Tales From Topographic Oceans

SKU: 812273791-24
Label:
Rhino
Category:
Progressive Rock
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This is the Bill Inglot remaster from 2003 housed in a digipak. Comes with two bonus tracks - studio run throughs of "Dance Of The Dawn" and "Giants Under The Sun". For years I always felt this was my favorite Yes album. Revisiting it I find that my feelings about this album as well as Genesis' Lamb are that they would have made amazing 3 sided albums. The material wears thin in spots but the high points are perhaps the highest the band ever achieved. Deduct a point for over-reaching but add one back for trying.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:53
Rate: 
0
Coming out after Close to the Edge and Yessongs, there was a lot of anticipation on this release. It was also came out at the time of the first oil/gas crises. So, record companies were scrambling to get enough vinyl to make records. Many recordings that were originally destined to be double albums were cut back to one disc. Yes had the clout to have this recording released as originally planned. Enough history. Long tracks were in vogue and this recording certainly provided the goods. The topic was worthwhile, but there seemed to be a stretching of the material just to make these tracks. There is plenty of good music here. I think some skillful editing may have been used to have made this a real winner. Strangely, one edit that should not have been done and has been removed was the intro to the first track. It always sounded like it started aburptly and now it is a smooth transition to when Jon Anderson starts to sing. The musicianship was stellar as everyone was at the top of their game. This is a welcome addition to anyone's library who enjoys the music of Yes, but I would start with Close to the Edge or Fragile before tackling this recording
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 09:53
Rate: 
0
Coming out after Close to the Edge and Yessongs, there was a lot of anticipation on this release. It was also came out at the time of the first oil/gas crises. So, record companies were scrambling to get enough vinyl to make records. Many recordings that were originally destined to be double albums were cut back to one disc. Yes had the clout to have this recording released as originally planned. Enough history. Long tracks were in vogue and this recording certainly provided the goods. The topic was worthwhile, but there seemed to be a stretching of the material just to make these tracks. There is plenty of good music here. I think some skillful editing may have been used to have made this a real winner. Strangely, one edit that should not have been done and has been removed was the intro to the first track. It always sounded like it started aburptly and now it is a smooth transition to when Jon Anderson starts to sing. The musicianship was stellar as everyone was at the top of their game. This is a welcome addition to anyone's library who enjoys the music of Yes, but I would start with Close to the Edge or Fragile before tackling this recording
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