Tales From The Soul

SKU: SR3025
Label:
Sensory Records
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Although together for only a brief time, Dutch progressive metal newcomers NovAct have begun to make a name for themselves in the metal world. On the basis of a strong four song demo the band was invited to perform at both the Headway Festival and ProgPower Europe in 2004. With their debut set for release on Sensory, NovAct is poised to continue their rise to prominence.

NovAct have found the perfect blend of melody and complexity echoing bands such as Dream Theater, Rush, Pain Of Salvation and Vanden Plas. Vocals are an important part of their sound and in that respect the band has one of metal's great new voices Eddy Borremans. Quite siimply Eddy doesn't sound like any one else! He has an uncanny ability to convey his emotions in every song in a way that brings warmth to a genre often categorizes as cold and emotionless. "Tales from the Soul" is thinking man's metal that aims for the heart as well as the head.

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