Slow Motion

SKU: ECLEC2062
Label:
Esoteric
Category:
Progressive Rock
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"Originally released in 1974, Slow Motion was another classic album in the catalogue of Welsh rock legends, Man. Touring extensively to support the record, Man delivered a stunning series of concerts and made a triumphant return to the USA early the following year. As part of Esoteric s reissue programme of the MAN catalogue we are proud to present the re-mastered album and with a selection of studio out-takes and four previously unreleased live tracks recorded in California in May 1975. With superbly re-mastered sound and lavish booklet with notes by Man s Deke Leonard, this is yet another essential release for fans of Man."

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  • CD/DVD in a digibook.  The DVD is the complete show and the CD maxxes out due to the time limitations."In May 2012 Anathema released Weather Systems, the most acclaimed and successful album of a career that has spanned over two decades. The album scored high in numerous critics end of year polls around the world and cemented their reputation as one of the most exciting and progressive bands around. Following the release of the album, the band embarked on a lengthy world tour. The European leg of the tour opened with a triumphant one-off show at the ancient Roman theatre of Philippopolis with the Plovdiv Philharmonic Orchestra in September 2012. Directed by celebrated filmmaker Lasse Hoile, Universal captures the magic of the event ."
    $17.00
  • "Failing to make any waves with their first album, this Norwegian group got themselves together and started to make this monster of an album. Unfortunately, due to reasons beyond my knowing, the band was dropped by their label and soon disbanded. This album was never finished, but was released as a free download on the internet for all to enjoy. Confusing to this fact is the production value of the album. It doesn't sound raw at all... really, it sounds like the band put tons of polish on the album... quite confusing for an album that would never hit shelves. More evidence to support the fact that this album is unfinished is the fact that the album doesn't even sport any cover art. Not that that takes away from the album at all. In fact, the only time that it shows that the album is unfinished is that the final song when... well, I'll let that be a surprise.It's a real shame that this band never really got the feet under it to go anywhere, because the music here is fantastic!As previous reviewers have stated, it's likely better to ignore the tech/extreme label on the band here. The music here really sounds like X-over or even heavy prog. Any fans of those genres will likely be blown away by this album. Strong bass lines (always a selling point for me) and some wonderful organ parts (reminiscent of classic Deep Purple) are what highlight this album so much along with some excellent melodies and hooks that demand repeated listening.Opening with the quirky STARCHASER this album never lets down. The keys and guitars kick in right away as do the killer bass lines. Rapidly changing pace the song makes its way with some truly excellent moments. The floating keys in the background give the song an airy feel among all that pounding rhythm section until the song finally comes to an end. To quote the song Enjoy the ride!. DESERT MACHINE continues with the strong bass lines and drives across this heavy song with a bang. ACCORDION WOMAN is the song that brings forth the most notable Deep Purple influences, its notable riff and organ making for a nice combination as the catchy chorus blends in for a very notable track. Getting heavier and more into the guitar work is TERMINAL, similar to its predecessor in terms of organ/guitar work, this song is actually probably the simplest song out the of the mix so far. Still good none the less, and a good song to rock out to. A slow bridge/chorus also make for an interesting mixture.Then we get to the really good stuff.BLOOD IS BLOOD is the biggest standout on the album. Being the longest track this song also manages to capture everything already mentioned about the album that's great. Half of the song being an instrumental overture, the band really gets to strut their stuff here. The killer bass lines are back with a vengeance and so are the keys. The guitar drifts a bit more towards the background here but still provides a nice section. Really picking up around the 2 minute mark everything just keeps getting faster and better until everything simply dies off and the vocals bring out the song with some much more subdued work from the other members. Fantastico!Coming into the second half of the album the band still manages to keep interest.Starting off the mix is the quick instrumental WE WILL CRIMSON YOU. A clearly Fripp inspired song that's quite good (if not quite Crimson caliber), and the guitar actually coming to the foreground to take the helm from the keys and bass for a bit, even if they still are there. Almost bordering on Black Sabbath (mixed with the KC) sounding, this song is a nice change in pace. U is a quirky track that's yet another change in pace. Heavy and clunky, this track shows off the more metal side of the band. UNDEAD is a fairly lo-key track that feels necessary to start to tail off the album with. Good but not great, this song actually feels like a bit of filler. However, all is forgiven with the next (and final) track. NOTHING NEW is an unfortunately accurate and slightly foreboding title (it's their last song, so nothing new after this!). The song, however, is marvelous! slower than it's brothers yet still wonderful ear candy, this song is another one of those songs that epitomizes what the band does best. More great bass lines and keys coupled with some more to the front guitar work and blissful melodies makes one want this song to last forever. Coming to the end with some Wakeman like boards and a guitar that really picks up the song...the song... the song..!!! ... cuts off. It just ends. Likely meant to be the album's epic and never finished the song really just leaves you wanting more, which is both good and bad. Good because that's how an album should always end (with you wanting more) but bad because they're never going to follow up on this album and their debut will likely be tough to find. Oh well.Wonderful music from a terribly misfated band that is recommended to all. (As mentioned before) Fans of heavy prog and X-over should give this album a shot, because it's a wonderfully hidden gem. Anyone who wants to check them out can search them up on the internet and download the album for free (and legally, too). 4 stars, it's not a masterpiece... but it sure is a great listen." - ProgArchives
    $15.00
  • 2LP vinyl edition arrives comes with a CD of the album as well. FOREIGN CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU WILL BE SUBJECT TO ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES DUE TO THE HEAVIER WEIGHT OF THE VINYL EDITION."‘Map of the Past‘, the fifth studio album from Cumbrian prog rockers It Bites, will most likely inhabit a strange, disturbing place in your heart. It’s a release that is obscurely beautiful and tender, but also one that can occasionally sound incongruous and lost in time. Very often, when it comes to progressive music, people will often justify anything odd by defending it with its genre. In the case of It Bites, there is a temptation to lean on a sound from their 80s heyday, which occasionally makes ‘Map of the Past’ seem staid and not just a little cheesy.In places this album is a wonderful, soaring retrospect vision of a forgotten generation, built around the ‘discovery of an old family photograph’. Although not a concept album per se, ‘Map of the Past’ explores the idea of lives captured within photographs, and reflects these contemplative visions with equally thoughtful music; album opener, ‘Man In the Photograph’ opens with the fuzz of radio static and soon leads into sound of organs and John Mitchell’s recollections borne from this one picture. The song blends into the more progressive sounding fare of ‘Wallflower‘ and its indulgent synth solo. The title track is more engaging, with soaring chorus vocals and disorientating time signatures, showcasing the tight musicianship and richly mature songwriting ability that has grown from their 30 years of existence.The strength of this album falters with ‘Flag’ and its irrepressibly outdated smattering of 80s memorabilia and Sting powered vocal lines, although the lyrics are undoubtedly more engaging than any Police offshoot. The album does have a tendency to wander into these unpalatable territories, but more than often than not redeems itself; as the grandiose, irresistible flounce of ‘Send No Flowers‘ resurrects its orchestral bombast and moves into ‘Meadow and the Stream’s artistically detailed backdrop, it’s clear that this album is more rollercoaster than record. The album finishes, as it started, relying on simply constructed songs and that radio static to bookmark the end; ‘The Last Escape’ is honestly beautiful, and seems even more so in contrast to the tumult of the remainder of the record.‘Map of the Past’ shifts between temporal paradigms rather than changing between tracks; it’s a scintillating album that is honest to itself, and stays true to It Bites’ form, even if it does rely on sounds from their back backcatalogue occasionally. Despite this, the depth of the album is phenomenal and is genuinely rich in its storyline, with music that peaks and troughs fittingly. Well worth a listen if you find yourself pointed at the progosphere." - Bring The Noise
    $20.00
  • New progressive rock/metal trio from the UK that has the chance to blow up big. The band goes for an epic sound with the core trio augmented by the "The Lost Orchestra". Melancholy seems to be the overall theme here reminding of Riverside, Opeth, Tool and even some Pink Floyd. It can get quite heavy at times but overall it would be safe to categorize this as progressive rock. There is the odd growly part that made me think of Opeth - not a bad thing. The symphonic parts are quite beautiful and sad at the same time - Riverside's "Loose Heart" would be an apt comparison. An emotional roller coaster ride with plenty of space and...yes...intricacy. If you like your prog drenched in thick atmosphere this one is going to crush your skull. Highly recommended.
    $19.00
  • Hot fusion album recorded by this legendary British guitarist probably more known for his session work than anything else although he did have some great bands like The Running Man and Mouse. Cuneiform Records signed Russell for his long awaited new solo album and here is what they had to say: "Like contemporaries Sonny Sharrock and Terje Rypdal, Russell makes it sound as if the guitar is not enough, as if he's reaching for something wilder, something that can't be contained within the 6 string cage"-Jim O'Rourke. Guitarist Ray Russell has been a professional musician since he was 15 and he joined the John Barry Seven (famous for their James Bond soundtracks). Not hugely known to the general public, for over four decades he has worked with artists as diverse as Nucleus, Gil Evans, Van Morrison, Cat Stevens, Bill Fay, Jack Bruce, Michael Gibbs, Tina Turner, Bryan Ferry and many, many others. His wide-ranging solo career got into gear during the late 60s and can be viewed as a simultaneous and wilder variant of the same path towards electric jazz that Miles Davis and others took during this time, releasing a number of very collectable and ahead of their time albums, and becoming one of the earliest truly 'out' guitarists of the late 60s in the process. Goodbye Svengali is influenced by and dedicated to visionary jazz arranger Gil Evans, and includes one of Gil's final recordings. It is an album that mixes dark fusion, lyrical guitar pieces and icy soundscapes. Ray's playing style can be compared to such great players as Sonny and Terje, as Jim noted, but also to John McLaughlin, John Abercrombie and Jeff Beck! Includes performances by noted U.K. fusion/rock players such as Mo Foster, Gary Husband, Tony Hymas, Simon Phillips and others." HUZZAH!!
    $13.00
  • Standard edition comes (at the moment) with a slipcase "o" card wrapper."It’s been quite a past few years for the incredible Anathema. Honors have been bestowed upon them, they’ve released an instant classic album in “Weather Systems”, and last year they released one of the best live concert films I’ve ever seen, “Universal”. Anathema is on top of the world, and they are only getting bigger. With all of this on their shoulders, they approach the world once again with their new album, “Distant Satellites”, a fitting name for a massive album. Again, with all of their recent success creating huge expectations, can this band meet such critical reception? Needless to say, Vincent Cavanagh on vocals, Danny Cavanagh on guitar, Jamie Cavanagh on bass, John Douglas on percussion, Daniel Cardoso on drums, and Lee Douglas with her wonderful vocals were all up to the challenge.“Distant Satellites” is a very different album from “Weather Systems”, or anything else they’ve done, for that matter. It is different, yet somehow instantly familiar. It includes everything that makes them Anathema, but adds new and exciting elements to their already excellent formula. If you’ve never heard Anathema, their formula (in their last few albums, anyways) includes soaring guitars, amazingly catchy melodies, spiritual lyrics, and emotional flow both vocally and structurally. They are the masters of melody, and they remain complex and progressive even while being simple and accessible. They are truly masters of their craft.This new album, then, is no different in those terms. The melodies return in force, such as the serene beauty of “The Lost Song” parts 1-3. And, yet, there is something different here. The melodic lines are somewhat more complex, less in-your-face, and more organic. This especially shows in the song lengths, most of them being over five minutes. This allows for more growth and more progression. Indeed, then, the melodies on “Distant Satellites”, while not being as instantly lovable or recognizable, are certainly more difficult and possibly will have a longer “shelf life” in my mind. Yes, the orchestrations seem to be lower key, as well, allowing the vocalists to express themselves more personally then ever.There are other improvements, too. I feel that the musicianship is more fervent and on a higher plateau of difficulty than Anathema has tried. Drummer John Douglas, especially, plays amazingly well from start to finish, accenting the music with awesome pounding and fills. The rest of the band are at their peak, too, with Vincent and Lee being especially great with emotional and meaningful vocal performances.“Distant Satellites” is different in more meaningful ways, too. Utilizing post-rock/metal structures is nothing new for Anathema, but they really do perfect them here, as on “Dusk”, a dark, climactic song. Yet, there is a sense of continuity between tracks, too. This is obviously the case between the three parts of “The Lost Song”, but it’s also apparent throughout the album, as if Anathema is telling us a story, convincing us of our true selves and our connection with the universe and with each other.This album is wonderful in the first half, but my excitement reached new heights in the second half. Anathema has taken it upon themselves to change things up a bit. They wanted to progress their sound, but make it all seem so natural. So, in the second half, the album climaxes with one of the best songs, simply called “Anathema”. But then, we are thrown for a loop somewhat, as “You’re Not Alone” features a hefty portion of electronic vibe. It’s great, but the best is still to come.Next, “Firelight”, a darkly ethereal instrumental track that is completely electronic, is thrust upon us, and is followed up by what may possibly be the best song Anathema has ever produced, “Distant Satellites”. This track combines everything that has ever made Anathema great: soaring melodies, climactic structure, gentle spirituality, amazing vocals, and now an electronic beat that is both complex and catchy. Vibrant, mesmerizing, and pure, this track elates me every time I hear it. It takes this album, and my heart, to new heights. The album finishes with a gentle ballad that just seems so fitting, yet it still has the strong electronic influence.So, is “Distant Satellites” a winner? In every way! Is it their best album? I don’t know; it has the potential, but it might take time, just like “Weather Systems” did. What I can tell you is that this new album is more mature, more progressive, more interesting and eclectic, and less formulaic then anything Anathema has crafted yet. It does sacrifice some accessibility and some instant likability for these things, but I respect their decision massively, and I fully expect to see “Distant Satellites” at the tops of many lists at the end of 2014." - Progulator
    $9.00
  • Fourth album from this interesting German band.  Frequency Drift has really grown by leaps and bounds over the course of their four albums.  The band original characterized themselves as cinematic progressive rock.  I think you can pretty much throw that out the window.  Still plenty of similarities to White Willow but the band has for the most part developed their own sound.  Vocalist Antje Auer sings with plaintive urgency - she has a very pleasant voice.  The real star is violinist Frank Schmitz.  He creates some real fire.  The typical symphonic rock instrumentation is augmented by a battery of medieval instruments as well as clarinet and flute.  On the 15 minute "Cold" the band blisses out in the middle into an Eloy inspired space jam.  A definite grower.  Highly recommended.
    $16.00
  • "Frontiers Records won't be wasting any time in early 2013, as the label has a host of upcoming releases sure to thrill lovers of melodic hard rock & heavy metal. The latest from Norwegian vocalist Jorn Lande and his band is called Symphonic, a collection of songs from throughout his career with added classical orchestrations. In some instances the songs were completely remixed to add even more room for the orchestrations, but what's cool about this collection is that none of the songs lose their bite, but have become even more majestic with the added elements.Now, for all you Jorn fans out there, no doubt you already own or have heard these songs before, so I'm not sure how much of an 'autobuy' Symphonic will be, but as someone who also fall into that category, this is most certainly a fun and intriguing listen. The orchestral arrangements were conducted by Lasse Jensen, and in some songs they play a large role, and on others simply complementary. Some of the heavier rockers, like "I Came to Rock", "Like Stone in Water", "Burn Your Flame", and "Man of the Dark" sound even more powerful and grandiose with the added symphonics. Basically, these are all great songs, but for those that like the sounds of acts like Kamelot or Nightwish, there will be even more appeal to these tunes now. The Masterplan classic "Time to Be King" (which Lande has now adopted as his own seeing as he is no longer part of that outfit once again) is given roaring new life here, and the cover of Dio's "Rock and Roll Children" is simply marvelous with the extra orchestral arrangements. Throw in a few lush ballady type pieces in "Black Morning", "The World I See", and "Behind the Clown" (which are tailor made for this project), complete with soaring arrangements and Lande's emotional delivery, and you have a very enjoyable reworking of some standout Jorn material. And, wait till you hear the Black Sabbath gem "Mob Rules" with the added orchestra...wow.In summary, Symphonic might not be essential to most, but for loyal Jorn fans it should prove to be a lot of fun." - Sea Of Tranquility
    $15.00
  • Already dubbed "Toddrÿche" by their fans, Queensryche turn back the clock with their new eponymous titled album.  With Geoff Tate given the boot, the band sounds revitalized with the addition of former Crimson Glory vocalist Todd La Torre.  While its not going to supplant Operation: Mindcrime, the sound harkens back to the band's roots.  La Torre was previously a member of a Queensryche cover band so he does a pretty damn fine approximation of Geoff Tate's glory days.  For years fans have been hoping the band would return to their progressive roots and it took this youth injection to get it done.Please note that this is the standard edition.  It comes with a patch and a slipcase.  There will be a deluxe version forthcoming.
    $12.00
  • Killer retro-prog from Norway laced with strong elements of doom metal.  This band is an offshoot from the outrageous Procosmian Fannyfiddlers, a rather bizarre band that created a rather unique, expletive drenched form of burlesque prog.  This is something totally different and a hell of a lot better.  Highly recommended."Abandoned By The Sun’ is a non-linear narrative, its focal point being the dubious disappearance of a 15-year old girl, her disappearance securing a downward spiral and a grave ripple effect that threatens to ruin the lives of everyone close to her. The idea projected is that nothing can be worse than to lose someone dear without getting any answers.Opening track, ‘Sudden Dereliction’, establishes a link to the previous record and the album’s finale, ‘Finite’, offers a glimpse of what really happened that fatal day, though leaving the listeners sufficient interpretive space to make up their own minds. In-between these bookends, the music moves in multiple, unexpected directions, showcasing great melody lines, and a high degree of diversity, underlining the sadness and despair of the libretto’s protagonists.On ‘Abandoned By The Sun’, Mater Thallium explore the inter-human mechanisms at work when a person vanishes without a trace.This is old-school heavy progressive rock, with a twist of doom, topped with flourishes of Scandinavian folk music." 
    $17.00
  • "With 'Home', for the first time since their critically acclaimed 'Posthumous Silence' of 2006, Sylvan have taken the chance to create another full-on concept album. Even though the Hamburg natives attach great importance to creating contextually comprehensive pieces of art with any of their albums, this time around Sylvan have upped their ambition another notch and taken on the mammoth task of building an overall concept around the never ending quest of the human condition for 'home' - that very special place that can provide a feeling of complete safety."
    $14.00
  • "Spirit was formed with the intention to combine jazz, rock, classical, and folk with a mystical orientation. Led by the family duo of Hendrix-inspired guitarist Randy California and his uncle, jazz drummer Ed Cassidy (whose shaved head--some 20 years ahead of its time--was the band's visual focus), Spirit had a few idiosyncratic hits such as "I Got A Line On You." The band didn't reach its prime until Twelve Dreams, after which they promptly broke up. A loosely constructed sci-fi concept album, it contains the band's biggest hit, the ecological "Nature's Way" (complete with booming kettle drums), the surreal rock of "Animal Zoo," and the orchestral psychedelia of "Life Has Just Begun." Bristling with ideas, energy, and California's meaty guitar, Twelve Dreams exemplifies the best of the late '60s experimentalism."
    $12.00
  • Hey I didn't make up the album title!  Leave that to guitarist Chato Segerer.  He's an admitted fan of Frank Zappa and that is apparent in his songwriting.  If you are a fan of Morglbl and Panzerballet I think you'll lose it over Chato's disc.  The humor is there but its very subtlely woven into the fabric of the music.  So overall what might appear to be some wacked out over the top album turns out to be a rather tasteful album of prog fusion with balls!
    $13.00
  • New edition comes with a bonus DVD filled with videos and documentaries. Same price as before!!Amaranthe are a new Swedish/Danish band signed to Spinefarm. The band is fronted by Elize, who you will know from her touring with Kamelot. To say Elize is hot is an understatement. The band don't take the expected gothic metal route. Their order of business is a mix of poppy-melodic metal laced with death metal. Curiously the band features three vocalists. Elize is front and center but she shares the spotlight with the death growls of Dreamland's Jake E and the clean vocals of Andy Solvestrom. At times there is a similarity to some of Delain's poppier tunes but the death growls add a heavier aspect. There was a buzz developing on this disc before it hit here - I have to say I was quite surprised.
    $12.00