Time Of Legends

SKU: MA9044-2
Label:
Magna Carta
Category:
Progressive Rock
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Cairo's third offering doesn't pack any real suprises and that's probably a good thing. Keyboardist extraordinaire Mark Robertson keeps cranking out those lengthy ELP influenced tracks. As I've said before - if ELP was serving up material like this they would still be together and still be popular.

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  • Great double live album available at a budget price.
    $11.00
  • "German heavy metal marauders Scorpions recorded seven studio records before breaking in to the U.S. market in 1982 with Blackout. The album became the group's first platinum disc in the U.S., and the dynamic single "No One Like You" became a staple of album rock radio. While the Scorpions had created powerful anthems and epic rockers in the past, Blackout mixed the ingredients just right. The title track was an endorphin rush of fast-riffing guitars and electrified, high-pitched vocals that culminated with the sound of shattering glass. "Can't Live Without You" was a powerful melange of flash, firepower, and pure melody, and the slow, surging "China White" sounded like a psychedelic interpretation of Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir." After years of ignored visas, Scorpions had finally arrived in America."  -- Jon Wiederhorn
    $5.00
  • Liquorish Allsorts is the first solo album from Robert Webb, keyboardist for the legendary Britsh band England.  The set collects a variety of material from different era, dating all the way back to the early 70s and runs up to the present day.  Much of the material fits firmly in the prog category and some of it...not so much.  There are an endless number of musicians that contribute to the set including his former England bandmates.  Even Nicko McBrain is here!  Current musicians participating are drawn from Kenso and Resistor.
    $12.00
  • Bent Knee features members that are part of a collective of Berklee graduates.  The ensemble is led by guitarist Ben Levin and vocalist/keyboardist Courtney Swain.  The band also features violin, bass, and drums.  Refreshingly they don't shy away from the prog rock moniker although "art rock" seems to be the genre they are pigeonholed in.  Swain's vocals remind a bit of Edie Brickell but the music definitely has a prog vibe.  Not a lot of shredding but a nice mix of passionate and interesting vocal lines underscored by lead guitar and violin.  This is the band's 2011 album.  If you are a fan of District 97 curiousity might cause you to investigate this band.
    $11.00
  • Lobby Loyde is a name that I've seen for many a year in rare record catalogs but I never heard his music until now. An Australian guitarist of some reknown in his home country he apparently slogged on for years with a variety of bands. Beyond Morgia is a fascinating musical document that has sat on the shelf, unreleased, since it was recorded in 1976. Essentially Loyde came up with a concept for an instrumental space rock album that would be the soundtrack for a sci-fi novel he had written. It was recorded with a full band but never released. While it opens with a few disposable tracks of spacy synth noodling it eventually makes it way to 3 epic length tracks that are ripped right from the Pink Floyd play book circa Wish You Were Here and Animals. If I didn't tell you what you were listening to you would think it was Floyd - it's insane how much this sounds like them! By the way, this guy is a monster guitarist. He flys up and down the frets. Lobby gets low marks for originality but high marks for execution. The fact that something like this sat in the vaults for so long is amazing. Oh by the way, the disc comes in a gorgeous diecut digipak - the booklet has extensive notes and an interview with Lobby Loyde. I like it and recommend it because I love Pink Floyd and I can make believe that it's the missing album between WYWH and Animals. For the hell of it - here is the record label hype: Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster is the legendary, previously unreleased 1976 space rock album and the soundtrack to an imaginary film. In June 1976, Lobby Loyde was at a critical juncture in his career; he stood at the metaphorical musical crossroads where a number of pathways lay ahead of him yet nothing was certain. He had already established himself as one of Australia's legendary guitarists and rock personalities, having toured and recorded relentlessly with The Purple Hearts, The Wild Cherries, The Aztecs, Coloured Balls and Southern Electric. Yet where was he to go from here? With his faith in Australian music at low-ebb, he'd already decided to travel to London to check out the scene over there. One final order of business he had to complete before his departure in early July was to record a new album. Lobby had written the music for a space rock concept album which he wanted to record as the instrumental soundtrack for a proposed sci-fi film, all of which was based on his unpublished novel called Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster. Beyond Morgia was recorded at Armstrong Studios one weekend in June 1976, with the guys from Southern Electric on hand. The tapes went missing for many years, presumed lost forever but they recently surfaced. The album itself is an incredibly eclectic and diverse assortment of music: vast swathes of glacial keyboard notes with Loyde's unique, soaring psych-rock guitar work to the fore. It is classic space rock, beginning with a brooding electronic pulse (think early Tangerine Dream circa Electronic Meditation and Alpha Centauri), before building to a climactic guitar crescendo that echoes Pink Floyd at their most spacious and futuristic (think Ummagumma and Meddle -- with just a hint of Hawkwind's wind-tunnelling space explorations from Space Ritual). On top of that are Loyde's classical music influences, in particular his great love of Wagner and Beethoven, which come out in much of the music. Finally seeing the light of day -- 31 years after it was recorded -- Beyond Morgia: The Labyrinths Of Klimster is a worthy addition to the diverse catalog of the great Lobby Loyde."
    $20.00
  • Well Steve is done resucitating the Genesis catalogue and back to concentrating on fresh solo material.  The new album Wolflight is a bit of a loose concept album and I find it to be one of his strongest releases in years.  The album is filled with lots of guests (including Chris Squire) contributing exotic instruments to the mix adding an old world sound.  Steve's trademark sound is locked into place so if you are looking for the wailing guitar, liquid runs and acoustic delicacy you won't be disappointed.  His vocals has never been my favorite part of a Steve Hackett album but either I've mellowed in age or his voice has - not sure which.  Regardless it fits the music just fine.  Classic Hackett and nothing less.  BUY OR DIE!
    $12.00
  • Gentle Knife is a new band from Norway that will definitely bring a wide grin to the face of any prog fan.  This is a huge 10 piece ensemble that features both male and female lead vocals, tons of keys (yup - you get your Mellotron right here), reeds, guitar, bass and drums.  Male vocals seem to predominate but even still I'm reminded quite a bit of White Willow's debut Ignis Fatuus - even more so when the female singer comes on board.  There is a dark and mystical quality to the music.  Not surprising - I did say they are Norwegian.  When the instrumental jams kick in there are jazz overtones blending with Crimsonoid evil.  This just arrived at Casa Laser's Edge so it needs more plays to really sink in.  The first few times through the album I'm liking what I'm hearing...a lot!  Highly recommended."Gentle Knife is a Norwegian progressive rock band counting 10 members. With both male and female vocals, guitars, synths, mellotron, woodwinds and everything else you would or would not expect, the band combines the mood of the ‘70s with a modern take on the genre. The band has a clear visual identity based in the artworks of Brian Talgo. The band has a long time perspective.Gentle Knife’s eponymous debut recounts the tale of an ill-fated wanderer lost in the depths of a haunted forest. An 8-part suite rooted in the classic rock concept album. Recorded/premixedby √ėyvind Engebretsen at Sound Lab Studioes, with final mix by Neil Kernon. Mastered by Morten Lund at Lunds Lyd."
    $14.00
  • Amazing new solo album from Keith Emerson in collaboration with guitarist Marc Bonilla. Easily the best thing he's done outside of ELP/The Nice. He's playing his standard arsenal of grand piano, Hammond C3, the modular Moog, pipe organ plus assorted other synths. Handling drums is Greg Bissonette and Bob Birch is on bass. The album kicks off with the 35 minute suite "The House Of Ocean Born Mary". From the first note you hear the unmistable imprint of Keith Emerson. The album is littered with trademark organ solos - enough to give you flashbacks. Bonilla is a more than satisfactory vocalist, sounding closer to John Wetton than he does Greg Lake. He tends to shy away from shredding, keeping guitar in a supporting role and leaving the spotlight to the keyboards. The album includes "The Art Of Falling Down" which is a reworking of a piece that ELP played on their last tour called "Crossing The Rubicon". Of course you get one of Keith's expected classical interpretations. This time it's "Malambo" taken from Alberto Ginastera's Estancia Suite. This digipak set comes with a bonus DVD featuring live footage of the band as well as interviews. Highest recommendation.
    $15.00
  • 2LP gatefold sleeve on 180 gram vinyl.  Comes with the album on CD as a bonus.Title says it all. Reworking of classic Genesis tracks this time helped out by a who's who of prog: J. Wetton, B. Bruford, T. Levin, C. Thompson, I. McDonald, N. Magnus, and the list goes on and on. If that isn't enough Steve sticks the Royal Philharmonic on here also. The nice folks at Snapper Music say this is digitally remastered, has "informative liner notes", and a full colour booklet. Essential for anyone who drools at the thought of John Wetton singing "Watcher Of The Skies"...
    $17.00
  • Seventh album from one of the leading lights of the modern progressive rock movement.  The album demonstrates the band expanding the scope of their sound a bit as some of the material has a metallic quality.  Overall though the band stays true to their roots - plenty of 'tron, organ and analog keyboard sounds to be heard.  These guys didn't forget where they came from.  They just crossed over to the dark side...a little bit.  Embrace the crunch and enjoy.  Highly recommended.
    $9.00
  • "Dancer and the Moon is Blackmore s Night 8th studio album. Despite Ritchie Blackmore s past as a guitar player in Deep Purple and Rainbow, he is now in another stage of his musical life, concentrating on modern Folk, Renaissance and Progressive Rock music. Besides Ritche s incredible talent as aguitar player, the other selling point for Blackmore s Night is vocalist Candice Night, the beautiful wife of Ritchie Blackmore who could be described as a younger, and folkier, version of Stevie Nicks."Deluxe digipak CD/DVD edition.  The DVD features a documentary as well as acoustic versions of 3 tunes that are on the album and one that is not.
    $19.00
  • "Esoteric Recordings are proud to announce the release of a newly re-mastered and expanded of Galactic Zoo Dossier , the first album by Arthur Brown's Psych / Space Rock outfit Kingdom Come. Issued on Polydor in 1971, the album launched the band, gaining instant notoriety. Touching on the musical territory of fellow travellers Hawkwind, Galactic Zoo Dossier was a masterwork and is now rightly regarded as a classic. This newly remastered edition includes bonus tracks of three alternate versions of Metal Monster , Space Plucks and Sunrise , together with both tracks from a BBC Radio One John Peel session from March 1971 (previously unreleased on CD)."
    $18.00
  • "The Allman Brothers Band's fifth live release in 25 years, cut during 1994 in Raleigh, NC, and at the Garden State Arts Center in New Jersey, is a high-water mark in their Epic Records catalog. If anything, they're even better here than they were on the earlier Evening With the Allman Brothers Band, the old material getting fresh new approaches -- the band was on for both nights, and presented sets, including an acoustic version of "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" and "Jessica" (which won a Grammy Award), that soared and flowed, especially Dickey Betts and Warren Haynes' guitars. What's more, the clarity of the recording and the volume at which it was recorded make this a most rewarding 70 minutes of live music on a purely technical level -- you can practically hear the action on the guitars during the acoustic set. It won't replace Live at Fillmore East or the live portions of Eat a Peach, but it deserves a place on the shelf not very far from them." - Allmusic
    $5.00
  • Believe it or not this is where it all began for me. After coming home from school one day I saw Rick Wakeman on the Mike Douglas show. He was this odd looking guy with long blonde hair and a flowing cape to match. He had an arsenal of keyboards making strange sounds...it was "The Battle". That appearance led me down to Sam Goody's to buy my first prog album - Journey To The Centre Of The Earth. Sure it's pompous, overblown, whatever. I still have fond memories of it and love Wakeman's elaborate keyboard work and the band's integration with the orchestra. A personal classic.
    $5.00