Seventh Star ($5 Special)

SKU: R2-25337
Label:
Warner Bros.
Category:
Hard Rock
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"An often misunderstood and underrated album, 1986's Seventh Star was never intended to be a Black Sabbath release, as the band had effectively broken up following its disastrous 1984 tour in support of career low point Born Again. Instead, Seventh Star was conceived as guitarist Tony Iommi's first solo project, and it was only record company pressure that forced him to resurrect his longtime band's moniker at the last minute. With this in mind, one can better appreciate both the record's more blues-based, often un-Sabbath-like songwriting and the contributions made by journeyman singer Glenn Hughes (ex-Trapeze, Deep Purple, etc.), whose incredibly emotive and soulful vocal style was completely at odds with the deadpan delivery of Sabbath's most recognizable singer, Ozzy Osbourne (a discrepancy that would spell his quick exit when the necessary classics were wheeled out for the ensuing world tour). Still, within the unique circumstances of Seventh Star's creation, Hughes' fiery tunefulness made aggressive hard rockers like "In for the Kill," "Turn to Stone," and "Danger Zone" uncommonly catchy, and gorgeous ballads such as "Angry Heart/In Memory..." and "No Stranger to Love" all the more heart-rending. Tellingly, his efforts fell resoundingly flat on the bluesy aimlessness of "Heart Like a Wheel" and the gothic menace of the title track, making it possible for keener observers to foresee the troubles ahead. Yet, in light of the even more traumatic difficulties that preceded it, Seventh Star -- for all its uncharacteristic sonic qualities -- actually represents the turning of a corner for Black Sabbath's lengthy career, which steadily regained momentum in the years that followed." - Allmusic Guide

Product Review

Citiboy
Fri, 2013-12-06 11:19
Rate: 
0
To Be Quite honest This cd is one of my Favs....T.Iommi Kicks on this.....
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Product Review

Citiboy
Fri, 2013-12-06 11:19
Rate: 
0
To Be Quite honest This cd is one of my Favs....T.Iommi Kicks on this.....
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    $15.00
  • Michael Romeo doesn't work quickly.  The man takes his time and a new Symphony X album is ready when its been honed to perfection.  Underworld is the first new album in four years.  To get to the point its ridiculously great.  Up through V, the band were the modern agents of neoclassical/symphonic metal.  With The Odyssey the band took a left turn with Russell Allen's vocals being more agressive and a pervasive overall crunchiness, heaviness to the sound.  Perhaps a bit less symphonic sounding.  With Underworld fans of the "old style" will smile once again.  The band has found a way to balance both sides of their sound.  Its heavy but extremely melodic.  Russell's vocals are spot on and Mr. Romeo's solos have an organic flow that will sweep you through the tune.  Its a beautiful marriage of styles - not too much of either direction that the band has exhibited in the past.  Toss in a theme built around Dante's Inferno and you've totally sucked me back in to the fold.  BUY OR DIE!"A lot has happened with New Jersey-based progressive metal band SYMPHONY X since the Iconoclast album was released four years ago. Singer ‘Sir’ Russell Allen recorded and toured behind several releases with ADRENALINE MOB, toured with TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA and recorded the album The Great Divide with ALLEN-LANDE. Bassist Mike Lepond toured with HELSTAR and released his excellent solo album under the name SILENT ASSASSINS. Keyboardist Michael Pinnella released a solo album and guitarist Michael Romeo made guest appearances on some albums. Drummer Jason Rullo battled and successfully recovered from heart failure in 2013.Four years later, SYMPHONY X delivers another fantastic album, the band sounding just as powerful as Iconoclast, and amazingly never missing a beat. Titled Underworld, it is sort of a concept album, loosely based on Dante’s epic poem Inferno. Dante’s Inferno is not a totally original topic in the metal world; ICED EARTH featured an epic song based on it on their 1995 album Burnt Offerings and SEPULTURA wrote a concept album based on it with 2006’s Dante XXI, while SYMPHONY X themselves included references to it on their 1997 album The Divine Wings Of Tragedy. Several other metal bands have also been influenced by the poem.SYMPHONY X do not follow the tale word for word, but use it more as an inspiration. Michael Romeo is quoted as saying that the album has a theme of “going to hell and back for something or someone you care about.” He also said that this album is more about “the song” instead of the album as a whole, allowing it to flow better from song to song. This doesn’t mean every song is an attempt at a single. Romeo’s intent when writing songs for Underworld was for people to be able to take in the whole album in one listening. (The total album length is just over an hour, compared to Iconoclast’s two discs that were around 83 minutes).To be honest, the last two SYMPHONY X albums, 2007’s Paradise Lost and 2011’s Iconoclast were my favorite albums released by the band so far. I refer to them as the “angry” SYMPHONY X, mainly due to Russell Allen’s vocal delivery and the aggressive music on those particular albums. So, I waited to see if we would get a third album in this same vein from SYMPHONY X. The songs on Underworld seem to alternate between prog and aggression, but for the most part, the album is not as “angry” as Iconoclast. The album strikes a perfect balance between prog and power. Some songs are aggressive without being “angry”. There are definitely more classic SYMPHONY X elements here than on recent releases.The album is much more accessible than previous albums. The songs overall are shorter (most clocking in at around the 5-6 minute mark), and more to the point than on previous albums. 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  • "After witnessing Swedish Heavy Metal quartet WOLF pull of a spectacular set whilst supporting EVILE at a local show in 2012 I have not looked back since. They are back and they mean business with their latest album “Devil Seed”, to say it’s loud is an understatement.WOLF proudly describe their music as “Real Metal For True Bastards” and in the couple of years I have been listening to these Swedish Metal heads I can wholeheartedly agree with this statement.“Overture In C Shark” and “Shark Attack” provides the listener with a very explosive opening to show us that the boys in WOLF are back and here to stay. The gloriously recognisable vocals provided by Niklas Stålvind only gives the listener more reassurance that it’s a triumphant return for WOLF.It’s very refreshing that WOLF deliver us that same Old School Heavy Metal sound; as I listen to “Devil Seed” I would say you are taken back to the days of IRON MAIDEN, JUDAS PRIEST and SAXON. A real treat for Heavy Metal fans whatever walk of life you come from.This record encompassed many great attributes including boundless guitar riffs and solos, mighty vocal work, miraculous melodies and crashing drums; exactly what you would expect from a Heavy Metal band. The tracks that I think demonstrate this exquisitely are “Surgeons Of Lobotomy”, “I Am Pain” and “River Everlost”. The melodies on these particular tracks stood out the most in my opinion. I also really enjoyed the iconic guitar riffs and solos on the track “River Everlost” so thank you Simon Johansson and Niklas Stålvind for those.The anthemic “Killing Floor” allows you one last chance for some killer Heavy Metal before drawing the album to a close.So overall a truly marvelous epidemic of Heavy Metal from WOLF in the form of “Devil Seed”, it’s a real treat for fans of the genre and the band." - Metal Temple
    $11.00
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