'Til Birth Do Us Part

'Til Birth Do Us Part

BY Behind The Curtain

(Customer Reviews)
$4.00
$ 2.40
SKU: SR3007
Label:
Sensory Records
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Denmark's Behind the Curtain create their own avant garde vision of metal for the next millenium. 'Til Birth Do Us Part is a concept album filled with dynamic contrasts of crushing guitar riffs, symphonic keyboards, and original vocals. Although complex in nature, Behind the Curtain's music is often subtle and filled with powerful emotions.

WE ARE CLOSING OUT OUR INVENTORY OF BEHIND THE CURTAIN "TIL BIRTH DO US PART". PLEASE NOTE ONCE OUR COPIES ARE SOLD WE WILL NOT BE REPRESSING IT.

Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
I've owned this disc for years. Still listen to it. It's different, but well worth it if you connect. Packs quite a punch. So very oringinal. Sad to see this band go. Your silly not to buy this, especially at such a give away price.
Sat, 2010-07-24 00:23
Rate: 
0
This record at this price is unreal. A very emotional and fluid album. The band is tight and syncopated with very memorable vocal and lyrical content. A must have in this genre. That price !
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Product Review

Tue, 2010-06-08 10:01
Rate: 
0
I've owned this disc for years. Still listen to it. It's different, but well worth it if you connect. Packs quite a punch. So very oringinal. Sad to see this band go. Your silly not to buy this, especially at such a give away price.
Sat, 2010-07-24 00:23
Rate: 
0
This record at this price is unreal. A very emotional and fluid album. The band is tight and syncopated with very memorable vocal and lyrical content. A must have in this genre. That price !
You must login or register to post reviews.
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