Shallow Life (2CD Deluxe Edition)

New 2 disc expanded edition of Shallow Life comes with a bonus disc with live tracks and b-side tunes and 2 new acoustic versions of "Spellbound" and "Closer".

There are no review yet. Be the first!

Product Review

You must login or register to post reviews.
Laser Pic

customers also bought

SEE ALL
  • Originally released in 1978, this was the band's second attempt at cracking the English speaking market. Like Follow My Dream, there is some extraordinary progressive rock going on here but you have to put up with Skrzek's intermittent vocals which are pretty drab. This set comes with extensive bonus tracks and has 24 bit remastering.
    $13.00
  • After the break up of art rock pioneers Orchestra Luna, guitarist Randy Roos changed gears and assembled the Mistral band. The resulting album, from 1978, features fusion stars Mike Stern, Neil Stubenhaus, Louis DeAndrade, and Alyrio Lima (Weather Report). Masterfully playing a variety of fretted and fretless guitars, Roos demonstrates why its time for this overlooked gem to be revisited. Mistral is pure high energy fusion that will appeal to fans of Jeff Beck and Return To Forever. It comes with liner notes from noted jazz journalist Bill Milkowski. Mistral has been remastered from the original analogue master tapes by audiophile engineer Bob Katz. It arrives in an old style mini-LP tip-on sleeve. Strictly limited to 500 copies!
    $27.00
  • "I was totally unaware that Pain Of Salvation was coming out with a new EP until I was offered the chance to review it. While I would not consider myself a Pain Of Salvation die-hard like some of my friends, I really enjoyed "The Perfect Element Pt. I" quite a bit. That being said, their past couple of albums have kind of sucked, especially the rap-metalesque "Scarsick". I know I was definitely wondering what direction Pain Of Salvatioin would be heading next.Pain Of Salvation was formed all the way back in 1984, but their first album was not released until 1997. They have since been releasing albums regularly and built up quite a solid (and at times fanatical) fanbase in the process. The first four tracks on this EP are set to appear on a new two-disc studio album some time in the future.The good news to start off is that this is nothing like "Scarsick"; there’s no rapping, no disco, none of stuff that garnered that album so much criticism. In fact, if one was to compare this to another Pain Of Salvation album, I would say that it is most similar to something that could be found on "Entropia". There is less of a focus on complex arrangements and layered instruments; instead opting for a more straightforward approach. There seems to be a strong influence of 70’s Rock, and not necessarily 70’s prog-rock either.This is not a bad thing, however. In fact, I’m rather glad that this is the direction that the band is taking. In my opinion, Pain Of Salvation was in danger of collapsing under their own ambition and pretentiousness. They needed to step back and focus on what it was that made them such a great band in the first place, especially after several big lineup changes.Each of the four songs that are set to appear on the forthcoming album is excellent. If the rest of the album is on the same level as these four songs, we will have an album that will be right up there with "The Perfect Element Pt. 1" and "Remedy Lane". The interview is mostly just the band screwing around, so that is hardly worthwhile. The Scorpions cover that closes the album is nice, but hardly essential.If you really need a Pain Of Salvation fix, then by all means pick up this EP. However, I would advise against it simply because I believe that these songs that will appear on the forthcoming album will be even stronger when in the context of the album as a whole. This review will hopefully serve as a beacon of hope that disgruntled fans should not give up on this band, at least not yet." - Metal Temple
    $7.00
  • Third album from this popular Danish band that some how successfully melds rockabilly and metal.
    $15.00
  • Once again Andy Franck unleashes his heavy side. Funny how different this sounds from Symphorce.
    $11.00
  • Gorgeous new album from Fabio "Finisterre" Zuffanti's side project. Wonderful production highlights delicate progressive music that will bring a twinkle to the eye of any fan of Celeste or the lighter moments of White Willow. Mellotron, violin, fragile female vocals - the latest from Hostsonaten is one of the year's best prog albums. The whole thing comes in an over the top package. Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • New digipak edition from SPV of the original double album, originally released in 1971. ADII was hit or miss but this one was mostly hit.
    $17.00
  • Lifesigns is a new band put together by keyboardist journeyman John Young, along with Nick Beggs (Steve Hackett), and Martin Beedle (Cutting Crew).  Featured guests include Steve Hackett, Jakko Jakszyk, Thijs Van Leer, and Robin Boult.  5 long tracks that have a contemporary prog sound but with nice extended instrumental parts.  Not a technical tour de force - emphasis here is on melody.  I'm reminded a bit of Steve Hackett's recent works.  While John Young has written all the material, bassist/Stickist Nick Beggs quietly steals the show.
    $15.00
  • Second album from this up and coming band from the Canadian Northwest. Black Mountain pay homage the spirit of 70s psychedelic hard rock. The music has some prog moves and the band is at their best when they jam it out like on the 16 minute "Bright Lights". Hey they aren't afraid to toss in lots of Mellotron either! Tangentially related to the retro-school that bands like Wolfmother are mining but frankly these guys are even better. "If this is the future, start growing out your facial hair now, because it looks like the blood-crazed Canadian hippies will inherit the Earth. Black Mountain are four men and a maiden from Vancouver, reveling in psychedelic prog metal with all the Seventies flourishes. In stoner-detention epics like "Wucan" and "Queens Will Play," they bring metal guitars, multipart song structures, temples-of-Syrinx poetry and vintage synths that sound like they were beamed in from some lost Argent or ELP session. Black Mountain's 2005 debut made them a hit with budding viking warriors everywhere, but In the Future has an even bigger kick, with a surprising blues edge and Amber Webber's vocals adding a touch of Sandy Denny to the battle-of-Evermore vibe. It definitely says something for Black Mountain's achievements that the two best moments here are also the weightiest — the eight-minute "Tyrants" and the sixteen-minute "Bright Lights." " - Rob Sheffield/Rolling Stone Still undecided? Check this out - you can hear the entire album on the band's Myspace page: Black Mountain - In The Future
    $14.00
  • "‘Les Fleurs du Mal’ is a conceptual album by Swedish band THERION that features only French lyrics and consists of cover versions of old French pop songs from 60-70s. THERION celebrates by "a special art project", headlining by the material, its 25 anniversary. It was also said that the album is available only during the tour and from THERION online store; it is sponsored by the only founding member, Christofer Johnsson. But you can buy it i.e. on Amazon as well. I am not going to go at length comparing THERION old and new and trying to rationalise things. The reason is simple, as this album was actually the first that caught my full attention. I start from the cover: it's full of topless females. Obviously, Charles Baudelaire's legacy is quite reminiscent there. The cover is made of a quite rich artwork of Saturno Butto, themed mainly erotic and varying from matte painting to charcoal sketches.Most of the songs here are quite short, yet powerful. Why these songs? I have at hand some lengthy explanations from the press kit, but in fact it boils to one single thing: the overall direction of French songs that are dark and telling some quite grim stories. Yet we all aware of a largely poetic language and melodic music background of French culture. Christofer has a great, fluent knowledge of musical styles and approaches, so he claims influences from King Diamond, Candlemass to folk music and ABBA. The album is beating with energy, in carries you along with its set of 15 songs performed mainly by the lead opera singer, soprano Lori Lewis.Of course I was curious about how exactly the original songs were altered. It's too much of effort to get past all these tracks, so I picked few favourites. ‘Mon amour, mon ami’ by Marie Laforet is a playful pop song, performed originally in circus-like up-tempo, but THERION specialists worked closely in order bring about the "inner darkness", toned down tempo and timbre and added traditionally "darker" music instruments such as organ - so song became indeed heavier and more minor, yet more powerful and strong. ‘Polichinelle’, performed with a cute teenage girl's voice by France Gall, is initially a pretty love ballad that relates to a Commedia dell 'arte character (note that comedian masks are worn by the naked ladies on the album booklet. (Thumbs up for the throughout conceptual work!) THERION ended up with an operetta rendering of the song, making of it somewhat of an opera house hymn, this type of sound you would expect from contemporary French musicals. Despite being one of the most experimental pieces on the album, it would be, probably, one of the most noticeable tracks.Finally, Victoire Scott's ‘Une fleur dans le coeur’ - Christofer did not like very much a feature you can hear in original, the honky-tonk (tuned-off) piano that he only describes as "dreadful". Instead, THERION interpretation is deeply lyrical, with plenty of acoustic guitar and strong soprano of Lori multiplied by the riffs you might expect from Jann Tiersen, metal additions and whole lot of different styles changing one to another. One drawback that I see is that the vocal style often remains of the same across album, so if you listen to 15 songs in a row, you might be tired a bit with the similar style. Yet the band paid enough attention to insert pleasant breaks by quest vocalists. The album sounds sound, fresh, and original and there is additional fun to compare originals to the covers." - Reflections Of Darkness
    $11.00
  • "You've got to give Signum Regis founder and bass player Ronnie Konig some credit. He keeps trying to up his game with each new Signum Regis album. With his third album, Exodus, he tackles another concept album: the slavery in and exodus of the Israelites from Egypt from the Biblical book of the same name. Additionally, rather than a single lead vocalist, namely Goran Edman, Konig brings in no less than nine notable vocalists. (See the list below.) Whether this amounts to a good thing will be in the ear of listener.Something that has not changed is Signum Regis' sound, remaining traditional European melodic heavy and power metal. Considering the nature and significance of the Biblical story, some properly composed power metal could give the listener a lively interpretation of that story. Often it does.For instance, in pace, lyrics, and vocal arrangement there's a feeling of urgency within Let Us Go!, as the Hebrews seek release from their Egyptian masters. If you recall your Biblical history, you'll remember that Pharaoh was not to happy with Moses, becoming royally pissed and stubborn. Wrath of the Pharoah gets some of that with it's heavy and raging sound and piercing vocals. Of course, Pharaoh and all Egypt was warned of what would happen if they did not comply with Yahweh's wishes. The Ten Plagues offers some bracing straight power metal, with some ripping guitar work, to emphasize the drama of the event.Curiously, I would have thought the song Last Days in Egypt, which would have included the first passover ceremony (and foreshadowing Christ's atonement later), to be a more somber and introspective piece, perhaps acoustic guitar driven. Rather, it's basically electric guitar driven instrumental. There's some drama to the centerpiece song, Exodus, as it has a marching feel, thinking of the Israelites marching to their freedom.Finally, but not the final song, Song of Deliverance, based on Moses' song after crossing the Red Sea from Exodus 15, is likely the best and clearest reference to this profound and true story. It's also one of the better songs on the album because it's not all charging power metal. No, there's rather light breakdown just before the middle and also at the end that adds a reflective character to the story and song.The album comes with a bonus track, Mountain of God. Though the lyrics are hard to define, this song may have something to do with Israel arriving at Mount Sinai and the giving of the ten commandments.While this is probably the best Signum Regis album to date, some might find it too familiar, and there for redundant, thanks to the predictable, or typical, as the case may be, European power metal throughout. Nevertheless, it's also still very good melodic heavy power metal from some talented fellows who know how to get it right. Recommended." - Dangerdog.comExodus Guest VocalistsLance King [ex. Pyramaze, Balance of Power], Michael Vescera [Obsession, Animetal USA], Matt Smith [Theocracy], Daísa Munhoz [Vandroya, Soulspell], Eli Prinsen [Sacred Warrior, The Sacrificed], Samuel Nyman [Manimal], Thomas L. Winkler [Gloryhammer, Emerald], Göran Edman [ex. Yngwie Malmsteen, John Norum] and Mayo Petranin [Castaway].
    $14.00
  • Reissue of the band's long out of print album from 2001, originally released on Monster Zero.  The band's sound at this point is a bit more primitive and raw in a way - its definitely guitar freak out psychedelia but there is a desert/stoner rock feel.  More overly like Monster Magnet and Kyuss.  The brain blower is the near 20 minute "Elektrohasch" in wich guitarist Stefan Koglek really lets it all hang out.
    $16.00
  • 2CD live recording from the Paradise Theater in Boston.  Recorded on April 15, 1988.  If you don't know 3 was the one shot band that featured Keith Emerson, Carl Palmer, and Robert Berry.  Besides sporting mullets the band ran through a set list that relied heavily on their album as well as a little ELP, a little Emerson solo material, and even The Nice.  It seemed like a good idea at the time...
    $17.00
  • "2 CD ANTHOLOGY BY THE LEGENDARY PROGRESSIVE ROCK GROUP CRESSIDA24 TRACKS REMASTERED FROM THE ORIGINAL TAPES FEATURING EVERY TRACK FROM THE BAND’S TWO ALBUMS RECORDED FOR THE LEGENDARY VERTIGO LABEL BETWEEN 1970 & 1971WITH FIVE PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED TRACKS – INCLUDING TWO FROM A 1970 BBC SESSION, TWO UNRELEASED DEMOS AND AN UNRELEASED SINGLE TRACK BOOKLET WITH FULLY RESTORED ARTWORK, RARE PHOTOGRAPHS & ESSAY. Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce a 2CD ANTHOLOGY by the legendary Progressive Rock group CRESSIDA. One of the finest groups to sign to the legendary VERTIGO label in 1969, CRESSIDA’s unique Progressive Rock style earned them a loyal fan base in the early 1970s, with their legend growing over the ensuing decades and their followers growing, with notable aficionados including MICHEAL AKERFELDT of the band OPETH. The roots of Cressida were sown in March 1968, when guitarist John Heyworth answered an advertisement in Melody Maker, and later travelled to London to join The Dominators. With vocalist Angus Cullen he settled down to some serious writing, eventually welcoming bassist Kevin McCarthy and drummer Iain Clark to the fold and now calling themselves Charge. In 1969, shortly after returning from a German tour, the band's organist Lol Coker decided to leave, and moved back to Liverpool to marry his Swiss girlfriend and take over his father's business. He had stayed just long enough to play on the band's first demo, which got them a recording contract with Vertigo Records. Peter Jennings then joined. At this point the band settled on the name Cressida. Their first gigs as Cressida were in Germany, including the Star-Club in Hamburg sharing the bill with Colosseum and East Of Eden, in the Autumn of 1969.The band’s self-titled debut album was recorded at Wessex Studios with Ossie Byrne producing, and was one of the earliest releases on Vertigo. Cressida went through a difficult phase when Heyworth was forced to leave in early 1970. He was replaced by John Culley. The new line-up recorded Cressida's second LP, Asylum, later in 1970 (again with Byrne producing, and with orchestral arrangements by Graeme Hall), but it was released pos-thumously in 1971, the band having broken up in September 1970. Noted jazz flautist Harold McNair guested on the song "Lisa" from the album. Heyworth sadly died in January 2010, but in 2011, three of the four surviving original members of the band, Angus Cullen, Iain Clark, and Kevin McCarthy got together again with Peter Jennings. This anthology has been compiled by the group themselves and is a fine tribute to an inspiring band and has been newly re-mastered from the original master tapes, and features a booklet with new essay."
    $12.00