octave. It's filled out with unreleased studio material, many of which were easily good enough to have made the albums (ie. "Long Summer Days").
    $11.00
  • "Nefertiti, the fourth album by Miles Davis' second classic quintet, continues the forward motion of Sorcerer, as the group settles into a low-key, exploratory groove, offering music with recognizable themes -- but themes that were deliberately dissonant, slightly unsettling even as they burrowed their way into the consciousness. In a sense, this is mood music, since, like on much of Sorcerer, the individual parts mesh in unpredictable ways, creating evocative, floating soundscapes. This music anticipates the free-fall, impressionistic work of In a Silent Way, yet it remains rooted in hard bop, particularly when the tempo is a bit sprightly, as on "Hand Jive." Yet even when the instrumentalists and soloists are placed in the foreground -- such as Miles' extended opening solo on "Madness" or Hancock's long solo toward the end of the piece -- this never feels like showcases for virtuosity, the way some showboating hard bop can, though each player shines. What's impressive, like on all of this quintet's sessions, is the interplay, how the musicians follow an unpredictable path as a unit, turning in music that is always searching, always provocative, and never boring. Perhaps Nefertiti's charms are a little more subtle than those of its predecessors, but that makes it intriguing. Besides, this album so clearly points the way to fusion, while remaining acoustic, that it may force listeners on either side of the fence into another direction." - All Music Guide
    $5.00
  • This is John Carpenter's first non-soundtrack album and its a killer.  Carpenter always provided the soundtracks to all his movies.  If you are a fan of Goblin or Fabio Frizzi this will blow your mind."The films of John Carpenter are perhaps best known for their atmospheric qualities. His horror classics are drenched in a level of darkness that owes a great deal to the films’ score. Who doesn’t immediately get chills down their spine when they hear the foreboding piano theme to Michael Myers in Halloween? These cult classics are almost universally recognizable. Few others have been able to achieve the kind of nostalgia and level of influence as Carpenter has in his almost half-a-century long career. The announcement that Sacred Bones Records were releasing an album’s worth of newly recorded stand-alone John Carpenter material not intended for any particular film score brought forth a unanimous level of excitement from fans of his previous work. Carpenter’s music has always played an integral role in what made his films so exciting.Lost Themes is a record that is immediately characteristic of the John Carpenter name. The title is actually a bit misleading, as these themes were not collected over the course of his career but recorded for fun during jam sessions with his son. Each of these nine tracks are separate themes and tell their own self contained story, but it is worth noting how complete and cohesive the album feels from start to finish. In a Pitchfork interview, Carpenter stated that he viewed the record as “a soundtrack for the movies that you have in your mind. Everybody walks around with a movie playing in their head. Just imagine this is the soundtrack for you.”From the opening piano chords of “Vortex” we are thrust into an ominous realm reminiscent of Carpenter’s ‘80s films. The song plays out as less Halloween inspired and more Escape from New York. He uses the same kind of progressions here that are present in his previous scores by letting the original melody to each theme transition to something entirely different before coming back full circle near the end. This only adds to the thrilling presence that dominates each of these themes. “Obsidian” utilizes this technique in a profound way. The soundscape unfolds from the background music of an eerie midnight drive through a dystopian metropolis into an organ driven chamber music style interlude. “Domain” serves as one of the most fun tracks here, somehow managing to be groovy and danceable yet still somewhat sinister in nature. Its synth arpeggios harken back to Carpenter classics such as “Pork Chop Express” from Big Trouble in Little China. “Mystery” boasts twinkly synths that evoke the classic science fiction nostalgia from films like Prince of Darkness or The Thing. “Abyss” moves in much the same fashion, with a neat rhythm progression near the end that further builds the tension the track begins on. Fans of Escape from New York’s ascending and descending synth patterns need look no further than the true gem of the record, “Purgatory” which builds from a quiet and dissonant opening minute into an ‘80’s style jazz laden groove.Lost Themes further cements John Carpenter’s legacy as a master composer. His music remains as relevant today as it was forty years ago. Carpenter brilliantly utilizes a plethora of musical influences in these nine tracks including ‘70s and ‘80s prog rock, synth rock, chamber music, disco, electronica, and hints of jazz fusion. Though we may not have any images to accompany these themes, what dwells within our minds could very well prove to be much more effective." - Sputnik Music
    $14.00
  • ‘Minstrel in the Gallery,’ Jethro Tull‘s eighth LP, is being remastered and expanded for its 40th birthday.The band’s fifth consecutive U.S. Top 10 album — and the last to feature the longtime lineup of Ian Anderson, Martin Barre, John Evans, Barrie Barlow and Jeffrey Hammond-Hammond — ‘Minstrel’ was originally released in September 1975, and spun off one single with the title track, which peaked at No. 80. The new edition, which supplants a previously available 2002 remaster, is being released on May 5 as a limited-edition two-CD / two-DVD set.The deluxe version, titled the ‘La Grande’ edition, adds seven bonus tracks (six of them previously unreleased) to the original album, including two mixed to 5.1 surround, and all to stereo by Steven Wilson, plus a flat transfer of the original LP mix at 96/24 and a flat transfer of the original quad mix, both of which include the B-side ‘Summerday Sands.’This edition, which is available for pre-order now, also includes an eight-minute film from 1975, featuring the band performing ‘Minstrel in the Gallery’ in Paris during July 1975, and adds a case-bound DVD book with an 80-page booklet featuring essays and photos as well as a series of track-by-track annotations by Anderson. For those who don’t have a ‘La Grande’ budget to match the deluxe pricing, ‘Minstrel’ will also be reissued digitally and on a single CD, as well as a 180-gram vinyl limited-edition pressing.Jethro Tull, ‘Minstrel in the Gallery’ 40th Anniversary La Grande Edition Track Listing:Disc One – New Steven Wilson Stereo Mix‘Minstrel in the Gallery’‘Cold Wind to Valhalla’‘Black Satin Dancer’‘Requiem’‘One White Duck / 010 = Nothing At All’‘Baker St. Muse’: a. ‘Pig-Me And The Whore’ b. ‘Nice Little Tune’ c. ‘Crash-Barrier Waltzer” d. ‘Mother England Reverie’‘Grace’‘Summerday Sands’‘Requiem’ (Version 1, previously unreleased)‘One White Duck’ (Take 5, previously unreleased)‘Grace’ (Take 2, previously unreleased)‘Minstrel in the Gallery’ (BBC version, previously unreleased)‘Cold Wind to Valhalla’ (BBC version, previously unreleased)‘Aqualung’ (BBC version, previously unreleased)Disc Two – Live at the Palais Des Sports, Paris, July 5, 1975 (A Jakko Jakszyk Stereo Mix)‘Introduction (The Beach Part 11)’‘Wind Up’‘Critique Oblique’‘Wond’ring Aloud’‘My God’: a. Flute Solo Including: ‘God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen/Bouree/Quartet’ b. ‘Living in the Past’ c. ‘My God’ (Reprise)‘Cross-Eyed Mary’‘Minstrel in the Gallery’‘Skating Away on the Thin Ice of the New Day’‘Bungle in the Jungle’‘Aqualung’Guitar Solo‘Back-Door Angels’‘Locomotive Breath’ with improvisation and including “Hard Headed English General” and “Back-Door Angels” (reprise)The DVDs  feature the DTS & DD 5.1 surround mixes as well as the 96/24 PCM stereo mix and and an eight and half minute film of the band recorded in Paris on 6th July 1975.
    $41.00
  • In 1974, Jethro Tull announced plans for WarChild, a multi-faceted project that was to encompass a feature-length film, a soundtrack album, as well a new album from the band. In October of that year, Tull released a 10-song album that would climb to #2 in the U.S. and the top 15 in the U.K., but the film and accompanying soundtrack were shelved. To commemorate the 40-year anniversary of this ambitious experiment, Parlophone revisits WarChild.WARCHILD: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY THEATRE EDITION will be available as a limited edition 2-CD/2-DVD set on November 25 2014.Highlights from the set include:- Original album and bonus tracks (three previously unreleased), remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- 10 orchestral pieces (nine previously unreleased) written for the film s soundtrack, 4 of which are remixed in 5.1 surround and stereo by Steven Wilson.- Flat transfers of the original LP mix at 96/24, and the quadrophonic version (with 2 bonus tracks) in 4.0.- The Third Hoorah promo footage, and footage from a January 1974 photo session/press conference where the WarChild project was announced.- An 80-page booklet featuring an extensive history of the project, a film script synopsis, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson, plus rare and unseen photographs.
    $45.00
  • "When Tosin Abasi released his debut solo album under the moniker ANIMALS AS LEADERS in 2009, few would have predicted the band’s meteoric rise to the apex of the progressive rock/metal world. Although Abasi earned acclaim as the lead guitarist in the Washington, D.C.-based metalcore act Reflux, it was still a long-shot that an instrumental album of progressive metal with jazz, electronic and ambient flourishes would develop anything more than a cult following.Fast-forward two-plus years to Weightless, the group’s sophomore effort, and ANIMALS AS LEADERS is revered worldwide as a trailblazing pioneer of modern heavy music. The group’s genre-defying compositions have earned extensive praise — Steve Vai called the band “the future of creative, heavy virtuoso guitar playing.” Guitar World Magazine also featured Abasi on the cover twice over the course of this album cycle, further cementing his legendary status within the current progressive scene.Now in 2014, ANIMALS AS LEADERS delivers what is quickly going to be hailed by fans and media alike as the group’s career defining release that will ultimately redefine the progressive world as we know it. This third full-length release is a bombastic, dynamic and innovative explosion incorporates elements spanning across the entire musical spectrum. It also marks the recording debut of drummer Matthew Garstka, whose technical proficiency and unique style allows Abasi and guitarist Javier Reyes the room to push their boundaries to previously unthinkable heights.Reyes states: “I think some of the new tracks are some of AAL’s strongest and musical material yet and extremely happy with how the album came out. Everyone who took part with this album (Misha Mansoor (Periphery), Adam Getgood (Periphery), Diego Farias (Volumes), and Navene Koperweis) is extremely talented and I think we’ve done a great job of capturing it onto what is now the third ANIMALS AS LEADERS album.”"
    $12.00
  • During its 13 year existence, Dutch band Solution has been constantly exploring various musical fields. Debuting as a freeform progressive combo with jazz influences, their music evolved into typical seventies freshly produced music - both vocal and instrumental.This 3CD-set is not just a bunch of Solution songs, it contains the complete studio recordings from a long remembered and much cherished Dutch group in their most successful era. Furthermore, this release adds several unique versions of songs to the four previously released studio-albums.Besides the first two EMI released albums and the Gus Dudgeon-produced Cordon Bleu and Fully Interlocking (released on Elton John’s Rocket label), Mythology includes previously unavailable CD-versions of the re-recorded 7”-only versions of Divergence and Chappaqua. As a bonus, several live-tracks - recorded in 1971 for VPRO radio and television - provide a look through the camera-eye, documenting the band on stage in their formative early years.The recordings have been exclusively remastered from the original mastertapes. In addition, this Mythology contains an informative booklet with the complete Solution 70s story and rare memorabilia.Track listingCDP-1108   3CD SOLUTION – MythologyCHAPTER 11. Trane Steps 10:202. Koan 7:503. Phases 12:174. Preview 0:585. Circus Circumstances 7:046. Jam 10:32 - live7. Koan 9:54 - live8. Theme 0:429. Divergence 5:5810. Concentration 12:30CHAPTER 21. Second Line 8:462. New Dimension 6:273. Fever 4:264. Divergence 3:45 – single version5. Chappaqua 10:356. Black Pearl 6:177. A Song For You 3:568. Last Detail 5:329. Whirligig 9:0210. Third Line 7:2411. Chappaqua 3:49 – single version12. Empty Faces 6:35CHAPTER 31. French Melodie 4:362. Carousel 7:183. Sonic Sea 7:214. Give Some More 5:255. Free Inside 6:216. Koan 9:34 - live7. Circus Circumstances 6:45 – live8. Divergence 5:49 – live9. Trane Steps 10:20 – live10. Empty Faces 4:24 – single version11. French Melodie 4:01 – single version12. Give Some More 4:51 – single versionCD1 tracks 6 – 7, CD3 tracks 6 - 9 previously unreleased live track / versions, VPRO Campus, 1971 
    $24.00