Tales From The Lush Attic (2013 Remix CD/DVD)

The double disc hard back 32 page book comes with lots of extras, including the complete remix of the album, extra bonus tracks and a DVD featuring live video footage of material from ‘Tales’ along with a host of MP3 files, original mixes, audio commentary and previously unreleased writing/rehearsal/demo material.

The full track listing for the CD/DVD edition is:

CD:


• The Last Human Gateway

• Through The Corridors (Oh! Shit Me)
• Awake And Nervous

• My Baby Treats Me Right ‘Cos I’m A Hard Lovin’ Man All Night Long

• The Enemy Smacks

2013 remix by Michael Holmes

Engineered by Rob Aubrey

Bonus tracks
:

• Wintertell (2012 recording)
• The Last Human Gateway (end section, alternative vocals)
• Just Changing Hands (unfinished demo)

• Dans Le Parc du Château Noir (unfinished demo)

DVD:


• The Last Human Gateway
• Through The Corridors (Oh! Shit Me)

• About Lake Five / Awake And Nervous
• The Enemy Smacks


(Live at De Boerderij, Zoetermeer, Holland: October 23, 2011)

• Photo Gallery (contemporary photos and artwork)

• DIY Mix of ‘Through The Corridors': multi-track audio files and mixing software
MP3 files:


• ‘Tales From The Lush Attic’ (original mix: August 1983)


• Seven Stories into Eight (original cassette album)
• Tales from the Lush Attic - audio commentary by Peter and Mike
Further listening:


• The Enemy Smacks (first attempts: November 1982)
• 
The Last Human Gateway (writing session: February 1983)

• Just Changing Hands (instrumental demo: February 1983)

• Just Changing Hands (rehearsal: February 11, 1983)

• Wintertell (demo: July 1983)

• The Last Human Gateway (first complete version - rehearsal: July 27, 1983)

• Unused idea version 1 (rehearsal: August 1983)
• 
Unused idea version 2 (rehearsal: August 1983)

• Hollow Afternoon (demo, original lyrics: 1983)

• Just Changing Hands (Cava demo: 1984)

• The Last Human Gateway (middle section) (1991 recording)

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